Brentwood Country Mart

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Brentwood Country Mart
LocationBrentwood, Los Angeles, California
Coordinates34°02′51″N 118°29′26″W / 34.0475109°N 118.4904307°W / 34.0475109; -118.4904307Coordinates: 34°02′51″N 118°29′26″W / 34.0475109°N 118.4904307°W / 34.0475109; -118.4904307
Address225 26th Street near San Vicente Boulevard
Opening date1948
OwnerJ.S. Rosenfield & Co
ArchitectRowland Crawford
Total retail floor area30,000 sq ft (2,800 m2)
Websitebrentwoodcountrymart.com

The Brentwood Country Mart is a local shopping village in the Brentwood district of Los Angeles, California, next to the Santa Monica eastern city limit. First opened on November 18, 1948, it has now become a tourist destination as many celebrities are frequently seen at the mart.

General Info[edit]

The Brentwood Country Mart is a 30,000 sq ft (2,800 m2) shopping center,[1] located at 225 26th street just south of San Vincente Blvd. Architect Rowland Crawford designed the barn-like architecture.[2] The Brentwood Country Mart retains Rowland Crawford's barn inspired design. The Mart has its own free parking lot and offers an outdoor dining area surrounding a large fire pit in the middle. The Mart hosts a variety of boutiques and dining options. Additionally, The Brentwood Country Mart offers a multitude of free events for families.[2] The variety of stores in the Mart allows shoppers to complete the majority of their tasks in one place.

History[edit]

In the 1920s, land was zoned in Brentwood Place; 26th street and San Vicente Boulevard was reserved for commercial construction.[3] The Herbert M. Baruch Corporation, a construction company that existed from the early 1920s until the mid 1950s, originally developed the country mart. Louis M. Sentei and A.L. Levin were the original owners of the mart. Their mission was to create a “one stop shopping” center in the heart of Brentwood.[4] Architect Rowland Crawford, famous for designing the Santa Monica Sears Department Store,[5] and phase two of the Los Angeles Times Building,[6] designed a commercial building with a country feel to it. Sentei and Levin aimed to create a similarity to the Fairfax District Farmers' Market, a place containing a grouping of fresh food eateries. His design embodied the rural atmosphere of Brentwood at the time. People came visit the country mart on horseback even as late as 1948. The Country Mart included a post office, shoe repair, and barbershop, which are still present today.[3]

J.S. Rosenfield and Co.[edit]

In 2003 the Brentwood Country Mart was acquired by James Rosenfield of J.S. Rosenfield and co.[7] He restored the property architecturally, and reinstated many of the Mart's original offerings, such as a post office, barber shop, toy store, and shoe repair shop, as well as a rotating series of pop-up shops such as Kule and Rowing Blazers. J.S. Rosenfield and co. leased the property from John E. Anderson (the namesake of UCLA Anderson school of business).[1] J.S. Rosenfield and co., founded in 1987, prides itself on restoring historic shopping districts and providing communities with unique, wholesome experiences. J.S. Rosenfield and co. is also the owner of the Montecito and Marin Country Marts, the Aero Theatre, and multiple other locations.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Vincent, Roger (January 27, 2003). "Developer Buys Brentwood Country Mart". Los Angeles Times.
  2. ^ a b "Brentwood Country Mart". Brentwood Country Mart. Retrieved March 31, 2012.
  3. ^ a b Loomis, Jan (2008). Brentwood. Charleston, SC: Arcadia Publishing. pp. 94–95.
  4. ^ McKinney, Delores (September 2007). "Looking Back To Preserve The Country Mart Spirit...And Add a New Dose Of Energy". Brentwood News.
  5. ^ Summers, Jodi. "Santa Monica Historic Landmarks". Sotheby's International Realty, Inc. Retrieved April 2, 2012.
  6. ^ Michelson, Alan. "Crawford, Rowland". Washington University. Retrieved April 2, 2012.
  7. ^ Roger Vincent (January 27, 2003), Developer Buys Brentwood Country Mart Los Angeles Times.
  8. ^ "J.S. Rosenfield and co". J.S. Rosenfield. Retrieved April 1, 2012.

External links[edit]