Brian Barnett Duff

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Brian Duff
Senior Judge of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois
In office
October 30, 1996 – February 25, 2016
Judge of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois
In office
October 17, 1985 – October 30, 1996
Appointed by Ronald Reagan
Preceded by New seat
Succeeded by Ronald A. Guzman
Personal details
Born (1930-09-15)September 15, 1930
Dallas, Texas, U.S.
Died February 25, 2016(2016-02-25) (aged 85)
Wilmette, Illinois, U.S.
Resting place All Saints Cemetery
Des Plaines, Illinois, U.S.
Relations Paul (deceased), John, Ellen (deceased), Roderick (deceased), Kevin (deceased), Elizabeth Murphy, Gerald (deceased), Shelia (deceased), Brendan
Parents Dr. Paul Harrington Duff (deceased)
Frances Ellen Duff
Education St. John's Preparatory School
Alma mater University of Notre Dame
DePaul University College of Law
Military service
Allegiance  United States of America
Service/branch  United States Navy
Years of service 1953–1961
Rank US-O3 insignia.svg Lieutenant

Brian Barnett Duff (September 15, 1930 – February 25, 2016) was a United States federal judge of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois.

Duff was born in Dallas, Texas as the third of ten children.[1][2]

He received an A.B. from the University of Notre Dame in 1953 and received a J.D. from DePaul University College of Law in 1962.

Duff was in the United States Navy Lieutenant, JAG Corps from 1953 to 1956 and served in the U.S. Naval Reserve from 1957 to 1961. He was an Assistant to C.E.O., Banker's Life and Casualty from 1962 to 1967. For a year Duff was a Vice president and general counsel, R. H. Gore Co. from 1968 to 1969 and in private practice from 1965 until 1976 in Chicago, Illinois.

Career as a judge[edit]

From 1971 to 1976, Duff was a Member in the Illinois House of Representatives. He served as the minority whip for the Republican Party. He was also judge on the Circuit Court of Cook County, Criminal Division from 1976 to 1979, and then at Circuit Court of Cook County, Law Jury Division from 1979 to 1985.

Duff was a federal judge on the United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois. On August 1, 1985, Duff was nominated by President Ronald Reagan to a new seat created by 98 Stat. 333.[3] He was later confirmed by the United States Senate on October 16, 1985, and received his commission on October 17, 1985. He took senior status due to a certified disability on October 30, 1996.[4]

Personal life[edit]

Brian Duff was married to Florence Buckley in 1953. They had their first child, Ellen, in 1955, and had four sons (Brian, Roderick, Kevin, and Daniel) in the following years. Duff died on February 25, 2016.[5][6]

Judge Duff's grandmother was Julia Harrington Duff, the first Irish Catholic woman elected to the Boston School Committee, in 1901.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Illinois blue book, 1971-1972". idaillinois.org. Retrieved 14 June 2015. 
  2. ^ Griffin, Richard (April 2, 2008). News travels far and reconnects peers Archived November 8, 2012, at the Wayback Machine.. Wicked Local – West Roxbury Transcript.
  3. ^ Davidson, Jean (July 31, 1985). "Reagan taps Judge Duff for federal bench." Chicago Tribune.
  4. ^ Possley, Maurice; O Connor, Matt (October 11, 1996). "Judge steps down after decade of controversy." Chicago Tribune.
  5. ^ "Honorable Brian Barnett Duff Obituary". Legacy.com. February 25, 2016. Retrieved April 2, 2016. 
  6. ^ Brian Duff Obituary on Tributes.com
  7. ^ Polly Welts Kaufman, "Julia Harrington Duff and the Political Awakening of Irish-American Women in Boston, 1888-1905" in Susan Lynne Porter, Women of the Commonwealth: Work, Family, and Social Change in Nineteenth-Century Massachusetts (University of Massachusetts Press 1996). ISBN 9781558490055

External links[edit]

Legal offices
Preceded by
new seat
Judge of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois
1985–1996
Succeeded by
Ronald A. Guzman