Brian Froud

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Brian Froud
10.14.12BrianFroudByLuigiNovi.jpg
Froud at the 2012 New York Comic Con.
Born1947 (age 72–73)
Winchester, England
EducationMaidstone College of Art
Known forIllustration, painting, and conceptual design.
Spouse(s)
Wendy Froud (m. 1980)
Awards

Brian Froud (born 1947) is an English fantasy illustrator. He is most widely known for his 1978 book Faeries with Alan Lee, and as the conceptual designer of the films The Dark Crystal and Labyrinth.[4][5] According to Wired, Froud is "one of the most pre-emiminent visualizers of the world of faerie and folktale".[6]

Froud lives and works in Devon with his wife, Wendy Froud, who is also a fantasy artist. The landscapes in his paintings are frequently inspired by Dartmoor. Froud’s most recent work has been developing the 2019 web television series The Dark Crystal: Age of Resistance.

Early life[edit]

Froud was born in Winchester, England in 1947, and grew up in Kent. He enrolled as a painter at Maidstone College of Art in 1967, where he graduated with a first class honors diploma in Graphic Design in 1971.[7]

Career[edit]

Froud was the conceptual designer for the Jim Henson films The Dark Crystal and Labyrinth.[7] He collaborated with Terry Jones, who was a screenwriter on Labyrinth, on The Goblins of the Labyrinth (1986, re-issued in abridged form as The Goblin Companion: A Field Guide to Goblins in 1996), and subsequently on a number of non-Labyrinth-related books about fairies and goblins, namely of the "Lady Cottington" series, such as Lady Cottington's Pressed Fairy Book. He has also worked with American writer Ari Berk on more recent books, including Goblins! and The Runes of Elfland, and produced art books such as Good Faeries/Bad Faeries. One of his most famous art books, Faeries, produced in collaboration with Alan Lee, was the basis of a 1981 animated feature of the same name.[8][9][10]

Personal life[edit]

Froud is married to Wendy Froud, a puppet-maker and sculptor whom he met at the Jim Henson Studios in 1978 while working on The Dark Crystal.[7] The couple married on 31 May 1980, in Chagford.[11][12] They have a son, Toby, who portrayed the infant of the same name in Labyrinth; he is now an accomplished puppeteer and creature fabricator.[13]

Works[edit]

Illustration works[edit]

  • Ultra-violet catastrophe!, or The unexpected walk with Great-Uncle Magnus Pringle (1975)
  • Are All the Giants Dead? (1975)
  • The Wind Between the Stars (1976)
  • The Land of Froud (1977)
  • Master Snickup's Cloak (1978)
  • Faeries (1978) — With Alan Lee
  • The World of the Dark Crystal (1982)
  • Goblins: Pop-up Book (1983)
  • Goblins of the Labyrinth (1986)
  • The Goblin Companion: A Field Guide to Goblins (1986)
  • The Dreaming Place (1990)
  • Lady Cottington's Pressed Fairy Book (1994)
  • Quentin Cottington's Journal of Faery Research: Strange Stains and Mysterious Smells (1996)
  • Good Faeries/Bad Faeries (1998)
  • The Faeries' Oracle (2000)
  • The Runes of Elfland (2003)
  • Goblins! (2004)
  • The Secret Sketchbooks of Brian Froud (2005)
  • Chelsea Morning (2005)
  • Brian Froud's World of Faerie (2007)
  • Heart of Faerie Oracle (2010)
  • How to See Faeries (2011) — With John Matthews
  • Trolls (2012) - With Wendy Froud
  • Faeries' Tales (2014)

Brian Froud's Faerielands series[edit]

Conceptual works[edit]

Awards and nominations[edit]

Illustration[edit]

In 1979, Froud was nominated for the British Fantasy Award for Best Artwork for Plate 12 of his 1977 book, The Land of Froud.[14] For his 1978 book with Alan Lee, Faeries, Froud won second place in the 1979 Locus Award for Best Art Book[15] (Froud has been a runner up four times through to 2015).[16] Fairies was also nominated for the 1979 Balrog Award for Best Professional Publication.[17] The same year, Froud was also runner up for the Locus Award for Best Artist (he has been a runner up four times through to 1999).[16]

Four years later, Froud was a nominee at the 1983 Hugo Awards in the category of Best Non-Fiction Book for The World of the Dark Crystal, for which Froud was the illustrator in a partnership with writer J. J. Llewellyn.[18] The World of the Dark Crystal won fifth place in the 1983 Locus Award for Best Nonfiction/Reference Book.[19] The same year, Froud was also nominated for the Balrog Award for Best Artist.[20]

In 1991, Froud was honoured by the World Fantasy Convention with a nomination for the World Fantasy Award for Best Artist (he was nominated for this award again four years later).[21]

In 1995, Froud won the Hugo Award for Best Original Artwork for his illustrations in Lady Cottington's Pressed Fairy Book, a collaboration with writer Terry Jones.[1] The book also won the Chesley Award for Best Interior Illustration, and Froud was also nominated that year for the Chesley Award for Artistic Achievement.[2] For The Wise Woman, Froud won a certificate in the 1995 Spectrum Award for Best Book.[22]

For his illustrations in Terry Windling's novel, The Wood Wife, Froud was nominated for the BSFA Award for Best Artwork in 1998.[23] The following year, for his artwork in Good Faeries/Bad Faeries, another collaboration with Windling, Froud won his second Chesley Award for Best Interior Illustration[3] (he has been a finalist six times through to 2008).[16]

Film[edit]

Year Award Category Work Result
1987 BAFTA Film Award Best Special Visual Effects Labyrinth – with Roy Field, George Gibbs and Tony Dunsterville Nominated[24]
1987 Saturn Award Best Costume Design Labyrinth – with Ellis Flyte Nominated[25]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "1995 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 7 May 2011. Retrieved 19 April 2010.
  2. ^ a b "1995 Chesley Awards". Locus Magazine. Archived from the original on 6 April 2014. Retrieved 24 December 2019.
  3. ^ a b "1999 Chesley Awards". Locus Magazine. Archived from the original on 6 April 2014. Retrieved 14 March 2014.
  4. ^ Heffley, Lynne (22 October 1998). "A Very Full 'Hollow'". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on 13 March 2020. Retrieved 13 March 2020.
  5. ^ "Brian & Wendy Froud". Wall Street International. 29 September 2014. Archived from the original on 13 March 2020. Retrieved 13 March 2020.
  6. ^ Gilsdorf, Ethan (12 October 2012). "Fantasy Legends Brian and Wendy Froud at New York Comic Con This Weekend: The Q&A". Wired. Retrieved 13 March 2020.
  7. ^ a b c "Brian Froud". DarkCrystal.com. The Jim Henson Company. Archived from the original on 26 August 2019. Retrieved 9 September 2019.
  8. ^ "The World of Brian Froud". Archived from the original on 21 February 2011.
  9. ^ "Faeries". Internet Movie Database.
  10. ^ Brian Froud; Alan Lee (1979). David Larkin (ed.). Faeries. Bantam Doubleday Dell Publishing Group.
  11. ^ Henson, Jim (31 May 1980). "5/31/1980 – 'Wendy marries Brian Froud in Chagford.'". Jim Henson's Red Book. Archived from the original on 22 April 2016. Retrieved 27 December 2019.
  12. ^ "The Dark Crystal - The Making Of..." DarkCrystal.com. The Jim Henson Company.
  13. ^ "Toby Froud". Internet Movie Database.
  14. ^ "British Fantasy Awards 1979". Science Fiction Awards Database. Locus Science Fiction Foundation. Archived from the original on 27 October 2019. Retrieved 24 December 2019.
  15. ^ "Locus Awards 1979". Science Fiction Awards Database. Locus Science Fiction Foundation. Archived from the original on 20 August 2019. Retrieved 10 March 2020.
  16. ^ a b c "Brian Froud". Science Fiction Awards Database. Locus Science Fiction Foundation. Archived from the original on 3 August 2019. Retrieved 10 March 2020.
  17. ^ "Balrog Awards 1979". Science Fiction Awards Database. Locus Science Fiction Foundation. Archived from the original on 4 August 2019. Retrieved 12 March 2020.
  18. ^ "1983 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Retrieved 6 December 2019.
  19. ^ "Locus Awards 1983". Science Fiction Awards Database. Locus Science Fiction Foundation. Archived from the original on 20 August 2019. Retrieved 12 March 2020.
  20. ^ "Balrog Awards 1983". Science Fiction Awards Database. Locus Science Fiction Foundation. Archived from the original on 4 August 2019. Retrieved 12 March 2020.
  21. ^ "Nominees". worldfantasy.org. World Fantasy Convention. Archived from the original on 8 December 2019. Retrieved 24 December 2019.
  22. ^ "Spectrum Awards 1995". Science Fiction Awards Database. Locus Science Fiction Foundation. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 25 December 2019.
  23. ^ "British SF Association Awards 1998". Science Fiction Awards Database. Locus Science Fiction Foundation. Archived from the original on 28 April 2019. Retrieved 24 December 2019.
  24. ^ "Film in 1987". British Academy of Film and Television Arts. Retrieved 3 December 2019.
  25. ^ "1987 Saturn Awards". Internet Movie Database. Retrieved 24 December 2019.

External links[edit]