Brian Harvey (lecturer)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Brian K. Harvey
Brian Harvey (lecturer).jpg
Born1949 (age 69–70)
ResidenceUnited States
Alma mater
Known for
Awards
  • Berkeley Distinguished Teaching Award [1995]
  • Diane S. McEntyre Award for Excellence in Teaching Computer Science [1997]
  • Jim and Donna Gray Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching of Computer Science [1999]
Scientific career
Fields
InstitutionsUniversity of California, Berkeley
ThesisThe high school computer center: educational goals in theory and practice (philosophy, programming, moral) (1985; 34 years ago (1985))
Influences
Websitepeople.eecs.berkeley.edu/~bh

Brian Keith Harvey (born 1949) is a former Lecturer SOE of computer science at University of California, Berkeley. He and his students developed an educational programming language named UCBLogo which is free and open-source software, a dialect of the language Logo, as an interpreter, for learners.

He received his B.S. in mathematics at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), 1969, a M.S. in computer science, Stanford University, 1975, and a Ph.D. in science and mathematics education, University of California, Berkeley, 1985. He also received a M.A. in clinical psychology, New College of California, 1990.

Work[edit]

Until retiring in July 2013, Harvey taught introductory (lower-division) computer science courses at Berkeley, and CS 195, Social Implications of Computing.[1] He was also involved in the development of the language Logo for the use in K-12 education.

Together with the German programmer Jens Mönig, Harvey designed the programming language Build Your Own Blocks (BYOB), and its successor Snap!, an extended version of the language Scratch, which added higher-order functions and true object-oriented inheritance for first-class sprites. With CS10, The Beauty and Joy of Computing at Berkeley he co-established the first course to use BYOB and spread it to other colleges and high schools.

Awards[edit]

  • 1995, University of California, Berkeley, Distinguished Teaching Award[2]
  • 1997, University of California, Berkeley, Diane S. McEntyre Award for Excellence in Teaching Computer Science[3]
  • 1999, University of California, Berkeley, Jim and Donna Gray Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching of Computer Science[3]

Selected publications[edit]

  • Harvey, Brian K. (2011). "Why Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs matters". Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences. University of California, Berkeley. Retrieved 2019-05-11.
  • Harvey, Brian K. (2001). "Harmful to Children? The Alliance for Childhood Report". Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences. University of California, Berkeley. Retrieved 2019-05-11.
  • Harvey, Brian K.; Wright, Matthew (December 1993). Simply Scheme: Introducing Computer Science. Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press. ISBN 9780262082266. Retrieved 2019-05-11.
  • Harvey, Brian K. (March 1997). Volume 1: Symbolic Computing. Computer Science Logo Style. 1. Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press. ISBN 0-262-58148-5. Retrieved 2019-05-11.
  • Harvey, Brian K. (March 1997). Volume 2: Advanced Techniques. University of California, Berkeley, Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences. Computer Science Logo Style. 2. Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press. ISBN 0-262-58149-3. Retrieved 2019-05-11.
  • Harvey, Brian K. (March 1997). Volume 3: Beyond Programming. Computer Science Logo Style. 3. Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press. ISBN 0-262-58150-7. Retrieved 2019-05-11.
  • 1997 Reasoning with Computers
  • 1994 Is Programming Obsolete?
  • 1992 Avoiding Recursion
  • 1992 Beyond Programming
  • 1991 Symbolic Programming vs. the AP Curriculum
  • 1985 Computer Hacking and Ethics
  • 1980 Using Computers for Educational Freedom

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hafner, Kate (2003-05-22). "Computing's Lost Allure". New York Times. Retrieved 2012-10-17.
  2. ^ "Past DTA Recipients". Center for Teaching & Learning. University of California, Berkeley. 2019. Retrieved 2019-05-09.
  3. ^ a b "UC Berkeley Awards". Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences. University of California, Berkeley. 2019. Retrieved 2019-05-09.

External links[edit]