Brian J. Boyle

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Brian J. Boyle is a Scottish astrophysicist based in Australia since 1996. His primary research interests are in the fields of quasars, active galaxies and cosmology.

He has been involved in science-direction setting in Australia for over 15 years, contributing the mid-term review in 2000,[1] leading the development of the Australian Astronomy Decadal Plan 2006-15[2] and facilitating the development of the Optical and Radio Astronomy Investment Plan for the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy[3] in 2007.[4]

He was awarded the Centenary Medal for services to Australian Astronomy in 2003 and elected as a fellow of the Australian Academy of Science in 2006.[5][6]

Boyle is currently CSIRO SKA Director as well as the Project Director for the Australia–New Zealand SKA bid.[7] In these roles he plays a major part both nationally and internationally in the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) program; a project to build the world’s largest cm-wavelength radio telescope.

Education[edit]

Boyle attended school at Stewart's Melville College in Edinburgh, Scotland. He obtained a BSc in Astrophysics from Edinburgh University in 1982 and a PhD from the University of Durham in 1986. His thesis title was "The Evolution and Clustering of Optically Selected Quasi-stellar Objects."[8]

Career[edit]

Boyle has held positions at the University of Edinburgh, as Director of the Australian Astronomical Observatory (1996 to 2003)[9] and Director of CSIRO Australia Telescope National Facility (2003 to 2009) before his appointment to CSIRO SKA Director in February 2009.

Research[edit]

Boyle has published more than 300 papers in astronomy,[citation needed] and has undertaken research programs on the:

In 2007, Boyle was a member of one of the two teams of scientists who shared the 2007 Gruber Cosmology Prize. The team was awarded the prize for their discovery that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating, leading to the idea of an expansion force, dubbed dark energy.[10]

Awards (Since 2000)[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Beyond 2000: The Way Ahead", ARC, retrieved 27 April 2011 from "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-04-22. Retrieved 2011-04-27. 
  2. ^ National Committee for Astronomy of the Australian Academy of Science (November 2005). "New Horizons: A Decadal Plan for Australian Astronomy 2006 – 2015" (PDF). Editorial Note: Commonwealth of Australia. p. 2. ISBN 0 85847 226 0. Retrieved 28 January 2015. The Decadal Plan was edited for the National Committee of Astronomy by an Editorial Board comprising Brian Boyle (chair)... 
  3. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-04-22. Retrieved 2011-04-27. 
  4. ^ "Funding Agreement for the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy", Astronomy Australia, retrieved 27 April 2011 from "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-02-17. Retrieved 2011-04-27. 
  5. ^ "18 new Fellows elected". Australian Academy of Science. Retrieved 28 January 2015. 
  6. ^ "Dr Brian Boyle: CSIRO SKA Director". CSIRO Australia Telescope National Facility. 
  7. ^ "Australian and New Zealand SKA Coordination Committee (ANZSCC)". Commonwealth of Australia. Archived from the original on 28 January 2015. Retrieved 28 January 2015. 
  8. ^ Boyle, B. J. (1 January 1986). "Clustering and evolution of optically selected quasi-stellar objects.". Ph.D. Thesis – via NASA ADS. 
  9. ^ "About Us". The Anglo-Australian Telescope. Retrieved 11 January 2015. 
  10. ^ "'Accidental revolutionaries' net US$500,000 cosmology prize", CSIRO, retrieved 15 April 2011 from "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2010-04-30. Retrieved 2011-04-27. 
  11. ^ "Extract for BOYLE, Brian John Award:Centenary Medal". It's an Honour: Australia Celebrating Australians. Government of the Commonwealth of Australia. 
  12. ^ "Extract for BOYLE, Brian John Award:Public Service Medal". It's an Honour: Australia Celebrating Australians. Government of the Commonwealth of Australia. 

External links[edit]