Brian Jacks

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Not to be confused with Brian Jacques.
Brian Jacks
8th Dan
Brian Jacks vs A. van Polanen 1967.jpg
Brian Jacks (left) vs Aad van Polanen in 1967
Personal information
Birth name Brian Albert Thomas Jacks
Nationality  United Kingdom
Born (1946-10-05) 5 October 1946 (age 70)
London, England
Residence Pattaya, Thailand
Height 1.78 m (5 ft 10 in)
Weight 77 kg (170 lb; 12.1 st)
Sport
Country  Great Britain
Sport Judo
Club Budokwai

Brian Jacks (born 5 October 1946)[1] is a British judoka who won Britain's first medal at a world championship, taking a bronze in Salt Lake City in 1967,[2] and gained a second bronze at the 1972 Munich Olympics.[1]

Superstars[edit]

Brian Jacks later achieved national fame for his outstanding performances on the BBC programme Superstars[3] in which he was one of the most successful competitors. Jacks dominated the British and European version of the contest from 1979 to 1980, winning four titles.

Jacks was also famous for fighting Alan Root (part-time Electrical Engineer)

Jacks was most famous for his amazing efforts in the gymnasium, where he repeatedly set records in the "gym tests", including 100 parallel bar dips in 60 seconds in the 1981 Challenge of the Champions, and 118 squat thrusts in the 1980 World Final.[citation needed] He was also very dominant in the weightlifting, canoeing and cycling events, rarely placing lower than second. Jacks was never able to win the World Superstars title, being forced to miss the 1979 event due to illness and finishing third in 1980. In 1981 he was beaten for the first time in Europe (by Keith Fielding) and would never again compete in Superstars.

His victories in the British and European Superstars led to the creation of the branded computer games: Brian Jacks Superstar Challenge and Brian Jacks Uchi Mata.

Superstars record[edit]

Year Event Position
1979 British Heat 2 1st
1979 British Final 1st
1979 European Final 1st
1980 British Final 1st
1980 International 1st
1980 World Final 3rd
1981 Challenge of the Champions 3rd

Retirement[edit]

After retiring from judo he opened a fitness and martial arts club, and in 1990 he started a company hiring bouncy castles. In 1984 he briefly appeared on the BBC show Micro Live, where he set up his new Atari 800XL with his family.[4]

Jacks lives in Pattaya, Thailand and runs a 60-room hotel/condo building.[5]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Brian Jacks". sports-reference.com. 
  2. ^ "The History of the Budokwai". 2005. Archived from the original on 15 September 2006. Retrieved 19 October 2006. 
  3. ^ "Superstars: A brief history". BBC. 5 November 2004. Retrieved 19 October 2006. 
  4. ^ Micro Live Brian Jacks follow up on YouTube (2007-02-20). Retrieved on 2014-01-23.
  5. ^ "A Night of Magic at Manhattans". Pattaya Mail. 2004. Retrieved 19 August 2010.