Brian McCutcheon (ice hockey)

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Brian McCutheon
Born (1949-08-03) August 3, 1949 (age 67)
Toronto, ONT, CAN
Height 5 ft 10 in (178 cm)
Weight 180 lb (82 kg; 12 st 12 lb)
Position Left Wing
Shot Left
Played for Fort Worth Wings
Tidewater Red Wings
Port Huron Wings
Virginia Wings
London Lions
Detroit Red Wings
New Haven Nighthawks
Kansas City Blues
Kansas City Red Wings
EC Graz
NHL Draft Undrafted
Playing career 1968–1980
Brian McCutcheon
Sport(s) Ice hockey
Biographical details
Alma mater Cornell
Playing career
1968–1971 Cornell
Position(s) Forward
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1981–1987 Elmira
1987–1995 Cornell
1995–1996 Los Angeles Ice Dogs (Assistant)
1996–1997 Columbus Chill
1997–2000 Rochester Americans
2000–2006 Buffalo Sabres (Assistant)
2006–2011 Buffalo Sabres (Associate)
2011–2012 HC Bolzano (Assistant)
2012–2013 HC Bolzano
2014–2015 Kölner Haie (Assistant)
2015–2016 Füchse Duisburg
Head coaching record
Overall 209-167-22 (.553) (College)
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
2011–12 Italy Champion
Awards
1997 John Brophy Award

Brian Kenneth 'Boom Boom' McCutcheon (born August 3, 1949) is a Canadian former professional ice hockey player who played 37 games in the National Hockey League with the Detroit Red Wings. Since 1981 he has served in a variety of coaching positions spread across many leagues, most recently as head coach for Füchse Duisburg in 2015-16.[1]

Playing career[edit]

McCutcheon was recruited to play at Cornell under Ned Harkness. In his junior season McCutcheon led his team in goals[2] while the Big Red compiled the first (and thus far only) undefeated national championship in NCAA history. After graduating in 1971 McCutcheon embarked on a professional career. Despite going undrafted, McCutcheon was signed by the Detroit Red Wings.[3] After scoring only 7 points in 45 games across three leagues in 1971-72 McCutcheon settled down with the Virginia Wings in the mid-1970s, eventually receiving a call-up to the parent club. While McCutcheon was a capable minor league player he couldn't adjust to the NHL level, recording only 4 points in 37 games over three seasons with the Wings. He spent the entire 1977-78 season in the CHL before heading overseas to finish his playing career with EC Graz.

Coaching career[edit]

College[edit]

A year after hanging up his skates McCutcheon reappeared behind the bench at Elmira, a Division III program. Over six seasons with the Soaring Eagles McCutcheon saw a good amount of success, posting 5 winning records, and an appearance in the 1986 tournament.[4] In 1987 he returned to his alma mater taking over as head coach from Lou Reycroft, becoming the second player from the 1970 team to coach the Big Red (Dick Bertrand being the first).[5]

McCutcheon was tasked with rebuilding Cornell to its former glory after having declined over the previous ten years. The initial years were good, seeing the big Red post five consecutive winning seasons and making the tournament in 1991 but from 1992–93 on the team struggled and finished with three straight losing campaigns.[6] Compounding matters, McCutcheon had become infamous for his antics and he was fired in 1995.[7]

Professional[edit]

Despite the ending in Ithaca McCutcheon didn't stay idle for long, accepting a position as an assistant with the Los Angeles Ice Dogs for the 1995–96 season. The following year he became the head coach for the Columbus Chill of the ECHL, leading the team to its first division title and receiving the John Brophy Award for his efforts. As further recognition he was promoted to the AHL and coached the Rochester Americans to consecutive Calder Cup finals. McCutcheon eventually made his way back to the NHL, becoming an assistant with the Buffalo Sabres under Lindy Ruff. McCutcheon was named as an associate in 2006 but left the team five years later when his contract was not renewed.[8] Since leaving the NHL McCutcheon has coached several teams in Europe in varying capacities.

Career Statistics[edit]

    Regular season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1968–69 Cornell ECAC 29 17 22 39 28
1969–70 Cornell ECAC 29 25 21 46 44
1970–71 Cornell ECAC 27 17 24 41 48
1971-72 Fort Worth Wings CHL 13 0 1 1 9
1971-72 Tidewater Red Wings AHL 18 1 1 2 2
1971-72 Port Huron Wings IHL 14 2 2 4 0
1972-73 Virginia Wings AHL 68 23 19 42 64 13 3 1 4 7
1973-74 London Lions Ind. 71 47 28 75 75
1974-75 Virginia Wings AHL 30 12 9 21 24
1974–75 Detroit Red Wings NHL 17 3 1 4 2
1975-76 New Haven Nighthawks AHL 58 27 19 46 22
1975–76 Detroit Red Wings NHL 8 0 0 0 5
1976-77 Kansas City Blues CHL 27 11 8 19 12
1976–77 Detroit Red Wings NHL 12 0 0 0 0
1977–78 Kansas City Red Wings CHL 60 17 16 33 27
1978–79 EC Graz Austria
1979–80 EC Graz Austria
NHL totals 37 3 1 4 7

College Head Coaching record[9][edit]

Season Team Overall Conference Standing Postseason
Elmira Soaring Eagles (ECAC West) (1981–82–1986–87)
1981–82 Elmira 12-17-0
1982–83 Elmira 14-12-0
1983–84 Elmira 17-8-1
1984–85 Elmira 18-9-0
1985–86 Elmira 25-7-0
1986–87 Elmira 15-9-0
Elmira: 101-62-1
Cornell Big Red (ECAC Hockey) (1987–88–1994–95)
1987–88 Cornell 19-9-0 15-7-0 3rd ECAC Quarterfinals
1988–89 Cornell 16-13-1 13-9-0 t-5th ECAC Third Place Game (Loss)
1989–90 Cornell 16-10-3 12-7-3 11st ECAC Semifinals
1990–91 Cornell 18-11-3 14-5-3 t-2nd NCAA First Round
1991–92 Cornell 14-11-4 10-8-4 t-5th ECAC Runner-Up
1992–93 Cornell 6-19-1 5-16-1 11th
1993–94 Cornell 8-17-5 7-10-5 8th ECAC Quarterfinals
1994–95 Cornell 11-15-4 8-10-4 9th ECAC Quarterfinals
Cornell: 108-105-21 84-72-20
Total: 209-167-22

      National champion         Postseason invitational champion  
      Conference regular season champion         Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion       Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

Awards and honors[edit]

Award Year
All-ECAC Hockey Second Team 1970–71 [10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Brian McCutcheon". Füchse Duisburg. Retrieved 2016-05-29. 
  2. ^ "CORNELL UNIV. 1969-70". Eliteprospects. Retrieved 2016-05-29. 
  3. ^ "Brian Kenneth McCutcheon". Hockey Hall of Fame. Retrieved 2016-05-29. 
  4. ^ "Elmira Men's Hockey Team History". USCHO.com. Retrieved 2016-05-29. 
  5. ^ "Cornell Men's Hockey Team History". USCHO.com. Retrieved 2016-05-29. 
  6. ^ "Brian McCutcheon Year-by-Year Coaching Record". USCHO.com. Retrieved 2016-05-29. 
  7. ^ "Morris, Clarkson Move On". USCHO.com. 2003-08-06. Retrieved 2016-05-29. 
  8. ^ "Sabrea to not Renew Contract of Associate Coach Brian McCutcheon". Buffalo Sabres. 2011-06-02. Retrieved 2016-05-29. 
  9. ^ "2006-07 Cornell Men's Ice Hockey Media Guide" (PDF). Cornell Big Red. Retrieved 2016-05-29. 
  10. ^ "All-ECAC Hockey Teams". College Hockey Historical Archive. Retrieved 2016-05-29. 

External links[edit]