Brian O'Connor (actor)

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Brian O'Connor
Born
Brian Edward O'Connor

(1953-02-14) February 14, 1953 (age 65)
Other namesBrian Brucker O'Connor
OccupationActor
Years active1986–present
Spouse(s)Jane Brucker (1986–1993); 1 child

Brian Edward O'Connor (born February 14, 1953), known professionally as Brian Brucker O'Connor or Brian O'Connor, is an American film, stage and television actor, comedian and guidance counselor. His best known roles include Biddle in Beverly Hills Cop II (1987) and Schemer on Shining Time Station (1989–1993).

Career[edit]

O'Connor graduated from the University of Massachusetts in 1975 to pursue a career in acting. Arriving in Boston, he co-founded the comedy troupe Slap Happy, along with fellow UMass alum Allan Jacobs.[1] Joined by Jeff Ernstoff and Jan Kirschner, the group toured the nation and reached over 200 universities,[2] receiving critical praise for performances in Boston, Cambridge and New York City.[3][4] During the Slap Happy tour, O'Connor participated in a Ford's Theatre production of the Andrew Lloyd Webber musical Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat.[5][6]

O'Connor made his onscreen debut with the recorded-live sketch comedy special National Lampoon's Class of '86 (1986). He followed this with a guest appearance on Miami Vice and his feature film debut in Beverly Hills Cop II (1987) as Biddle. He returned to New York in 1988 to perform a one-man show ("One Hour Out of Your Life") at the Judith Anderson Theatre, earning praise from The New York Times' Stephen Holden.[7]

In 1989, O'Connor was cast as Horace Schemer on Shining Time Station (1989–1993); the character, known commonly as "Schemer", proved to be his signature role. The roguish and clumsy, but still caring, character quickly grew in popularity with audiences. Since the show's cancellation, O'Connor has made numerous public appearances as Schemer.[8][9][10]

Following his appearance in the indie comedy film Terrorists (2004), Mr. O'Connor performed in the 2005 Geva Theatre Center production of the solo play The Race of the Ark Tattoo.[11][12][13][14] Shortly thereafter, he went back to school to become certified as a children's guidance counselor.[15]

In 2016, O'Connor became the vocalist and co-guitarist for independent band The 6660s.[16]

Personal life[edit]

O'Connor was born into a Roman Catholic family of Irish descent, the third of five children. He was married for seven years to actress Jane Brucker, best known for portraying Lisa Houseman in Dirty Dancing (1987); they have a daughter, Sally (born 1989).[9] O'Connor and Brucker appeared in the same 1986 episode of Miami Vice ("Baby Blues"), although their characters did not share scenes.[17]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Quad City Herald". stparchive.com. October 29, 1998. Retrieved October 30, 2016.
  2. ^ Desk, BWW News. "La Mirada Theatre to Present THE GIZMO GUYS, 12/8". broadwayworld.com. Retrieved October 30, 2016.
  3. ^ 1983 Tanglewood, oclc.org; accessed February 25, 2018.
  4. ^ "REVUE: 'SLAP HAPPY'". The New York Times. January 26, 1983. Retrieved October 30, 2016.
  5. ^ "Brian O'Connor Theatre Credits and Profile". abouttheartists.com. Retrieved October 30, 2016.
  6. ^ "1978 - 1987 - Ford's Theatre". fords.org. Retrieved October 30, 2016.
  7. ^ Review/Comedy; A Whimsical Grab Bag, nytimes.com, March 22, 1988.
  8. ^ "Shining Time Station Character Guide". sodor-island.net. Retrieved October 30, 2016.
  9. ^ a b "Lovable Churl – Vol. 40 No. 11". people.com. September 13, 1993. Retrieved October 30, 2016.
  10. ^ "Gripe TV". Articles.chicagotribune.com. 1995-01-03. Retrieved 2016-10-30.
  11. ^ Simpson, Herbert M. "Expectations overturned in a triumph of the old". rochestercitynewspaper.com. Retrieved October 30, 2016.
  12. ^ Willis, John; Hodges, Ben (February 26, 2007). "Theatre World". Hal Leonard Corporation. Retrieved October 30, 2016 – via Google Books.
  13. ^ Improv, Geva Comedy (March 12, 2005). "GCI: An evening with BRIAN O'CONNOR". gevacomedyimprov.blogspot.com. Retrieved October 30, 2016.
  14. ^ WBER. "The Only Station That Matters". monroe.edu. Retrieved 30 October 2016.
  15. ^ "Rick Sigglekow". sodor-island.net. Retrieved October 30, 2016.
  16. ^ "The 6660s". The6660s.com. Retrieved 30 April 2018.
  17. ^ "Baby Blues". nbc.com. November 21, 1986. Retrieved October 30, 2016.

External links[edit]

Brian O'Connor on IMDb