Brian Stauffer

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Brian Stauffer
Born (1966-05-20) May 20, 1966 (age 56)
Education
Known forillustration

Brian Stauffer (born May 20, 1966 in Prescott, Arizona) is an American artist, and illustrator.[1] Stauffer begins works with hand drawn sketches, then incorporates painted elements and scanned found objects. The final works are digital, but often the hand drawn elements remain as part of the finished works.[2]

Early life and education[edit]

Stauffer was born in Prescott, Arizona,[2] and attended Prescott High School.[3][4] Both of his parents were fine artists.[5]

Stauffer attended Yavapai College as a music major. During his second year, Stauffer began working in graphic arts, working with Yavapai instructor and color theorist Glen Peterson.[3] Stauffer later attended The University of Arizona, where he received a BFA in 1989.[2]

Before taking on illustration as a full-time career, Stauffer worked as an art director at New Times in Phoenix, The Miami New Times,[4] and for Starmedia. While working at The Miami New Times, Stauffer sent a few of his illustration samples to Fred Woodward at Rolling Stone magazine who, with Gail Anderson, gave him his first freelance assignment for a movie review.[5]

Influences[edit]

Stauffer cites the works of John Heartfield and Alexander Calder as major influences.[6]

Work[edit]

Stauffer gained recognition early in his illustration career for his November 13, 2000, cover for The Nation, titled Alfred E. Bush, which depicted President George W. Bush as Alfred E. Neuman, the fictitious mascot and cover boy of Mad Magazine. In 2005, the cover was selected by the American Society of Magazine Editors as number 23 of the top 40 magazine covers in the last 40 years.[7]

Stauffer was featured as a cover illustrator for magazines such as The New Yorker,[8] The Nation, and Worth Magazine.[5] In 2010, the Society of Publication Designers recognized the work of design director Dean Sebring and Stauffer for their Worth Magazine covers.[9]

Stauffer was recognized for his contributions to smaller publications, including his work for SF Weekly, and cover illustrations for the Dallas Observer, and Seattle Weekly, among others.[citation needed]

Book illustrations[edit]

Notable poster work[edit]

Awards[edit]

  • Silver Medal (Institutional), 2015, Society of Illustrators, Ambition for the Kroll Foundation, art directed b Kit Hinrichs[15]
  • Silver Medal (Institutional), 2012, Society of Illustrators, Digital Evidence And The Smoking Gun for Emory Law, art directed by Winnie Hume[16]
  • Gold Medal (Editorial), 2010, Society of Illustrators, Infighting Police for Village Voice Media, art directed by Peter Storch[17]
  • Gold Medal for editorial illustration, Society of Illustrators, 2010[6]
  • Gold Print Editorial Award, International Design Awards IDA, Winner with Andrew J. Nilsen, Worlds Apart (2012)[18]
  • Gold Medal (with Dean Sebring, Worth Magazine) Society of Publication Designers (2010)[19]
  • Silver Medals (2) Worth Magazine covers, The Art Directors Club (2012)
  • First place illustration Good Cop Bad Cop for Phoenix New Times, AltWeekly Awards (2010)[20]
  • First place illustration 7-Up vs. Coke, Part 2 for Riverfront Times, AltWeekly Awards (2009)[20]
  • First place illustration The Suitcase Murders for Miami New Times, AltWeekly Awards (2008)[20]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Society of Illustrators Lecture". Retrieved May 31, 2013.
  2. ^ a b c "Arizona Art Museum". Retrieved May 31, 2013.
  3. ^ a b "Stauffer's cover for The Nation voted 23 out of 40 of the best" (PDF). The Rough Writer. Vol. 12, no. 4. Yavapai College. December 2005. p. 1. Archived from the original (PDF) on June 9, 2010.
  4. ^ a b "Yuko Shimizu interview". Archived from the original on May 29, 2013. Retrieved May 31, 2013.
  5. ^ a b c "Alt Pick – Brian Stauffer". January 5, 2004. Archived from the original on May 28, 2013. Retrieved June 1, 2013.
  6. ^ a b "Dallas Observer Interview". June 24, 2011.
  7. ^ "American Society of Magazine Editors Top 40 Covers". Retrieved June 1, 2013.
  8. ^ "Slide Show: Winter Covers". The New Yorker. December 21, 2012. Archived from the original on November 10, 2014. Retrieved September 20, 2021.
  9. ^ "Society of Publication Designers". September 7, 2010. Archived from the original on August 19, 2013. Retrieved June 1, 2013.
  10. ^ Salmansohn, Karen (2003). Art. Illustrated by Brian Stauffer. Berkeley, Calif.: Tricycle Press. ISBN 1-58246-103-1. OCLC 52920510.{{cite book}}: CS1 maint: date and year (link)
  11. ^ Salmansohn, Karen (2005). Fashion. Illustrated by Brian Stauffer. Berkeley, Calif.: Tricycle. ISBN 1-58246-105-8. OCLC 57749623.{{cite book}}: CS1 maint: date and year (link)
  12. ^ "2013 Festival Poster by Brian Stauffer". 2013. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016.
  13. ^ Bloom, Julie; Huang, Jon; Piepenburg/, Erik (March 15, 2012). "New York Times Theater". The New York Times.
  14. ^ "The Vancouver Courier". March 16, 2012.
  15. ^ "Illustrators 57 Award Winners". Retrieved August 25, 2020.
  16. ^ "Illustrators 54 Medal Winners". Retrieved August 25, 2020.
  17. ^ "Illustrators 52 Medal Winners". Retrieved August 25, 2020.
  18. ^ "ZOOM". May 18, 2013. Archived from the original on May 18, 2013.
  19. ^ "Society of Publication Designers 2010 Awards". May 7, 2010. Archived from the original on May 22, 2013. Retrieved June 1, 2013.
  20. ^ a b c "AltWeekly Awards". Retrieved June 1, 2013.

External links[edit]