Bridges' degu

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Bridges' degu
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Rodentia
Family: Octodontidae
Genus: Octodon
Species: O. bridgesi
Binomial name
Octodon bridgesi
Waterhouse, 1845

Bridges' degu (Octodon bridgesi) is a species of rodent in the family Octodontidae. It is found in Argentina and Chile, most typically in southern Chile.[2] The species was named after Thomas Bridges, a Victorian botanist who sent specimens to the British Museum for identification.[3]

Biology and physiology[edit]

Unlike its close relative the common degu, Bridges' degu is nocturnal (active at night).[4]

Bridges' degu has deep molar indentaions and has a deep fold on the inside of the last molar.[5]

Habitat[edit]

The species is less widely distributed in Chile than the common degu and inhabits rocky, forested areas[5] and some open farmland,[2] although it is far less well adapted for digging[4] but does have some climbing ability.[6] Deforestation may be contributing to the decline of this species.[4]

In Argentina it also inhabits southern beeches forests.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lessa, E., Ojeda, R. & Bidau, C. (2008). Octodon bridgesi. In: IUCN 2008. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Retrieved 5 January 2009.
  2. ^ a b Saavedra, B.; Simonetti, J. (2003), "Holocene distribution of Octodontid rodents in central Chile", Revista Chilena de Historia Natural, 76: 383–389., doi:10.4067/s0716-078x2003000300004 
  3. ^ Palma, R.E. (2007), "Estado actual de la mastozoologia en Chile", Mastozoologia Neotropical, 14: 5–9. 
  4. ^ a b c Ocampo-Garcés, A.; Mena, W.; Hernández, F.; Cortés, N.; Palacios, A.G. (2006), "Circadian chronotypes among wild-captured west Andean octodontids", Biol Res., 39: 209–220., doi:10.4067/s0716-97602006000200003 
  5. ^ a b Woods, C.; Boraker, D. (1975), "Octodon degus", Mammalian Species, 67, doi:10.2307/3503820 
  6. ^ Gallardo-Santis, A.; Simonetti, J.A.; Vásquez, R.A. (2005), "Influences of tree diameter on climbing ability of small mammals", Journal of Mammalogy: 969–973, doi:10.1644/1545-1542(2005)86[969:iotdoc]2.0.co;2 
  7. ^ Verzi, D.H.; A. Alcover (1990). "Octodon bridgesi Waterhouse, 1844 (Rodentia : Octodontidae) in the Argentinian living mammalian fauna". Mammalia. 54: 61–67. doi:10.1515/mamm.1990.54.1.61.