Bridgeton, New Jersey

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Bridgeton, New Jersey
City of Bridgeton
Downtown Bridgeton, March 2010
Downtown Bridgeton, March 2010
Map of Bridgeton highlighted within Cumberland County. Right: Location of Cumberland County in New Jersey.
Map of Bridgeton highlighted within Cumberland County. Right: Location of Cumberland County in New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Bridgeton, New Jersey Interactive map of Bridgeton, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Bridgeton, New Jersey
Interactive map of Bridgeton, New Jersey
Bridgeton is located in Cumberland County, New Jersey
Bridgeton
Bridgeton
Location in Cumberland County
Bridgeton is located in New Jersey
Bridgeton
Bridgeton
Location in New Jersey
Bridgeton is located in the United States
Bridgeton
Bridgeton
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 39°25′39″N 75°13′41″W / 39.427518°N 75.227954°W / 39.427518; -75.227954Coordinates: 39°25′39″N 75°13′41″W / 39.427518°N 75.227954°W / 39.427518; -75.227954[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
CountyCumberland
IncorporatedMarch 1, 1865
Named forBridge on Cohansey River
Government
 • TypeFaulkner Act (mayor–council)
 • BodyCity Council
 • MayorAlbert B. Kelly (term ends December 31, 2022)[3][4]
 • AdministratorKevin C. Rabago Sr.[5]
 • Municipal clerkNichole L. Almanza[6]
Area
 • Total6.49 sq mi (16.82 km2)
 • Land6.23 sq mi (16.13 km2)
 • Water0.27 sq mi (0.69 km2)  4.10%
 • Rank249th of 565 in state
13th of 14 in county[1]
Elevation39 ft (12 m)
Population
 • Total27,263
 • Estimate 
(2021)[10][12]
26,610
 • Rank98th of 566 in state
3rd of 14 in county[13]
 • Density4,377.5/sq mi (1,690.2/km2)
  • Rank149th of 566 in state
1st of 14 in county[13]
Time zoneUTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
Area code856[16]
FIPS code3401107600[1][17][18]
GNIS feature ID0885169[1][19]
Websitewww.cityofbridgeton.com

Bridgeton is a city in Cumberland County, in the U.S. state of New Jersey. It is the county seat of Cumberland County[20] and is located on the Cohansey River near Delaware Bay in the South Jersey region of the state.

As of the 2020 United States census, the city's population was 27,263,[10][11] an increase of 1,914 (+7.6%) from the 2010 census count of 25,349,[21][22][23] which in turn reflected an increase of 2,578 (+11.3%) from the 22,771 counted in the 2000 census.[24] Bridgeton and Vineland are the two principal cities of the Vineland-Bridgeton metropolitan statistical area, which encompasses those cities and all of Cumberland County for statistical purposes and which constitutes a part of the Delaware Valley.[25]

As of 2020, Bridgeton had the 13th-highest property tax rate in New Jersey with an equalized rate of 4.598% compared to 3.089% in the county as a whole and a statewide average of 2.279%.[26]

History[edit]

Potter's Tavern

Similar to other areas near rivers and the bay, this area was inhabited for thousands of years by indigenous peoples. At the time of European contact, Lenape Native Americans lived in the area. The tribe followed a seasonal pattern of cultivation and hunting and fishing. The state-recognized Nanticoke Lenni-Lenape Indians of New Jersey maintain a cultural center here, serving a community of 12,000 in Cumberland, Gloucester and Salem counties.[27]

The first recorded European settlement in what is now Bridgeton was made by 1686 when Richard Hancock established a sawmill here.[28] Settlers established a pioneer iron-works in 1814. Bridgeton was incorporated as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 3, 1845,[29] from portions of Deerfield Township. Bridgeton city was incorporated on March 1, 1865, replacing both Bridgeton Township and Cohansey Township.[30] The city was named for its location at a bridge on the Cohansey River[31] and is said to be a corruption of "bridge town".[32]

After the American Civil War, Bridgeton's industrial base and commercial centrality in this area of high agricultural production, along with its high profile as an educational center (it was home to the South Jersey Institute, the West Jersey Academy, and two notable academies for women), made it the most prosperous town in the state. Bridgeton was home to glass factories, sewing factories, metal and machine works and other manufacturers, most notably, the Ferracute Machine Works, which was founded and operated by Oberlin Smith, an inventor and philanthropist credited with inventing the first device for magnetic recording, and now in the New Jersey Inventors Hall of Fame.[33]

Bridgeton Historic District covers a quarter of the city and includes more than 2,000 properties. These range from the early Federal architecture to the 1920s, including many structures eligible for individual listing and some documented by the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS) during the 1930s. The district was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1982 and is the largest such district of any municipality in New Jersey.[34]

Although it is visually dominated by large Victorian homes and a downtown area constructed from the 1880s to the 1920s, the district, besides many neighborhoods of gingerbreaded "doubles" that were essentially working-class housing, includes several notable structures dating from the 18th century and early Federal period. One of these is Potter's Tavern, said to have been built in the 1750s, but restored to its appearance in 1776 when it was home to The Plain Dealer, considered New Jersey's first newspaper.[35]

A second is Brearley (Masonic) Lodge, founded by General James Giles in 1795, and still active. A third is the so-called "Nail House" (c. 1815; second build c. 1855), administrative home of the Cumberland Nail & Iron Works that established Bridgeton's industrial prowess in the early nineteenth century. The first Cumberland National Bank building (1816), which was only the second bank chartered in New Jersey, is now part of the Bridgeton Library.[36] There is also the David Sheppard House (1791), recently restored with assistance from the Garden State Historic Trust and home to the Cousteau Coastal Center of Rutgers University since 2008.[37]

Bridgeton straddles the tidal Cohansey River and is located near the center of the Delaware Bay lowlands. It derives its name from the original movable bridge that offered the option of regular overland travel on the "King's Highway" across the Cohansey watershed region for the first time in 1716. The name is believed to have been changed from Bridge-towne to Bridgeton in 1816–1817 due to a printing error on documents published by the Cumberland Bank.[38]

Bridgeton is home to numerous large municipal parks. The largest of these, consisting of pinelands, wetlands and lakes, as well as the original raceway system that provided waterpower to the mills, was formed out of the property owned and managed by the Cumberland Nail & Iron Works until 1899. Long considered a recreational area for the region even under ownership by the Iron Works, the property was finally purchased in 1902–1903 by the city and preserved in perpetuity as the Bridgeton City Park. It includes three major lakes: Mary Elmer Lake, Sunset Lake, and East Lake.[39] Bridgeton Park encompasses about 1,500 acres (6.1 km2). It now includes the Cohanzick Zoo, New Jersey's oldest zoo, which is free to the public.[40]

The city suffered an economic downturn in the 1980s with the loss of its remaining manufacturing sector jobs in glass and textiles. Agricultural employment, however, has continued to attract immigrant workers largely from Mexico but also Guatemala, creating new challenges and opportunities for revitalization. A significant minority of Bridgeton residents and their children speak Zapoteco, either as their only language or alongside Spanish.[41]

Downtown Bridgeton includes an art gallery, second hand stores, a makerspace, and the headquarters of the Nanticoke Lenni-Lenape Tribal Nation.[42] The makerspace, called STEAMWorks, was opened as a collaborative project between the city and the local Cumberland County College, run by the college the space offers specialized equipment and software to the public at a membership based pricing system, as well as workshops and a limited set of certification courses, no involvement with the college is required.[43]

Bridgeton Main Street declared its downtown a Culinary Arts district and is highlighting downtown activity through the food and cooking-related retail sector. Bridgeton Main Street Association is the oldest Main Street Association in the state, founded in 1990.[44]

In 2008, Rutgers opened the Cousteau Coastal Center of its Institute of Marine & Coastal Sciences in the former David Sheppard House, a base from which it coordinates cutting-edge ecological research and develops modules for environmental learning at all educational levels from elementary school upward.[45]

South Woods State Prison, which opened near Bridgeton in 1997, is the largest state prison in New Jersey and provides a range of employment.[46]

Bridgeton is home to the Rutgers Food Innovation Center, an entry point for startup food manufacturers that allows a new company or entrepreneur to work with a specialized team from Rutgers University to develop, test, brand, and package their product.[47]

Geography[edit]

The Cohansey River in Bridgeton in 2006

Bridgeton is located about one hour away from Philadelphia, and 50 minutes away from Wilmington, Delaware. It is also about one hour away from Atlantic City and Cape May. Bridgeton is divided into three sections, Northside, Southside and Hillside.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the city had a total area of 6.49 square miles (16.82 km2), including 6.23 square miles (16.13 km2) of land and 0.27 square miles (0.69 km2) of water (4.10%).[1][2] Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the city include East Lake.[48]

Bridgeton borders the Cumberland County municipalities of Fairfield Township, Hopewell Township and Upper Deerfield Township.[49][50][51]

Climate[edit]

The climate in this area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Bridgeton has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps.[52]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18706,830
18808,72227.7%
189011,42431.0%
190013,91321.8%
191014,2092.1%
192014,3230.8%
193015,6999.6%
194015,9921.9%
195018,37814.9%
196020,96614.1%
197020,435−2.5%
198018,795−8.0%
199018,9420.8%
200022,77120.2%
201025,34911.3%
202027,2637.6%
2021 (est.)26,610[10][12]−2.4%
Population sources: 1870–2000[53]
1870–1920[54] 1870[55][56] 1880–1890[57]
1890–1910[58] 1870–1930[59]
1930–1990[60] 2000[61][62]
2010[21][22][23] 2020[10][11]

As of 2015, 32.0% of residents were living in poverty. The poverty rate was 13.3% for White Non-Hispanic residents, 35.6% for Black residents, 33.7% for Hispanic or Latino residents, 66.3% for American Indian residents, 32.9% for other race residents and 29.9% for two or more races residents.[63]

Residents in the town include numerous immigrants from the south of Mexico, whose Amerindian languages include Zapotec, Nahuatl, and Mixtec.[citation needed]

2010 census[edit]

The 2010 United States census counted 25,349 people, 6,265 households, and 4,304 families in the city. The population density was 4,102.5 per square mile (1,584.0/km2). There were 6,782 housing units at an average density of 1,097.6 per square mile (423.8/km2). The racial makeup was 32.64% (8,274) White, 35.49% (8,996) Black or African American, 1.38% (350) Native American, 0.60% (153) Asian, 0.05% (12) Pacific Islander, 25.71% (6,518) from other races, and 4.13% (1,046) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 43.58% (11,046) of the population.[21]

Of the 6,265 households, 40.4% had children under the age of 18; 32.7% were married couples living together; 27.7% had a female householder with no husband present and 31.3% were non-families. Of all households, 25.8% were made up of individuals and 10.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.36 and the average family size was 3.85.[21]

27.9% of the population were under the age of 18, 12.2% from 18 to 24, 34.6% from 25 to 44, 18.1% from 45 to 64, and 7.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 29.7 years. For every 100 females, the population had 135.3 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 151.6 males.[21]

The Census Bureau's 2006–2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $31,044 (with a margin of error of +/− $2,412) and the median family income was $38,750 (+/− $2,233). Males had a median income of $31,202 (+/− $3,369) versus $31,031 (+/− $2,158) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $12,418 (+/− $1,023). About 26.3% of families and 27.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 35.4% of those under age 18 and 15.6% of those age 65 or over.[64]

2000 census[edit]

As of the 2020 U.S. census,[17] there were 22,771 people, 6,182 households, and 4,179 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,659.8 inhabitants per square mile (1,413.1/km2). There were 6,795 housing units at an average density of 1,092.1 per square mile (421.7/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 38.88% White, 41.84% African American, 1.19% Native American, 0.70% Asian, 0.09% Pacific Islander, 13.67% from other races, and 3.63% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 24.49% of the population.[61][62]

There were 6,182 households, out of which 36.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 35.3% were married couples living together, 26.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.4% were non-families. 27.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 13.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.96 and the average family size was 3.49.[61][62]

In the city, the population was spread out, with 26.0% under the age of 18, 11.2% from 18 to 24, 36.0% from 25 to 44, 15.9% from 45 to 64, and 10.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females, there were 130.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 139.1 males.[61][62]

The median income for a household in the city was $26,923, and the median income for a family was $30,502. Males had a median income of $28,858 versus $22,722 for females. The per capita income for the city was $10,917. About 22.7% of families and 26.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 33.3% of those under age 18 and 17.8% of those age 65 or over.[61][62]

Economy[edit]

Portions of Bridgeton are part of an Urban Enterprise Zone. The city was selected in 1983 as one of the initial group of 10 municipalities chosen to participate in the program.[65] In addition to other benefits to encourage employment within the Zone, shoppers can take advantage of a reduced 3.3125% sales tax rate (half of the 6.625% rate charged statewide) at eligible merchants.[66] Established in January 1986, the city's Urban Enterprise Zone status expires in December 2023.[67]

The UEZ program in Bridgeton and four other original UEZ cities had been allowed to lapse as of January 1, 2017, after Governor Chris Christie, who called the program an "abject failure", vetoed a compromise bill that would have extended the status for two years.[68] In May 2018, Governor Phil Murphy signed a law that reinstated the program in these five cities and extended the expiration date in other zones.[69]

Bridgeton is home to Ardagh Group, one of the largest glass production facilities in the state.[70] In 2016, Ardagh Group, Glass – North America became ISO 14001 certified, which recognizes efforts to minimize their impact on the environment, comply with applicable laws and regulations, and work toward continuous environmental improvement.[71]

Government[edit]

Crime[edit]

The Cumberland County Courthouse in Bridgeton in 2006

Bridgeton has consistently had violent crime rates above the national average. They are among the highest in the state, along with Camden, Atlantic City, Newark, and Trenton. In 2015, NeighborhoodScout, a real estate analytics firm, ranked it as the 25th most dangerous city in America. A 2019 report in the Asbury Park Press listed Bridgeton at fifth on its list of the state's ten most dangerous cities.[72] In 2022, based on data from FBI Uniform Crime Reports, Bridgeton had 203 violent crimes, ranked ninth highest among all municipalities in the state.[73]

Local government[edit]

The City of Bridgeton is governed within the Faulkner Act system of municipal government, formally known as the Optional Municipal Charter Law, under Mayor-Council plan A, as implemented on July 1, 1970, based on the recommendations of a Charter Study Commission.[74] The city is one of 71 municipalities (of the 564) statewide governed under this form.[75] The governing body is comprised of a mayor and a five-member City Council. Council members are elected at-large in non-partisan elections and serve concurrent four-year terms of office in balloting held as part of the November general election.[7] Based on the results of an ordinance passed in June 2011, Bridgeton's non-partisan elections were shifted from May to November, which took effect with the November 2014 general election.[76]

The mayor exercises executive power of the municipality and appoints department heads with council approval. The mayor may remove department heads subject to council disapproval by 23 of all members, prepares the budget. The mayor has veto over ordinances, subject to override by 23 of all members of the council. The mayor exercises executive power of the municipality. Up to ten departments may be created under the mayor's direction. A business administrator assists the mayor in budget preparation and administers purchasing and personnel systems. By ordinance, the business administrator may supervise administration of departments, subject to mayor's direction. The City Council exercises legislative power of municipality and approves appointment of department heads. The council may disapprove removal of department heads by 23 vote of all members and can override the mayor's veto by 23 of all members. The council selects one of its own members to serve as its president.[3]

As of 2022, the Mayor is Albert B. Kelly, whose term of office ends on December 31, 2022. Members of the City Council are Council President Edward Bethea, Rosemany DeQuinzio, James Curtis Edwards, David Gonzalez and Marian King (elected to fill an unexpired term), all of whom are serving concurrent terms of office that end December 31, 2022.[3][77][78][79][80]

Marian King was appointed to fill the seat that had been held by Samuel W. Feinstein.[81] King served on an interim basis until the November 2021 general election, when she was elected to serve the balance of the term of office.[79]

Federal, state, and county representation[edit]

Bridgeton is located in the 2nd Congressional District[82] and is part of New Jersey's 3rd state legislative district.[22][83][84]

For the 118th United States Congress, New Jersey's Second Congressional District is represented by Jeff Van Drew (R, Dennis Township).[85] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2027)[86] and Bob Menendez (Harrison, term ends 2025).[87][88]

For the 2022–2023 session, the 3rd Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Edward Durr (R, Logan Township) and in the General Assembly by Bethanne McCarthy-Patrick (R, Mannington Township) and Beth Sawyer (R, Woolwich Township).[89]

Cumberland County is governed by a Board of County Commissioners comprised of seven members who are elected at large by the citizens of Cumberland County in partisan elections and serve staggered three-year terms in office, with either two or three seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle. Each Commissioner is assigned responsibility for one of the county's departments.[90] As of 2022, members of the Cumberland County Board of County Commissioners (with party affiliation, residence and term-end year listed in parentheses) are Commissioner Director Darlene R. Barber (D, Upper Deerfield Township, term as commissioner and as director of the board ends December 31, 2022),[91] Deputy Commissioner Director Donna M. Pearson (D, Bridgeton, term as commissioner ends 2023, term as deputy commissioner director ends 2022),[92] Douglas A. Albrecht (R, Vineland, 2022),[93] George Castellini (D, Vineland, 2023)[94] Carol Musso (D, Deerfield Township, 2023),[95] Antonio Romero (R, Vineland, 2024)[96] and Joseph V. Sileo (R, Vineland, 2024).[97][90][98][99][100][101][102] The county's constitutional officers are Clerk Celeste Riley (D, Bridgeton, 2024),[103][104] Sheriff Robert A. Austino (D, Vineland, 2023)[105][106] and Surrogate Douglas M. Rainear (D, Upper Deerfield Township, 2023).[107][108][98]

The New Jersey Department of Corrections South Woods State Prison is located in Bridgeton. When officials from the City of Bridgeton heard of a state report proposing to move over 1,000 prisoners from Riverfront State Prison in Camden to South Woods, Bridgeton officials opposed the plans.[109]

Politics[edit]

As of March 2011, there were a total of 8,699 registered voters in Bridgeton, of which 2,816 (32.4%) were registered as Democrats, 772 (8.9%) were registered as Republicans and 5,104 (58.7%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 7 voters registered as Libertarians or Greens.[110]

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 81.6% of the vote (4,125 cast), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 17.6% (891 votes), and other candidates with 0.7% (37 votes), among the 5,088 ballots cast by the city's 9,034 registered voters (35 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 56.3%.[111][112] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 77.9% of the vote here (4,238 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain, who received 20.4% (1,111 votes), with 5,440 ballots cast among the city's 8,986 registered voters, for a turnout of 60.5%.[113] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 66.0% of the vote here (3,044 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush, who received 33.6% (1,552 votes), with 4,615 ballots cast among the city's 7,978 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 57.8.[114]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Democrat Barbara Buono received 62.7% of the vote (1,513 cast), ahead of Republican Chris Christie with 35.9% (867 votes), and other candidates with 1.4% (33 votes), among the 2,499 ballots cast by the city's 8,320 registered voters (86 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 30.0%.[115][116] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 67.2% of the vote here (1,806 ballots cast), ahead of both Republican Chris Christie with 24.1% (647 votes) and Independent Chris Daggett with 4.4% (118 votes), with 2,687 ballots cast among the city's 8,524 registered voters, yielding a 31.5% turnout.[117]

Education[edit]

Bridgeton's public schools are operated by Bridgeton Public Schools, which serve students in preschool through twelfth grade. The district is one of 31 former Abbott districts statewide that were established pursuant to the decision by the New Jersey Supreme Court in Abbott v. Burke[118] which are now referred to as "SDA Districts" based on the requirement for the state to cover all costs for school building and renovation projects in these districts under the supervision of the New Jersey Schools Development Authority.[119][120] As of the 2020–21 school year, the district, comprised of eight schools, had an enrollment of 6,313 students and 511.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 12.4:1.[121] Schools in the district (with 2020–21 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[122]) are Geraldine O. Foster Early Childhood Center[123] (308 students in PreK), Broad Street School[124] (936; K-8), Buckshutem Road School[125] (686; K-8), Cherry Street School[126] (558; K-8), ExCEL School[127] (enrollment not listed; K-8), Indian Avenue School[128] (668; K-8), Quarter Mile Lane School[129] (744; PreK-8), West Avenue School,[130] (552; K-8) and Bridgeton High School[131] (1,560; 9-12).[132][133] Students from Downe Township and some students from Lawrence Township attend the district's high school for ninth through twelfth grades as part of sending/receiving relationships; Other students from Lawrence Township are sent to Millville Senior High School.[134][135]

Students are also eligible to attend Cumberland County Technology Education Center in Millville, serving students from the entire county in its full-time technical training programs, which are offered without charge to students who are county residents.[136] Previously the school (formerly Cumberland County Technical Education Center) was a part-time school in Deerfield Township,[137] and it had a Bridgeton postal address.[138] It moved to its current location and became full time in 2016.[137]

Transportation[edit]

Route 77 southbound in Bridgeton

Roads and highways[edit]

As of May 2010, the city had a total of 71.95 miles (115.79 km) of roadways, of which 46.36 miles (74.61 km) were maintained by the municipality, 20.62 miles (33.18 km) by Cumberland County and 4.97 miles (8.00 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[139]

Route 49 and Route 77 are the main highways serving Bridgeton. County Route 552 also traverses the city.

Public transportation[edit]

NJ Transit offers service on the 410 route between Bridgeton and Philadelphia, and the 553 route between Upper Deerfield Township and Atlantic City.[140][141]

There is also a shuttle along Landis Avenue to Vineland and a local shuttle that circulates between Bridgeton and Upper Deerfield Township.[142]

Airports[edit]

Bucks Airport is located 3.5 miles (5.6 km) northeast of the central business district of Bridgeton.[143] Li Calzi Airport, which was located 2.3 miles (3.7 km) south of the central business district of Bridgeton, closed in 2008.[citation needed]

Places of interest[edit]

Old Broad Street Presbyterian

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Bridgeton include:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e 2019 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 1, 2020.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ a b c Mayor and City Council, Bridgeton, New Jersey. Accessed April 21, 2022. "The City of Bridgeton is governed by the Faulkner Act system of municipal government under 'Mayor-Council plan A', as implemented on July 1, 1970, based on the recommendations of a Charter Study Commission. Under this structure, voters elect a Mayor and five City Council members. In Bridgeton, Council members are elected 'at-large' in non-partisan elections and serve four-year concurrent terms. The Council elects one of its own members to serve as Council President".
  4. ^ 2022 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed March 1, 2022.
  5. ^ Department of Administration, City of Bridgeton. Accessed April 21, 2022.
  6. ^ City Clerk, City of Bridgeton. Accessed April 21, 2022.
  7. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 19.
  8. ^ "ArcGIS REST Services Directory". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 11, 2022.
  9. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: City of Bridgeton, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 4, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c d e QuickFacts Bridgeton city, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 19, 2022.
  11. ^ a b c Total Population: Census 2010 - Census 2020 New Jersey Municipalities, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed December 1, 2022.
  12. ^ a b Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Minor Civil Divisions in New Jersey: April 1, 2020 to July 1, 2021, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 1, 2022.
  13. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey , United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 11, 2012.
  14. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Bridgeton, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed December 1, 2011.
  15. ^ ZIP Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed October 7, 2013.
  16. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Bridgeton, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 7, 2013.
  17. ^ a b U.S. Census website , United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  18. ^ Geographic Codes Lookup for New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed April 1, 2022.
  19. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  20. ^ New Jersey County Map, New Jersey Department of State. Accessed December 22, 2022.
  21. ^ a b c d e DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Bridgeton city, Cumberland County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2012.
  22. ^ a b c Municipalities Sorted by 2011-2020 Legislative District, New Jersey Department of State. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  23. ^ a b Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Bridgeton city Archived 2012-04-30 at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed July 9, 2012.
  24. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010 Archived August 7, 2017, at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed July 9, 2012.
  25. ^ New Jersey: 2020 Core Based Statistical Areas and Counties, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 22, 2022.
  26. ^ "Here are the 30 N.J. towns with the highest property tax rates", NJ Advance Media for NJ.com, March 15, 2021. Accessed January 19, 2022. "The average equalized tax rate in New Jersey was 2.279 in 2020, according to data from the Department of Community Affairs. Here is the list of 30 New Jersey towns with the highest property tax rates.... 13. Bridgeton Equalized tax rate in Bridgeton, Cumberland County, was 4.598 in 2020 Average equalized tax rate in Cumberland County: 3.089"
  27. ^ Marine, Jaime. "Annual Nanticoke Lenni-Lenape Pow-Wow coming to Salem County Fairgrounds", Today's Sunbeam, June 9, 2010. Accessed July 9, 2012. "'The main purpose of the Pow-Wow is to educate the American public about the rich history of the Native Americans,' Gail Gould, of the Nanticoke Lenni-Lenape Tribal Office in Bridgeton, said Wednesday. 'It is also like a big family reunion for us.' According to Gould, there are more than 12,000 members of the Lenape tribe throughout Salem, Gloucester and Cumberland counties."
  28. ^ Historic Bridgeton Walking Tour; New Jersey's Largest Historic District, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed November 8, 2016.
  29. ^ "The History and Statistics of American Water-Works". Engineering News-record. January 7, 1882. Retrieved March 16, 2021.
  30. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 119. Accessed July 9, 2012.
  31. ^ Hutchinson, Viola L. The Origin of New Jersey Place Names, New Jersey Public Library Commission, May 1945. Accessed August 27, 2015.
  32. ^ Gannett, Henry. The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States, p. 37. United States Government Printing Office, 1905. Accessed August 27, 2015.
  33. ^ a b Staff. "Rites for Oberlin Smith Held.", The New York Times, July 22, 1926. Accessed July 8, 2012. "The funeral of Oberlin Smith, Bridgeton's most distinguished citizen and inventor of international note, took place this afternoon from Lockwold, his late residence on the shore of East Lake."
  34. ^ Staff. "Bridgeton Historic District / Managing the past", The Press of Atlantic City, November 6, 2007. Accessed July 8, 2012. "Funkhouser's story mirrors the problems facing the entire historic district in Bridgeton. Drawn up in 1982, the district covers almost a quarter of the city and is the largest contiguous historic district in the state."
  35. ^ Arney, Pat. "Preserving Bridgeton's History / Historical Society Says Potter's Tavern Needs A Lot Of Work", The Press of Atlantic City, August 26, 1993. Accessed July 9, 2012. "It was New Jersey's first newspaper. Called the "Plain Dealer," the hand-written paper came out weekly between Dec. 25, 1775, and Feb. 12, 1776, at Potter's Tavern, a gathering spot for the local firebrands that still stands today, across from the Cumberland County Courthouse on West Broad Street."
  36. ^ Cumberland Bank Building, New Jersey Historic Trust. Accessed July 9, 2012.
  37. ^ Cousteau Center at Bridgeton Archived 2010-07-12 at the Wayback Machine, Rutgers University Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences. Accessed July 9, 2012.
  38. ^ Our History, City of Bridgeton. Accessed October 28, 2019.
  39. ^ Parks and Recreation, City of Bridgeton. Accessed November 8, 2016.
  40. ^ Cohanzick Zoo... "New Jersey's First Zoo" , City of Bridgeton. Accessed November 8, 2016.
  41. ^ New Jersey School Performance Report for the Bridgeton School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed May 31, 2015.
  42. ^ Zotigh, Dennis. "Meet Native America: Mark Gould, Chief of the Nanticoke Lenni-Lenape Tribal Nation", National Museum of the American Indian, September 6, 2016. Accessed October 28, 2019.
  43. ^ STEAMWorks, City of Bridgeton. Accessed June 9, 2017.
  44. ^ Adomaitis, Greg. "Bridgeton Main Street president receives inaugural award", South Jersey Times, February 2, 2012. Accessed May 31, 2015. "Fellow BMSA members and co-workers turned their attention to their president and member of five years, who leads the oldest Main Street association in the state.... The Main Street effort was instituted nationally around the late-1970s and was officially incorporated here in 1990."
  45. ^ Cousteau Center at Bridgeton, Cousteau Center at Bridgeton. Accessed October 7, 2013.
  46. ^ Barlas, Thomas. "Cumberland County banking on prisons for economic stability", The Press of Atlantic City, July 3, 2013. Accessed October 7, 2013. "Those prisoners - the county will accept between 100 and 350, depending on space - will join thousands of inmates lodged in three state prisons located in Cumberland County. Bayside State Prison and Southern State Correctional Facility in Maurice River Township and South Woods State Prison in Bridgeton house about a third of the more than 23,100 inmates in all of the state's prisons."
  47. ^ Driving Directions, Rutgers Food Innovation Center. Accessed June 9, 2017.
  48. ^ Locality Search, State of New Jersey. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  49. ^ Areas touching Bridgeton, MapIt. Accessed March 21, 2020.
  50. ^ Map of Cumberland County, New Jersey Department of Transportation. Accessed October 28, 2019.
  51. ^ New Jersey Municipal Boundaries, New Jersey Department of Transportation. Accessed November 15, 2019.
  52. ^ Climate Summary for Bridgeton, New Jersey
  53. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Cumberland County Municipalities, 1810 - 2000, West Jersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed July 9, 2012.
  54. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed October 7, 2013.
  55. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 269, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed October 7, 2013. "Bridgeton, the county town, contains three wards, and is located in Bridgeton township. Its population in 1850 was 2,446; in 1860, 3,595; and in 1870, 6,830. Previous to 1747, it formed a portion of Salem county "
  56. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 258. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed October 7, 2013.
  57. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 97. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed October 7, 2013.
  58. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 336. Accessed October 7, 2013.
  59. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, p. 710, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 1, 2011.
  60. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990 Archived May 10, 2015, at the Wayback Machine, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network. Accessed June 28, 2015.
  61. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Bridgeton city Archived 2008-07-24 at the Wayback Machine, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2012.
  62. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Bridgeton city, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2012.
  63. ^ Bridgeton, New Jersey, City-data.com. Accessed June 9, 2017.
  64. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Bridgeton city, Cumberland County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2012.
  65. ^ Urban Enterprise Zone Tax Questions and Answers, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs, May 2009. Accessed October 28, 2019. "The Urban Enterprise Zone Program (UEZ) was enacted in 1983. It authorized the designation of ten zones by the New Jersey Urban Enterprise Zone Authority: Camden, Newark, Bridgeton, Trenton, Plainfield, Elizabeth, Jersey City, Kearny, Orange and Millville/Vineland (joint zone)."
  66. ^ Urban Enterprise Zone Program, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed October 27, 2019. "Businesses participating in the UEZ Program can charge half the standard sales tax rate on certain purchases, currently 3.3125% effective 1/1/2018"
  67. ^ Urban Enterprise Zone Effective and Expiration Dates, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed January 8, 2018.
  68. ^ Racioppi, Dustin. "Christie vetoes urban enterprise zone extension", The Record, February 10, 2017. Accessed November 19, 2019. "Gov. Chris Christie on Friday conditionally vetoed the Legislature's attempt to extend the Urban Enterprise Zone status for its five charter communities, calling the economic revitalization program an 'abject failure' with a 'devastating impact' on state revenue.... The Legislature returned with what it called a compromise bill, A-4189, to extend the designation for two years instead of 10 for the first five UEZs -- Bridgeton, Camden, Newark, Plainfield and Trenton -- which expired on Jan. 1."
  69. ^ "Notice: Law Reinstates Five Urban Enterprise Zones And Also Extends The Expiration Date Of 12 Other UEZs", New Jersey Department of the Treasury Division of Taxation, May 30, 2018. Accessed November 19, 2019. "On May 30, 2018, Governor Murphy signed Senate Bill 846 (A3549). The law reinstated five expired Urban Enterprise Zones (UEZs). If your business is located in one of these zones, you may file an application to establish qualified business status. (Past certifications are no longer valid in these five zones). The five UEZs are in: *Bridgeton *Camden *Newark *Plainfield *Trenton. The UEZs in the five locations listed above expire on December 31, 2023."
  70. ^ Our Locations, Ardagh Group. Accessed January 8, 2021.
  71. ^ "Ardagh Group Manufacturing Facility Achieves ISO 14001:2004 Certification" Ardagh Group, Glass – North America, a division of Ardagh Group and a leading producer of glass containers for the food and beverage industries in the United States, announced that its Bridgeton, NJ., facility achieved ISO 14001:2004 certification."
  72. ^ "NJ's 10 most dangerous cities listed in new ranking. Here's who made the list.", Asbury Park Press, October 25, 2019. Accessed January 19, 2023. "No. 5: Bridgeton In fifth-ranked Bridgeton, violent and property crime rates have both increased approximately 11% between 2015-17, according to the report."
  73. ^ "The Most Dangerous Places To Be In New Jersey", WJLK, October 24, 2022. Accessed January 19, 2023.
  74. ^ "The Faulkner Act: New Jersey's Optional Municipal Charter Law" Archived October 12, 2013, at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey State League of Municipalities, July 2007. Accessed October 7, 2013.
  75. ^ Inventory of Municipal Forms of Government in New Jersey, Rutgers University Center for Government Studies, July 1, 2011. Accessed November 18, 2019.
  76. ^ City Code Chapter 19: Elections, City of Bridgeton. Accessed March 18, 2018. "In accordance with N.J.S.A. 40:45-5 et seq., the 'Uniform Nonpartisan Election Law,' after January 1, 2011, election of municipal officers will be held at regular general elections to be held on the Tuesday after the first Monday in November."
  77. ^ 2021 Municipal Data Sheet, Bridgeton, New Jersey. Accessed April 21, 2022.
  78. ^ 2021 Directory of Cumberland County, New Jersey, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed May 1, 2022.
  79. ^ a b Election Summary Report General Election Cumberland County November 2, 2021, Cumberland County, New Jersey, updated November 19, 2021. Accessed January 1, 2022.
  80. ^ November 6, 2018 General Election Official Results, Cumberland County, New Jersey, updated November 19, 2018. Accessed October 1, 2019.
  81. ^ Marian King, City of Bridgeton. Accessed April 21, 2022. "Councilwoman Marian King is a lifelong resident of the Bridgeton community. A strong proponent for quality education in Bridgeton, Councilwoman King served on the Bridgeton School Board prior to being selected to replace former Councilman Sam Feinstein."
  82. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  83. ^ 2019 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed October 30, 2019.
  84. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  85. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 3, 2019.
  86. ^ U.S. Sen. Cory Booker cruises past Republican challenger Rik Mehta in New Jersey, PhillyVoice. Accessed April 30, 2021. "He now owns a home and lives in Newark's Central Ward community."
  87. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate, January 26, 2015. "Menendez, who started his political career in Union City, moved in September from Paramus to one of Harrison's new apartment buildings near the town's PATH station.."
  88. ^ Home, sweet home: Bob Menendez back in Hudson County. nj.com. Accessed April 30, 2021. "Booker, Cory A. - (D - NJ) Class II; Menendez, Robert - (D - NJ) Class I"
  89. ^ Legislative Roster for District 3, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 11, 2022.
  90. ^ a b Board of County Commissioners, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed February 27, 2022. "By law, Cumberland County is allowed 7 County Commissioners, who serve staggered, overlapping three-year terms. Two are elected in two successive years, three in the third year, elected from the county at-large, for three year, overlapping terms. A Director of the Board is selected by their colleagues for a one-year term. Each County Commissioner is charged with responsibility for one or more of the county's seven departments."
  91. ^ Darlene Barber, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed February 23, 2022.
  92. ^ Donna M. Pearson, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed February 23, 2022.
  93. ^ Douglas Albrecht, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed February 23, 2022.
  94. ^ George Castellini, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed February 23, 2022.
  95. ^ Carol Musso, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed February 23, 2022.
  96. ^ Antonio Romero, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed February 24, 2022.
  97. ^ Joseph V. Sileo, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed February 23, 2022.
  98. ^ a b 2021 Directory of Cumberland County, New Jersey, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed February 27, 2022.
  99. ^ 2021 County Data Sheet, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed February 27, 2022.
  100. ^ Election Summary Report General Election November 2, 2021, Cumberland County, New Jersey, updated November 19, 2021. Accessed January 1, 2022.
  101. ^ General Election November 3, 2020 Official Results, Cumberland County, New Jersey, updated November 19, 2020. Accessed January 1, 2021.
  102. ^ November 5, 2019 General Election Official Results, Cumberland County, New Jersey, updated November 14, 2019. Accessed January 1, 2020.
  103. ^ County Clerk: Celeste M. Riley, Cumberland County Clerk's Office. Accessed February 27, 2022.
  104. ^ Members List: Clerks, Constitutional Officers Association of New Jersey. Accessed February 27, 2022.
  105. ^ Sheriff's Office, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed February 27, 2022.
  106. ^ Members List: Sheriffs, Constitutional Officers Association of New Jersey. Accessed February 27, 2022.
  107. ^ Cumberland County Surrogate Office, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed February 27, 2022.
  108. ^ Members List: Surrogates, Constitutional Officers Association of New Jersey. Accessed February 27, 2022.
  109. ^ Martins, John. "Bridgeton doesn't want Camden's state inmates." The Press of Atlantic City. May 23, 2007. Accessed September 27, 2011. "City officials on Tuesday night condemned what they say is a state plan to relocate more than 1,000 inmates from Camden's Riverfront State Prison to one of the county's three state prisons."
  110. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Cumberland, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed October 22, 2012.
  111. ^ "Presidential General Election Results - November 6, 2012 - Cumberland County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. March 15, 2013. Retrieved December 24, 2014.
  112. ^ "Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast - November 6, 2012 - General Election Results - Cumberland County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. March 15, 2013. Retrieved December 24, 2014.
  113. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Cumberland County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed October 22, 2012.
  114. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Cumberland County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed October 22, 2012.
  115. ^ "Governor - Cumberland County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. January 29, 2014. Retrieved December 24, 2014.
  116. ^ "Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast - November 5, 2013 - General Election Results - Cumberland County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. January 29, 2014. Retrieved December 24, 2014.
  117. ^ 2009 Governor: Cumberland County Archived 2016-07-07 at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed October 22, 2012.
  118. ^ What We Do: History, New Jersey Schools Development Authority. Accessed March 1, 2022. "In 1998, the New Jersey Supreme Court ruled in the Abbott v. Burke case that the State must provide 100 percent funding for all school renovation and construction projects in special-needs school districts. According to the Court, aging, unsafe and overcrowded buildings prevented children from receiving the "thorough and efficient" education required under the New Jersey Constitution.... Full funding for approved projects was authorized for the 31 special-needs districts, known as 'Abbott Districts'."
  119. ^ What We Do, New Jersey Schools Development Authority. Accessed March 1, 2022.
  120. ^ SDA Districts, New Jersey Schools Development Authority. Accessed March 1, 2022.
  121. ^ District information for Bridgeton City School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed February 15, 2022.
  122. ^ School Data for the Bridgeton Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed February 25, 2022.
  123. ^ Geraldine O. Foster Early Childhood Center, Bridgeton Public Schools. Accessed September 1, 2022.
  124. ^ Broad Street School, Bridgeton Public Schools. Accessed September 1, 2022.
  125. ^ Buckshutem Road School, Bridgeton Public Schools. Accessed September 1, 2022.
  126. ^ Cherry Street School, Bridgeton Public Schools. Accessed September 1, 2022.
  127. ^ ExCEL School, Bridgeton Public Schools. Accessed September 1, 2022.
  128. ^ Indian Avenue School, Bridgeton Public Schools. Accessed September 1, 2022.
  129. ^ Quarter Mile Lane School, Bridgeton Public Schools. Accessed September 1, 2022.
  130. ^ West Avenue School, Bridgeton Public Schools. Accessed September 1, 2022.
  131. ^ Bridgeton High School, Bridgeton Public Schools. Accessed September 1, 2022.
  132. ^ School Performance Reports for the Bridgeton City School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed September 1, 2022.
  133. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Bridgeton Public Schools, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed December 29, 2016.
  134. ^ Region Profile - Western/Southern Cumberland Region Strategic Plan Archived 2014-02-22 at the Wayback Machine, Cumberland Development Corporation, January 2003. Accessed December 21, 2014. "Students in grades 9-12 residing in Commercial, Maurice River and a portion of Lawrence Townships attend Millville High School. Students in Bridgeton, Downe and a portion of Lawrence Township attend Bridgeton High School."
  135. ^ Staff. "Bridgeton High School", South Jersey magazine. Accessed December 21, 2014. "Bridgeton High School provides opportunities for students from Bridgeton, Lawrence Township and Downe Township in Cumberland County to become members of society who are thoughtful, informed, involved and committed to life-long learning."
  136. ^ Admissions Booklet, Cumberland County Technology Education Center. Accessed December 20, 2022. "Who Can Apply? Applicants must be enrolled in 8th grade and live in Cumberland County."
  137. ^ a b Woods, Don E. "Tour Cumberland County tech school's new $70M campus", NJ.com, August 16, 2016. Accessed October 15, 2017. "The former CCTEC building is located in Deerfield Township [...]"
  138. ^ "Home". Cumberland County Technical Education Center. Archived from the original on January 25, 1998. Retrieved April 1, 2021. 601 Bridgeton Avenue, Bridgeton, NJ 08302 - Note that despite the "Bridgeton, NJ" address the college was not in the Bridgeton limits.
    Compare to: "CENSUS 2000 BLOCK MAP: DEERFIELD Township" (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved April 2, 2021.
  139. ^ Cumberland County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 18, 2014.
  140. ^ South Jersey Transit Guide Archived 2018-09-29 at the Wayback Machine, Cross County Connection, as of April 1, 2010. Accessed December 15, 2014.
  141. ^ Transportation Plan Cumberland County, NJ, Cumberland County Planning Board, March 2013. Accessed October 31, 2019.
  142. ^ Transit, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2021.
  143. ^ Bucks Airport, AirNav.com. Accessed August 8, 2019.
  144. ^ Old Broad Street Church Archived 2016-01-19 at the Wayback Machine, First Presbyterian Church of Bridgeton, NJ. Accessed November 8, 2016. "This was the first church erected in Bridge Town; the cornerstone was laid in 1792. It was finished and first used for worship in 1795, but not before funds were raised by a state-wide lottery to complete the building. "
  145. ^ Potter's Tavern, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed November 8, 2016.
  146. ^ The Plain Dealer, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed November 8, 2016.
  147. ^ Chestnut, Bill. Bridgeton: In and Around the Old County Town, p. 34. Arcadia Publishing, 1996. ISBN 9780752404677. Accessed October 7, 2013.
  148. ^ New Sweden Farmstead Museum Archived 2013-09-02 at the Wayback Machine, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed October 7, 2013.
  149. ^ Colman, David. "His Guiding Light? Mom, of Course", The New York Times, December 7, 2012. Accessed December 9, 2012. "One might guess that Mr. Adler, 46, who studied semiotics at Brown University and ceramics at the Rhode Island School of Design, had developed his careful balancing act of cynicism and sincerity — cynicerity, for short — as an adult. But, it turns out, he had a lucky star guiding him right from the day he was born. A wholly artificial star, of course: the chandelier that hung above his family's dining table in their house in Bridgeton, N.J."
  150. ^ Bridegton's Notable People: Jonathan Adler, City of Bridgeton. Accessed October 28, 2019.
  151. ^ Ryquell Armstead, Temple Owls football. Accessed August 8, 2019. "Born Ryquell Keeman Armstead (pronounced: ra-KWELL) in Bridgeton, N.J."
  152. ^ Radcliffe Bailey: Memory As Medicine, High Museum of Art. Accessed February 13, 2020. "Born in 1968 in Bridgeton, New Jersey, Radcliffe Bailey moved to Atlanta when he was four years old."
  153. ^ Freeman, Joseph H. Twenty-Second Biennial Report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction of the State of Illinois; July 1, 1896 - June 30, 1898, p. 69. The Superintendent, 1898. Accessed December 21, 2014. "Newton Bateman, of English ancestry, was born in Bridgeton, county seat of a southern county of New Jersey, July 27, 1822, and was a little over seventy-five years old at his death October 21, 1897."
  154. ^ Markquese Bell, NFL.com. Accessed September 1, 2022. "Hometown: Bridgeton, NJ"
  155. ^ "U.S. Ambassador to the Dominican Republic: Who Is Robin Bernstein?", AllGov.com, November 13, 2017. Accessed August 10, 2018. "Born in 1953, Robin Stein Bernstein is from Bridgeton, New Jersey, and graduated from Bridgeton High School in 1972 after spending her junior year as an exchange student in Paris."
  156. ^ Ella Reeve Bloor, Encyclopædia Britannica. Accessed September 24, 2007.
  157. ^ Bridegton's Notable People: Ella Reeve Bloor, City of Bridgeton. Accessed October 28, 2019.
  158. ^ Bodine, Frank Lee (1874-1964), Philadelphia Architects and Buildings. Accessed December 21, 2014. "Frank L. Bodine was born in Bridgeton, NJ, the son of J. Nixon and Annie Alexander Millikan Bodine."
  159. ^ Brown, Charles, (1797 - 1883), Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed December 21, 2014. "born in Philadelphia, Pa., September 23, 1797; attended the public schools; in early boyhood moved with his father to Cumberland County, N.J., and resided near Bridgeton"
  160. ^ "Breaking new ground with environmental pioneer, Lester R. Brown", WHYY-FM, December 12, 2013. Accessed December 21, 2014.
  161. ^ Benjamin Champneys, Pennsylvania State Senate. Accessed August 8, 2019. "Born in Bridgeton, New Jersey January 1800"
  162. ^ Brown, Scott. "Bridgeton's Davy Runs Wild At States The Jamaica Native Set Records In The 200 And 400. Her Coach Thinks She Will Only Improve.", The Philadelphia Inquirer, June 1, 1998. Accessed December 21, 2014. "That's because Bridgeton's Nadia Davy eclipsed their times in the 200 and 400 to set both records."
  163. ^ McGarry, Michael. "Bridgeton's Braheme Days Jr. third in shot put at World Junior Track and Field Championships", The Press of Atlantic City, July 24, 2014. Accessed December 21, 2014. "Bridgeton's Braheme Days Jr. finished third Thursday night in the shot put at the IAAF World Junior Track and Championships in Eugene, Ore.... Days Jr., a 2013 Bridgeton High School graduate, put himself in position to win the world title by finishing first in his heat and second overall with a throw of 64 feet, 4 inches in the preliminaries."
  164. ^ Lucius Quintius Cincinnatus Elmer, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed August 20, 2007.
  165. ^ Bridegton's Notable People: Lucius Elmer, City of Bridgeton. Accessed October 28, 2019.
  166. ^ Cyclopedia of New Jersey Biography, Memorial and Biographical, Volume 1, p. 126. American Historical Society, Incorporated, 1921. Accessed August 8, 2019. "Charles Ewing, LL.D., was born in 1780, in Bridgeton, Cumberland county, New Jersey, the only son of James and Martha (Boyd) Ewing."
  167. ^ Assembly Member Douglas H. Fisher, Project Vote Smart. Accessed August 8, 2007.
  168. ^ Bridegton's Notable People: Douglas H. Fisher, City of Bridgeton. Accessed October 28, 2019.
  169. ^ Hummel, Jack. "The Story of Bridgeton: Joan Dare Ballinger's Bridgeton", South Jersey Times, December 12, 2011. Accessed December 21, 2014. "James Galanos, the known clothes designer, had a restaurant downtown and we'd always have lunch before we went back to work with the money."
  170. ^ Bridegton's Notable People: James Galanos, City of Bridgeton. Accessed October 28, 2019.
  171. ^ News Journal of Mansfield, Ohio, January 29, 1968.
  172. ^ Bridegton's Notable People: Goose Goslin, City of Bridgeton. Accessed October 28, 2019.
  173. ^ Scannell, John James. Scannell's New Jersey's First Citizens and State Guide: Biographies of the Notable Living Men and Women of New Jersey with informing glimpses into the State's History, Affairs, Officialism and Institutions 1919-1920 (Volume II), p. 198. J. J. Scannell, 1919. Accessed November 30, 2013. "Edward E Grosscup - Wenonah - Real Estate. Born in Bridgeton, August 2, 1860; son of Charles C. and Anna D. Grosscup."
  174. ^ James Giles Hampton, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed August 25, 2007
  175. ^ Colonel Charles L. Harris, 11th Wisconsin Civil War Regiment, July 9, 2007. Accessed October 22, 2012. "Charles L. Harris, born August 24, 1834 in Bridgeton, New Jersey, was a prominent Madison resident when the war broke out."
  176. ^ Bridegton's Notable People: Charles L. Harris, City of Bridgeton. Accessed October 28, 2019.
  177. ^ Smith, Harrison. "Charles Hill, diplomat, Yale professor and top adviser to George Shultz, dies at 84", The Washington Post, March 30, 2021. Accessed April 5, 2021. "Morton Charles Hill was born in Bridgeton, N.J., on April 28, 1936. His father was a dentist, his mother a homemaker."
  178. ^ Class of 1904 - Rutgers College - History to 1907, p. 12. Accessed December 21, 2014. "Alfred Ellet Hitchner. ... Before entering college lived at Clayton, N. J., and Bridgeton, N. J. Prepared at Bridgeton High School and West Jersey Academy."
  179. ^ Weinberg, David. "Pro Football / Surprise! Bridgeton Celebrates George Jamison's Long NFL Career", The Press of Atlantic City, August 22, 2000. Accessed October 22, 2012. "One of the reasons George Jamison was able to play in the NFL for 13 seasons was that he was seldom surprised. As an outside linebacker for the Detroit Lions and Kansas City Chiefs, the Bridgeton native was rarely caught out of position, even when faced with the most creative trick plays."
  180. ^ George Jamison player profile Archived 2007-09-30 at the Wayback Machine, database Football. Accessed July 29, 2007.
  181. ^ Bridegton's Notable People: George Jamison, City of Bridgeton. Accessed October 28, 2019.
  182. ^ via Associated Press. "Yanks Swamp 'Hawks, 31-0", St. Petersburg Times, December 10, 1946. Accessed June 7, 2011. "The Yanks opened the scoring midway in the first quarter when Harvey Johnson, of Bridgeton, N. J., booted a field goal between the uprights from the Miami 45 yard line."
  183. ^ Bridegton's Notable People: Harvey Johnson, City of Bridgeton. Accessed October 28, 2019.
  184. ^ Adams, Stephen J. The Patriot Poets: American Odes, Progress Poems, and the State of the Union, p. 392. McGill–Queen's University Press, 2018. ISBN 9780773555952. Accessed August 8, 2019. "Benjamin F. Lee was born 18 September 1841 in Bridgeton, New Jersey."
  185. ^ Biography, C. Carwood Lipton. Accessed November 25, 2017. "In 1966, he moved to Bridgeton, New Jersey where he became an Administrative Manager, and in 1971, he and his wife moved to London where he was the Director of Manufacturing for eight different glass companies in England and Scotland for several years."
  186. ^ Frank A. Lobiondo, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed August 8, 2007.
  187. ^ Bridegton's Notable People: Frank LoBiondo, City of Bridgeton. Accessed October 28, 2019.
  188. ^ Koffman, Jack. "Newest Rider here air express - Vrison Manor to face Esimos", Ottawa Citizen, September 17, 1975. Accessed October 22, 2012. "GM Frank Clair spoke to Manor, a graduate of University of Arkansas, yesterday morning at his home in Bridgeton, New Jersey, and arranged to have him fly here immediately."
  189. ^ Brison Manor Archived 2007-02-09 at the Wayback Machine, database Football. Accessed October 24, 2007.
  190. ^ Bridegton's Notable People: Brison Manor, City of Bridgeton. Accessed October 28, 2019.
  191. ^ "Bloomfield Minch Dies; Ex-Head of N.J. Senate". The Morning Post. Vol. 54, no. 127. Camden, N.J. June 26, 1929. p. 3 – via Newspapers.com.
  192. ^ Bishop, Bill. Rube Oldring, Society for American Baseball Research. Accessed November 25, 2017. "Rube suffered a heart attack in 1960, and died at age 77 on September 9, 1961 at his home in Bridgeton, New Jersey from acute blockage of the arteries."
  193. ^ Sims, Gayle Ronan. "Harold E. Pierce Jr., 84, dermatologist, surgeon", The Philadelphia Inquirer, November 4, 2006. Accessed December 21, 2014. "He was born in the Art Museum area, and his mother died when he was 7. His father decided the best situation for his son was to be raised by his paternal grandparents in Bridgeton, N.J. He graduated from Bridgeton High School in 1939 and earned a bachelor's degree in science in 1943 from Lincoln University and a medical degree in 1946 from Howard University."
  194. ^ "Colorado Rapids Deal Steve Rammel To Metrostars For 1999 First-Round Supplemental Draft Choice" Archived 2007-10-07 at the Wayback Machine, SoccerNews Online, March 5, 1998. Accessed May 23, 2008.
  195. ^ Bridegton's Notable People: Steve Rammel, City of Bridgeton. Accessed October 28, 2019.
  196. ^ Floyd Reid, The Pro Football Archives. Accessed December 21, 2014.
  197. ^ County Clerk: Celeste M. Riley, Cumberland County Clerk's Office. Accessed October 28, 2019. "Prior to joining the NJ Assembly, Celeste Riley served as a member of Bridgeton City Council and rose to become the Council President. One of her most notable accomplishments was establishing 'Building a Better Bridgeton', which was a beautification project for the aging industrial foundations of Bridgeton."
  198. ^ Bridegton's Notable People: Celester Riley, City of Bridgeton. Accessed October 28, 2019.
  199. ^ New Jersey Governor Elias Pettit Seeley, National Governors Association. Accessed November 25, 2017. "Elias P. Seeley, the fourteenth governor of New Jersey, was born in Bridgeton, New Jersey on November 10, 1791."
  200. ^ Bridegton's Notable People: Elias P. Seeley, City of Bridgeton. Accessed October 28, 2019.
  201. ^ Oberlin Smith: Biography, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Global History Network. Accessed November 2, 2010.
  202. ^ Bridegton's Notable People: Oberlin Smith, City of Bridgeton. Accessed October 28, 2019.
  203. ^ Staff. "John Spoltore Dies at 52; G.O.P. Chairman of Jersey", The New York Times, December 12, 1973. Accessed December 21, 2014. "John Spoltore, Republican state chairman, died early today of a heart attack at St. Francis Hospital. He was 52 years old and lived in Bridgeton, where he served as Mayor from 1953 to 1957."
  204. ^ Lundy, F. L., et al. Fitzgerald's Legislative Manual, State of New Jersey, Volume 134, p. 375. Accessed August 8, 2019. "Thomas Whitaker Trenchard, Bridgeton. Justice Trenchard was born in Centreton, Salem county, N. J., December 13, 1863."
  205. ^ Taniguchi, lauren T. "Forbes 30 Under 30 list features technology leader Aharon Wasserman of Bridgeton", South Jersey Times, December 20, 2011. Accessed December 21, 2014. "Alongside young virtuosos like Lady Gaga, LeBron James and the Olsen twins, Bridgeton's own Aharon Wasserman is featured as one to watch."
  206. ^ Van Embden, Edward. "Bridgeton woman combines teaching, gospel to help girls pursue dreams", The Press of Atlantic City, August 19, 2010. Accessed August 8, 2019. "Melinda Watts left Bridgeton to pursue her dream, and now she's returning to share it."
  207. ^ Graves-El, Ahmad. "Bridgeton Native, Dominique Williams, Returns with Life Lessons for the Next Generation", SNJ Today, July 9, 2019. Accessed August 8, 2019. "Bridgeton has been the home of many outstanding and upstanding citizens throughout its history.... Dominique Williams is another elite athlete who hails from the historic town."
  208. ^ Hadden, Doug. "Bridgeton Athlete Takes 3 Events In Girls' Track", The Philadelphia Inquirer, May 8, 1988. Accessed December 21, 2014. "Bridgeton High's Shana Williams won three events, and Kingsway was an easy winner in the team competition, highlighting yesterday's 16th annual Pennsauken-South Jersey Open track meet for girls."
  209. ^ Woods, Don E. "Jason Winrow - Cumberland Regional alum, Ohio State Buckeye and New York Giant - passes away at 41", NJ.com, September 24, 2012. Accessed October 2, 2017. "Winrow was a born in Bridgeton and made a name for himself on the football field. Winrow was the second student in Cumberland Regional High School's history to attend a Division I university on a full football scholarship when he went to Ohio State University from 1989-1993."
  210. ^ Roberts, Sam. "H. Boyd Woodruff, Microbiologist Who Paved Way for Antibiotics, Dies at 99", The New York Times, February 3, 2017. Accessed February 4, 2017. "Harold Boyd Woodruff, known as Boyd, was born on July 22, 1917, in Bridgeton, N.J."

Further reading[edit]

  • Watson, Penelope S. "Bridgeton, New Jersey". The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia. Rutgers University. Retrieved March 21, 2018.

External links[edit]

Official website Edit this at Wikidata