Brigham City, Arizona

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Brigham City
Ghost town
BRINGHAM CITY.jpg
Brigham City is located in Arizona
Brigham City
Brigham City
Location in the state of Arizona
Coordinates: 35°02′31″N 110°41′04″W / 35.04194°N 110.68444°W / 35.04194; -110.68444Coordinates: 35°02′31″N 110°41′04″W / 35.04194°N 110.68444°W / 35.04194; -110.68444
Country  United States
State  Arizona
County Navajo
Founded 1876
Abandoned 1881
Named for Brigham Young
Elevation[1] 4,895 ft (1,492 m)
Time zone MST (no DST) (UTC-7)
Area code(s)
Brigham City
Brigham City, Arizona is located in Arizona
Brigham City, Arizona
Brigham City, Arizona is located in the US
Brigham City, Arizona
Nearest city Winslow, Arizona
Area 160 acres (65 ha)
Built 1876
NRHP Reference # 78000558[2]
Added to NRHP June 9, 1978

Brigham City is a ghost town in Navajo County, Arizona, United States. Founded by Latter-day Saints near the present city of Winslow in 1876, it was one and one-half miles north of Winslow's current city center, along the Little Colorado River. It was organized as a Latter-Day Saints ward in 1878, but by 1881 it had been abandoned.[3][4]

Twenty Mormon families and fifteen bachelors from Salt Lake City settled the area, and built homes inside protective walls originally measuring 200 feet (61 m) long and 7 feet (2.1 m) high. Flash flooding that washed away the dams and irrigation systems led to crop failures and caused the abandonment of the town by 1881.[5]

The US Census listed its population as 191 in 1880.[6]

Brigham City was one of four Little Colorado River colonies.[7] The other colonies were Joseph City, Sunset, and Obed. Joseph City is the only remaining colony.[8]

Brigham City was added to the National Register of Historic Places as of June 9, 1978,[9] and the remnants are currently undergoing restoration.[4] Only one of the communities' buildings and portions of the encircling wall remain.

Archaeological excavations have been carried out at the location of the grist mill, the pottery, and other features [10][11]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Brigham City (historical)
  2. ^ National Park Service (2009-03-13). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  3. ^ Andrew Jenson. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News Press, 1941). p. 88.
  4. ^ a b "Winslow Chamber of Commerce - Visiting Winslow". Winslowarizona.org. Retrieved 2010-07-27. 
  5. ^ "Historic Sites - Brigham City". Arizona Heritage Traveler. Retrieved 2010-07-27. 
  6. ^ Moffat, Riley (1996). Population History of Western U.S. Cities and Towns, 1850-1990. Lanham, Maryland: Scarecrow Press, Inc. p. 9. ISBN 0-8108-3033-7. 
  7. ^ Tanner, George S and J Morris Richards, Colonization on the Little Colorado: The Joseph City Region (Flagstaff, Arizona: 1977) xiii.
  8. ^ Tanner, George S and J Morris Richards, Colonization on the Little Colorado: The Joseph City Region (Flagstaff, Arizona: 1977) 21, 32, 34.
  9. ^ "National Register of Historic Places Research Page - National Register of Historic Places Official Website-Part of the National Park Service". Nps.gov. Retrieved 2010-07-27. 
  10. ^ Stone, Lyle M. and Gerald A. Doyle & Assoc. 1980 "A Research Report and Restoration Considerations for the Interpretive Development of Historic Resources at Brigham City, A. T. for the City of Winslow, Arizona." ARS, Tempe and Gerald A. Doyle & Associates, Phoenix.
  11. ^ Ferg, Alan 1992 "1991 AAS Excavations at Brigham City and Plans for 1992." The Petroglyph (Arizona Archaeological Society) 28(3):14-15 and 2005 "Brother Behrman’s Pottery." Archaeology Southwest 19(2):7.