Brighton, Alabama

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Brighton
City
Location of Brighton in Jefferson County, Alabama.
Location of Brighton in Jefferson County, Alabama.
Coordinates: 33°26′20″N 86°56′43″W / 33.43889°N 86.94528°W / 33.43889; -86.94528Coordinates: 33°26′20″N 86°56′43″W / 33.43889°N 86.94528°W / 33.43889; -86.94528
Country United States
State Alabama
County Jefferson
Area[1]
 • Total 1.42 sq mi (3.66 km2)
 • Land 1.42 sq mi (3.66 km2)
 • Water 0.00 sq mi (0.00 km2)
Elevation 509 ft (155 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 2,945
 • Estimate (2017)[3] 2,801
 • Density 1,979.51/sq mi (764.28/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 35020
Area code(s) 205
FIPS code 01-09400
GNIS feature ID 0114914

Brighton is a city near Birmingham, Alabama, United States and located just east of Hueytown. At the 2010 census the population was 2,945. It is part of the Birmingham-Hoover Metropolitan Statistical Area, which in 2010 had a population of about 1,128,047, approximately one-quarter of Alabama's population.

It is one of four cities in Jefferson County named after cities in Great Britain. Many of the city's early settlers were of English descent; they named the town after the English tourist and resort city of Brighton, which is located on the English Channel.

Geography[edit]

Brighton is located at 33°26′20″N 86°56′44″W / 33.438958°N 86.945442°W / 33.438958; -86.945442.[4]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.4 square miles (3.6 km2), all land.

History[edit]

Brighton was not settled by European Americans until the late 19th century. Brighton was officially founded in 1892, when developer G.B. Edwards subdivided a tract of land and sold lots. It was named after an English resort coastal town. It was situated along a dummy railroad line built in 1889 by the Bessemer & Birmingham Railroad Company to connect those two growing industrial cities.

The Old Huntsville Road was renamed as Main Street and the city was incorporated in 1901. By that year, at least 100 families were living in Brighton. The town had a population of 1,502 by the 1910 census, with seventeen commercial establishments, including eight grocery stores.

The city's fortunes have been closely linked to those of Woodward Iron Company. Together with coal mining in this area, the iron company was integral to the industrial development in this part of Alabama, which is based on the much larger cities of Birmingham, Bessemer, and Gadsden. After industrial restructuring in the late 1970s and when the iron company moved out, the town has declined in population since its peak in 1980.

Brighton Cemetery, which is still operating, contains the graves of persons of Scottish, English and German descent who came to work at Woodward.[5]

In August 1908, coal miner and union leader William Miller, who was black, was accused of blowing up the home of a white mine operator Finley Fuller. It was during a period of labor unrest as mine workers tried to organize unions. Miller was lynched by a white mob that dragged him out of the Brighton jail. They hanged and killed him not far from Brighton City Hall. Later, it was found that whites opposed to unionization had bombed Fuller's home; by linking the crime to a black man, they intended to increase general opposition to the union's drive for better wages.[6]

In 2015, after the Equal Justice Initiative (EJI) published its study Lynching in America: Confronting the Legacy of Racial Terror, the city of Brighton resolved to place a historical marker to commemorate Miller for his work with the union and as a victim of lynching. They worked in cooperation with EJI and placed the marker in a ceremony near City Hall. Brighton was the first city in Alabama to install such a memorial. In a related effort, scholarships will be awarded to high school students for writing essays about Alabama's racial history.[6][7]

City government[edit]

Brighton has a Mayor–council government. It operates both police and fire departments.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
19101,502
19203,665144.0%
19301,708−53.4%
19401,377−19.4%
19501,68922.7%
19602,88470.8%
19702,277−21.0%
19805,308133.1%
19904,518−14.9%
20003,640−19.4%
20102,945−19.1%
Est. 20172,801[3]−4.9%
U.S. Decennial Census[8]
2013 Estimate[9]

As of the census of 2000, there were 3,640 people, 1,413 households, and 921 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,599.1 people per square mile (1,003.9/km2). There were 1,636 housing units at an average density of 1,168.2 per square mile (451.2/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 9.01% White, 89.12% Black or African American, 0.38% Native American, 0.03% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.88% from other races, and 0.55% from two or more races. 1.73% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 1,413 households out of which 25.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 29.9% were married couples living together, 29.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.8% were non-families. 32.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.57 and the average family size was 3.29.

In the city, the population was spread out with 25.5% under the age of 18, 10.3% from 18 to 24, 26.0% from 25 to 44, 21.8% from 45 to 64, and 16.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 87.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 78.9 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $21,364, and the median income for a family was $27,926. Males had a median income of $24,018 versus $20,192 for females. The per capita income for the city was $11,002. About 20.2% of families and 27.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 38.3% of those under age 18 and 20.3% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census[edit]

As of the census of 2010, there were 2,945 people, 1,105 households, and 696 families residing in the city. The population density was 789.3 people per square mile (818.1/km2). There were 1,360 housing units at an average density of 971.4 per square mile (377.8/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 81.0% Black or African American, 6.5% White, 1.0% Native American, 0.0% Asian, 0.0% Pacific Islander, 10.8% from other races, and 0.9% from two or more races. 13.8% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 1,105 households out of which 21.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 24.6% were married couples living together, 31.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 37.0% were non-families. 32.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.64 and the average family size was 3.39.

In the city, the population was spread out with 22.8% under the age of 18, 11.5% from 18 to 24, 23.4% from 25 to 44, 27.2% from 45 to 64, and 15.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 94.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 102.1 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $25,929, and the median income for a family was $31,472. Males had a median income of $20,838 versus $28,250 for females. The per capita income for the city was $14,858. About 14.1% of families and 16.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 19.6% of those under age 18 and 21.9% of those age 65 or over.

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2017 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved Jul 7, 2018. 
  2. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2014-06-07. 
  3. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved March 24, 2018. 
  4. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  5. ^ Marjorie L. White, The Birmingham District, An Industrial History and Guide (1981), pp. 141-142
  6. ^ a b Jeremy Gray, "Marker honors Alabama coal miner lynched in 1908", AL.com, 14 December 2015; accessed 13 April 2018
  7. ^ [1]
  8. ^ United States Census Bureau. "Census of Population and Housing". Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved August 10, 2013. 
  9. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013". Retrieved June 7, 2014. 

Father of Bo jackson: AD Adams Sr