British Academy Children's Awards

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British Academy Children's Awards
British Academy Children's Awards logo.svg
Country United Kingdom
First awarded1996
Websitewww.bafta.org/childrens-awards/

The British Academy Children's Awards are presented in an annual award show hosted by the British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA). They have been awarded annually since 1996. Before that, children's awards were a part of the main British Academy Television Awards.

Current awards[edit]

Animation[edit]

Channel of the Year[edit]

Comedy[edit]

Drama[edit]

Performer[edit]

Entertainment[edit]

Factual[edit]

Pre-School[edit]

Animation[edit]

Live Action[edit]

Presenter[edit]

Writer[edit]

International[edit]

Short Form[edit]

Feature Film[edit]

Independent Production Company[edit]

Interactive[edit]

Original[edit]

  • 2014: Dixi
  • 2015: Virry
  • 2016: Secret Life of Boys

Adapted[edit]

Learning[edit]

Primary[edit]

  • 2006: Mapping Our World
  • 2007: Espresso Education: Espresso Primary
  • 2008: ArtisanCam
  • 2009: Off By Heart
  • 2010: L8R
  • 2011: Quiff and Boot
  • 2012: Seeking Refuge
  • 2013: Children Of World War 2
  • 2014: Lizard Girl
  • 2015: My Life, My Religion
  • 2016: I Can't Go to School Today
  • 2017: History Bombs: Online History Resources

Secondary[edit]

  • 2006: Timelines: Empire
  • 2007: Recollection Eyewitnesses: Remembering the Holocaust
  • 2008: L8R
  • 2009: Troubled Minds
  • 2010: Timelines.tv: Smallpox Through Time
  • 2011: Privates
  • 2012: L8R Youngers 2
  • 2013: Just a Few Drinks
  • 2014: Poetry: Between the Lines
  • 2015: Poetry: Between the Lines
  • 2016: Ten Pieces II

Video Game[edit]

Special Award[edit]

Retired awards[edit]

Pre-School[edit]

Discontinued in 2000, for separate categories for live-action and animation.

  • 1999: Tecwyn Y Tractor

Schools: Drama[edit]

  • 1999: Junk
  • 2000: Dream On
  • 2001: ID Citizenship: Beyond The Boundary
  • 2002: Scene - Offside
  • 2003: Lion Mountain
  • 2004: The Illustrated Mum
  • 2005: Scene - Oddsquad

Schools Factual[edit]

Primary[edit]

Discontinued in 2006 for Learning: Primary.

  • 1999: Rat-A-Tat-Tat: Beans On Toast and Ketchup On Your Cornflakes
  • 2000: English Express: Texts - Football
  • 2001: Zig Zag - Snapshots: Children In The Second World War
  • 2002: Geography Junction: Jamaica - The Coastal Environment
  • 2003: Let's Write a Story: Writing Academy
  • 2004: Thinking Skills: Think About It - Hiding Places
  • 2005: Primary History - Indus Civilisation: Mohenjo-Daro

Secondary[edit]

Discontinued in 2006 for Learning: Secondary.

  • 1999: Turning Points: Alcohol Misuse - Emma's Story
  • 2000: Lifeschool Sex - Saying it for the Girls
  • 2001: The Test Of Time - Forgiveness
  • 2002: History File: Britain 1906-1918 - A History In Photographs
  • 2003: The English Programme: Film Focus: Animation - Food Commercials
  • 2004: In Search of the Tartan Turban
  • 2005: School of Hard Knocks

Interactive[edit]

Discontinued in 2014 for separate Interactive categories: Original and Adapted.

BAFTA Kids' Vote[edit]

Discontinued in 2009, for separate voting categories for feature film, television, video game and website.

Website[edit]

Feature Film[edit]

Television[edit]

Video Game[edit]

Writer[edit]

Adapted[edit]

Discontinued in 2006 for one sole Writer category.

Original[edit]

Discontinued in 2006 for one sole Writer category.

Breakthrough Talent[edit]

CBBC Me and My Movie[edit]

  • 2008: The Prank
  • 2009: Vern's Vacation

BAFTA Young Game Designers[edit]

  • 2010: HAMSTER: Accidental World Domination
  • 2011: Rollin' Scotch

Game Concept[edit]

  • 2012: Vacuum Panic AKA Suck It Up

Game Making[edit]

  • 2012: Smiley Dodgems

Multiplatform[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Children's | Drama in 2002". British Academy of Film and Television Arts. Retrieved 16 January 2016.
  2. ^ "Children's in 2010 | BAFTA Awards". Awards.bafta.org. Retrieved 2016-01-30.

External links[edit]