British Rail Class 302

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British Rail Class 302
LTS unit (class 302) 298 1964 Barking.jpg
Class 302 at Barking in 1964
In service1958–1998[1]
ManufacturerBritish Rail
Order no.
  • 30429 DTS, 75033-75044 - 1958-59
    30434 MBSO, 61060-61096 - 1958-59
    30435 DTS, 75060-75084 - 1959
    30436 DTSOL, 75085-75100 - 1958-59, 75190-75210 - 1959
    30437 TSsoL, 70060-70095 - 1958-59
    30438 MBSO, 61097-61132 - 1959, 61190-61228 1959-60
    30439 DTS, 75211-75285 - 1959-60
    30440 DTSOL, 75286-75360 - 1959-60
    30441 TSsoL, 70096-70132 - 1959, 70190-70228 - 1959-61[1]
Built at
Family nameBR First Generation EMU
Constructed1958–1959[1]
Refurbished
  • Facelifted 1982–1984 (49)
  • Refurbished 1983–1984 (30)
  • Parcels conversion 1989–1990 (4)[3]
Formation
  • 4 cars per unit
  • As built: DTSOL+MBS+TCsoL+DTS
  • Refurbished (82): DTCOL+MBSO+TSOL+DTSO
[1]
DiagramAs built
  • 432 DTSOL
  • 405 MBS
  • 455 TCsoL
  • 433 DTS

TOPS Codes
As built
  • EF201.0A DTSOL
  • ED205.0A MBS
  • EH302.0A TCsoL
  • EE205.0A DTS
[4]
Refreshed 1982-84
  • EF201.0B DTCOL
  • ED216.2C MBSO
  • EH223.0B TSO
  • EE223.0A DTSO
[4]
Refurbished 1983-4
  • EF303.0C DTCOL
  • ED217.0A MBSO
  • EH2230D TSO
  • EE219.0C DTSO
[4]
Ex Class 504
  • EF215.0A DTSo
[5][6]
Parcels
  • EF501 DTPMV
  • ED501 MPMV
  • EE501 DTPMV
[7]
Design codeAM2[2]
Fleet numbers
  • 302201-302312 (sets)
  • 61060 - 61132 / 61190-61228 (MBS Later MBSO)
  • 70060 - 70132 / 70190 - 70228 (TCsoL later TSOL)
  • 75033 - 044 / 75060 - 75084 (DTS later DTSO)
  • 75085 - 75100 / 75190 - 75210 (DTSOL later DTCOL)
  • 75211 - 285 (DTS later DTSO)
  • 75286 - 75320 (DTSOL later DTCOL)
[1][8]
Capacity
  • 80S 2T (DTSOL)
  • 24F 52S 1T (DTCOL) Refurbished
  • 96S (MBS)
  • 82S (MBSO) Refurbished
  • 19F 60S 2T(TCsoL)
  • 86S 2T (TSOL) Refurbished
  • 108S (DTS)
  • 88S (DTSO) Refurbished
[8]
Operator(s)
Depot(s)
Line(s) served
Specifications
Train length266 ft 7 in (81.25 m)
Car length
  • 66 ft 6 in (20.27 m) MBS, TCsoL
  • 66 ft 9+12 in (20.358 m) BDTS, DTS [11]
Width9 ft 3 in (2.82 m)
Height12 ft 7 in (3.84 m)
Floor height3 ft 9 in (1.14 m)
Maximum speed75 mph (121 km/h)[12]
Weight
  • 155 long tons (157 t; 174 short tons) (total)
  • 39.5 t (38.9 long tons; 43.5 short tons) (DTSOL)
  • 55.3 t (54.4 long tons; 61.0 short tons) (MBS)
  • 34.4 t (33.9 long tons; 37.9 short tons) (TCsoL)
  • 33.4 t (32.9 long tons; 36.8 short tons) (DTS)
Traction motors4 × English Electric EE536A[8]
Power output4 × 192 hp (143 kW)[8]
Electric system(s)Originally = 6.25 / 25kV ac Overhead[13]
Current collector(s)Pantograph
UIC classification2'2'+Bo'Bo'+2'2'+2'2'
Braking system(s)Air (EP/Auto)[2]
Safety system(s)AWS[11]
Coupling system
[11]
Multiple workingWithin class, and other pre-1972 25kV EMUs
Track gauge1,435 mm (4 ft 8+12 in) standard gauge

The British Rail Class 302 (pre-TOPS AM2) was a type of electric multiple unit (EMU) introduced between 1958 and 1960 for outer suburban passenger services on the London, Tilbury and Southend line. This class of multiple unit was constructed using the Mark 1 bodyshell and was slam-door.

Overview[edit]

Like all the Eastern Region AC EMUs of the period, they were equipped to operate on both 25 kV AC and the reduced 6.25 kV voltage in the inner London areas where headroom for the overhead wires was reduced. On the LT&S the changeover point was just east of Barking station on both Upminster and Tilbury routes with the link to Forest Gate being at 6.25kV ac.[14]

Each unit was formed of four coaches, in the following formation: DTSOL (Driving Trailer Second Open with Lavatory) – MBS (Motor Brake Second) – TCsoL (Trailer Composite semi-open with Lavatory) – DTS (Driving Trailer Second). The initial set numbers were 201–312, later prefixed by the class number 302 with the introduction of TOPS.[15]

The Battery Driving Trailer and Driving Trailer were fitted with drop head buckeye couplers with screw coupler in the Guards Van, retractable buffers are also fitted only on outer ends of the Battery Driving Trailer/Driving Trailer.

Service history[edit]

Public service started on 16 March 1959 with Class 302s working the first electric passenger trains between Colchester and Clacton at 25kV ac. A revised half hourly timetable started on April 13 from Colchester with a 8 car train splitting at Thorpe-le-Soken with half going to Walton-on-Naze[16][17]

Some Class 302s were used for crew training in Manchester before the Class 304 units were introduced in April 1960.[18]

They were among the first electric units delivered to the Eastern Region and, although ordered for the LT&S electrification, a route they were long associated with, they were used initially on the Liverpool Street to Hertford East, Bishop's Stortford and Enfield Town lines when they were electrified in November 1960. The 302s also stepped in when electrification was extended from Chelmsford to Colchester in 1961 and when the Class 305 units were having problems on the then new north-east London electric services. Some formations were temporarily reduced to three cars for the Enfield Town services.[16]

The first 25 units remained on the GE main line for the bulk of their lives, with the remainder operating on the LT&S from Fenchurch Street from 1962.[19]

Between November 1961 and June 1962, the class suffered traction motor insulation trouble which meant the motors had to be re-wound.[16]

302312 was used as a test bed for silicon rectifier technology and a Brentford transformer[20] from 1962 to 1964, then used to test thyristor control equipment until 1972, becoming the first electric train so fitted in the UK.[20]

Class 302 with Class 504 DTSO

Unit 302 244 was involved in an accident in 1972 with a lorry at a level crossing at Low Street railway station in Tilbury, after which it was decided to scrap the leading carriage, BDTC 75292. This was replaced with DTSO 77164, originally belonging to a Manchester-Bury Line Class 504. It remained like this until May 1983 when it acquired a spare BDTC, 75298, from withdrawn unit 302250.[20][19][21]

In 1987-88, 6 units were short formed with the removal of the trailer composite (TCsoL) and based at Ilford EMD for work on the GE lines.[22]

Old Number BDTCO MBSO DTSO
302434 302234 75207 61093 75081
302439 302239 75287 61098 75212
302459 302259 75307 61118 75232
302462 302262 75310 61121 75235
302494 302294 75342 61210 75267
302497 302297 75345 61213 75282

[23]

Following the privatisation of British Rail, ownership of the last 30 units passed to Eversholt Rail Group with all units being leased by LTS Rail.[24]

The run-down of class 302s started in 1984 with the majority being phased out when Class 310 where introduced on to the LT&S in 1988 with last 30 units being withdrawn by 1998 with the introduction of Class 317 in 1997 and with extra Class 312 in 1998.[25][26][27]

Electrical equipment[edit]

Electrical equipment was supplied by English Electric with the majority of equipment being interchangeable with Class 308 units.

Electrically there were three main systems, Control which operated at 110 volts DC, provided by nickel iron alkaline secondary cells, auxiliary 250 volts AC from the tertiary winding of the main transformer which provided power to the battery charger which was also rectified to power the main compressor, and finally power circuits derived from secondary winding of the main transformer at 1,500 volts AC.

The primary winding of the transformer was designed to operate on either 6.25 kV or 25 kV with voltage sensing equipment fitted to ensure the correct arrangement of primary windings for a given voltage. An incorrect voltage selection device was fitted to both the Class 302 and Class 308 stock so that if the primary winding was connected for 6.25 kV when supplied with 25 kV the air blast circuit breaker manufactured by Brown Boveri would remain closed but the pantograph would be lowered. Should this happen the transformer would require changing and overhaul as well as possibly other equipment due to flashover damage.

The transformer was also protected by a Buchholz relay which monitored any gas build-up within the cooling/insulating oil, as the acetylene (ethyne) gas generated is highly explosive. All Class 302 and 308 stock were fitted with Stone Faiveley pantographs for current collection from the overhead line. A particular oddity of Eastern/Anglian region EMU stock was the fitting of fibre glass snow shields between the pantograph and the supporting insulators.

One member of the class, 302 302, was experimentally fitted with thyristor control in the early 1970s. After the experiment it was converted back to the original tap changer control, although the guard's van remained slightly different internally.

Refurbished Units[edit]

Class 302 at Barking on a Pitsea service in 1993

On refurbishment the trailer coaches were fitted with B5 bogies for both driving ends, along with conversions of the Battery Driving Second Open (BDTSOL) to a Battery Driving Trailer Composite Open (BDTCOL) having moved the first class accommodation to a position over the Westinghouse CM38 main compressor which was noisy and caused vibration, Driving Standard Compartment to a Driving Standard Open DTSO having removed the compartments for an open layout. The centre trailer had B4 bogies fitted with the Trailer Composite Semi Open (TCSOL) design converted to Trailer Standard Open (TSOL). The motor coach retained its Gresley derived bogies after refurbishment with compartments removed for an open layout with guards van. All 30 units would also receive gangway connections between cars within the unit.[3]

Originally the vehicles were insulated with blue asbestos which was removed and sealed during refurbishment between 1982 - 84 with some of the compartments being removed and reconfigured to open saloons.[3]

Units that received the original facelift with just Motor Brake Second (MBS) and the Driving Trailer Second (DTS) having their compartments removed for an open layout with the (TCSOL) not receiving any layout changes and keeping the Gresley bogies were:

202, 204, 205, 213, 215, 216, 217, 218, 220, 225, 226, 227, 228, 231, 232, 234, 236, 239, 245, 251, 252, 254, 259, 261, 262, 263, 274, 277, 279, 280, 283, 284, 285, 292, 293, 297, 298, 299, 300, 301, 303, 304, 307, 308, 311[28][29][30]

The 30 units that received the full refurbishment and would last until withdrawal of 302s from service on LT&S were:[31]

Old Number BDTCO MBSO TSO DTSO Old Number BDTCO MBSO TSO DTSO
302201 75085 61060 70060 75033 302216 75100 61075 70075 75063
302202 75086 61061 70061 75034 302217 75190 61076 70076 75064
302203 302263 75311 61122 70122 75236 302218 75191 61077 70077 75065
302204 75088 61063 70063 75036 302219 75192 61078 70078 75066
302205 75089 61064 70064 75037 302220 75193 61079 70079 75067
302206 75090 61065 70065 75038 302221 75194 61080 70080 75068
302207 302310 75358 61226 70226 75283 302222 75195 61081 70081 75069
302208 302308 75356 61224 70224 75281 302223 302293 75341 61209 70209 75266
302209 75093 61068 70068 75041 302224 75197 61083 70083 75071
302210 75094 61069 70069 75042 302225 75198 61084 70084 75072
302211 75095 61070 70070 75043 302226 75199 61085 70085 75073
302212 75096 61071 70071 75044 302227 302277 75325 61193 70193 75250
302213 75097 61072 70072 75060 302228 75201 61087 61087 75075
302214 302304 75352 61220 70220 75277 302229 75202 61088 70088 75076
302215 75099 61074 70074 75062 302230 302232 75205 61091 70091 75079

Class 302/9 - non-passenger conversions[edit]

Class 302 in Royal Mail red at Ilford in 1989

The sub-classification 302/9 was used for seven non-passenger carrying conversions. Units 302990-993 were reduced to three-car length and converted for use as Royal Mail parcels units, with the addition of bodyside roller shutter doors, and repainted in Royal Mail red livery. Units 302996-998 were also reduced to three-car length and used as departmental sandite rail treatment units, later being reclassified as Class 937.

Parcels Units[edit]

BDTPMV Old Number MPMV Old Number DTPMV Old Number
302990 68100 (75084) 68020 (61090) 68207 (75082)
302991 68101 (75221) 68021 (61067) 68208 (75217)
302992 68102 (75220) 68022 (61227) 68209 (75218)
302993 68105 (75078) 68023 (61222) 68213 (75074)

[32]

Departmental Sandite Units[edit]

DT Old Number MB Old Number DT Old Number
(937)996 ADB977598 (75080) ADB977599 (61073) ADB977600 (75061)
(937)997 ADB977601 (75211) ADB977602 (61228) ADB977603 (75035)
(937)998 ADB977604 (75077) ADB977605 (61062) ADB977606 (75070)

[33]

Liveries[edit]

When introduced, the units were outshopped in plain BR EMU suburban green livery with the early lion and wheel crest on the MBS. In 1962 a small yellow end became mandatory for all units. In the mid 1960's BR Rail Blue, also known as Monastral blue, was applied to 112 members of the fleet and from 1968 a full yellow end now became mandatory to increase visibility for permanent way staff on the track. From 1982, when refreshed units were released from the works, they were painted in the then standard BR blue and grey livery. 302217 was the first member of the class to receive Network SouthEast Livery by 1987, being the sole example until 1990–1993 when NSE livery was applied to the 30 remaining class members. Un-refurbished unit 302207, later renumbered to 302200, received the original green livery with a small yellow panel in 1987.[34]

Preservation[edit]

Preserved 302201 in 2019

Two driving trailers, 75033 and 75250, which belonged to units 302 201 and 302 227, are preserved at Mangapps Railway Museum near Burnham-on-Crouch, Essex. These units have been repainted into BR overall blue with yellow ends and are still in very good condition, with the destination scrolls still in working order, the seats still in British Rail colours and the Network South East maps still in very good condition. The rest of the fleet has been scrapped since withdrawal in late 1999.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Longworth, Hugh (2015). British Railways Electric Multiple Units to 1975. Addlestone: OPC. pp. 125–127, 154–155, 173–176. ISBN 9780860936688.
  2. ^ a b c Marsden, Colin (1982). Motive power recognition:2. Shepperton: Ian Allan. p. 8. ISBN 0711011656.
  3. ^ a b c d Swain, Alec (1990). British Rail Fleet Survey 11. Shepperton: Ian Allan. pp. 31–32. ISBN 9780711019027.
  4. ^ a b c Wood, Roger (1989). British Rail Motive Power Combined Volume 1989. Shepperton: Ian Allan. pp. 75–76. ISBN 0-7110-1849-9.
  5. ^ Mallaband, Peter; Bowles, L.J. (1978). Coaching Stock of British Railways 1978. Rugeley: RCTS. p. 77. ISBN 0-901115-44-4.
  6. ^ Bowles, L.J.; Mallaband, Peter (October 1983). British Rail Coaching Stock 1983/4 (8th ed.). Shepperton: Ian Allan. p. 101. ISBN 0-7110-1352-7.
  7. ^ Fox, Peter (1992). British Railways Locomotives & Coaching Stock 1992. Sheffield: Platform 5 Publishing. p. 218. ISBN 1-872524-37-0.
  8. ^ a b c d Wood 1989, p. 76
  9. ^ Fox, Peter (1998). British Railways Locomotives & Coaching Stock 1998. Sheffield: Platform 5 Publishing. pp. 240, 355. ISBN 1-902336-00-3.
  10. ^ Fox, Peter (1985). Locomotives & Coaching Stock 1985. Sheffield: Platform 5. pp. 158–159, 236. ISBN 9780906579459.
  11. ^ a b c "Vehicle Diagram Book No.210 for Electrical Multiple Units (including A.P.T.)" (PDF). BRB Residuary Ltd. ED205, EE205, EF201, EH302. Archived from the original (PDF) on 3 March 2016. Retrieved 10 May 2021 – via Barrowmore MRG.
  12. ^ Wood 1989, p. 75
  13. ^ Mallaband, Peter; Bowles, L.J. (1974). The Coaching Stock of British Railways 1974. Kenilworth: RCTS. p. 111. ISBN 0-901115-27-4. LCCN 75330480. OCLC 1974473.
  14. ^ Cowley, Ian (1987). Anglia East: The Transformation of a Railway. Newton Abbot: David & Charles. p. 26. ISBN 978-0-7153-8978-2.
  15. ^ Longworth 2015, pp. 23–24
  16. ^ a b c Cowley 1987, p. 75
  17. ^ Glover, John (2003). Eastern Electric. Shepperton: Ian Allan. p. 68. ISBN 978-0-7110-2934-7.
  18. ^ Glover 2003, p. 69
  19. ^ a b Mallaband & Bowles 1974, pp. 113–114
  20. ^ a b c Cowley 1987, p. 77
  21. ^ Longworth 2015, p. 68
  22. ^ Longworth 2015, p. 23
  23. ^ Fox, Peter (1988). British Railways Locomotives & Coaching Stock 1988. Sheffield: Platform 5. p. 192. ISBN 9780906579787.
  24. ^ Fox, Peter (1995). British Railways Locomotives & Coaching Stock 1995. Sheffield: Platform 5. pp. 186, 187. ISBN 1-872524-72-9.
  25. ^ Wood 1989, pp. 87–88
  26. ^ Fox 1998, pp. 247, 252
  27. ^ Fox, Peter (1999). British Railways Locomotives & Coaching Stock 1999. Sheffield: Platform 5. p. 249. ISBN 9781902336077.
  28. ^ Bowles & Mallaband 1983, pp. 100–101
  29. ^ Bowles, L.J.; Gunner, Keith (1985). British Rail Coaching Stock 1985 (9th ed.). Shepperton: Ian Allan. pp. 117–118. ISBN 0-7110-1455-8.
  30. ^ Fox, Peter (1987). Locomotives & Coaching Stock 1987. Sheffield: Platform 5. pp. 157–158. ISBN 9780906579671.
  31. ^ Wood 1989, pp. 76–77
  32. ^ Fox, Peter (1993). British Railways Locomotives & Coaching Stock 1993. Sheffield: Platform 5 Publishing. p. 218. ISBN 1-872524-49-4.
  33. ^ Fox 1992, p. 305
  34. ^ Swain 1990, pp. 31–33

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]