Britt Woodman

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Britt Woodman
Born(1920-06-04)June 4, 1920
Los Angeles, California
DiedOctober 13, 2000(2000-10-13) (aged 80)
Hawthorne, California
GenresJazz
Occupation(s)Musician
InstrumentsTrombone
Years active1940s–1990s
Associated actsDuke Ellington, Charles Mingus

Britt Woodman (June 4, 1920 – October 13, 2000) was an American jazz trombonist.[1]

Career[edit]

Woodman was a childhood friend of Charles Mingus, but first worked with Phil Moore and Les Hite.[1] After service in World War II he played with Boyd Raeburn before joining with Lionel Hampton in 1946. During the 1950s he worked with Ellington.[1] As a member of Ellington's band he can be heard on Such Sweet Thunder (1957), Ella Fitzgerald Sings the Duke Ellington Song Book (also 1957), Black, Brown, and Beige (1958) and Ellington Indigos (1958).

In 1960 he left Ellington to work in a pit orchestra.[1] Later he worked with Mingus and can be heard on the album Mingus Mingus Mingus Mingus Mingus (1963). In the 1970s, he led his own octet and worked with pianist Toshiko Akiyoshi.[1] In 1989, he was in the personnel for the album Epitaph dedicated to the previously unrecorded music of Charles Mingus.

He died in Hawthorne, California at the age of 80, having suffered severe respiratory problems.[2]

Discography[edit]

As sideman[edit]

With Toshiko Akiyoshi – Lew Tabackin Big Band

  • Long Yellow Road (RCA, 1975)
  • Tales of a Courtesan (RCA Victor, 1976)
  • Insights (RCA, 1976)

With Bill Berry

  • Hot & Happy (Beez, 1974)
  • Hello Rev (Concord Jazz, 1976)
  • For Duke (M&K RealTime 1978)

With Duke Ellington

  • Ellington Uptown (Columbia, 1951)
  • Seattle Concert (RCA Victor, 1954)
  • Ellington '55 (Capitol, 1954)
  • Dance to the Duke! (Capitol, 1954)
  • Ellington Showcase (Capitol, 1955)
  • Historically Speaking (Bethlehem, 1956)
  • Duke Ellington Presents... (Bethlehem, 1956)
  • Such Sweet Thunder (Columbia, 1957)
  • A Drum Is a Woman (Columbia, 1957)
  • Ellington at Newport (Columbia, 1957)
  • Indigos (Columbia, 1958)
  • Newport 1958 (Columbia, 1958)
  • The Cosmic Scene (Columbia, 1958)
  • Black, Brown, and Beige (Columbia, 1958)
  • Ellington Moods (Sesac, 1959)
  • Ellington Jazz Party (Columbia, 1959)
  • The Nutcracker Suite (Columbia, 1960)
  • Solitude (Philips, 1960)
  • Piano in the Background (Philips, 1960)
  • Selections from Peer Gynt Suites (Columbia, 1960)
  • Concert at Carnegie Hall (DJM, 1976)
  • The Elegant Mister Ellington (Swing House, 1978)
  • Jungle Triangle (Black Lion, 1983)
  • All Star Road Band (Doctor Jazz, 1983)
  • Hot Summer Dance (Red Baron, 1991)

With Ella Fitzgerald

  • Ella Fitzgerald Sings the Duke Ellington Songbook (Verve, 1958)
  • Rhythm Is My Business (Verve, 1962)
  • Ella Fitzgerald Sings the Duke Ellington Songbook Vol. One (Verve, 1975)
  • Things Ain't What They Used to Be (And You Better Believe It) (Reprise, 1971)

With Lionel Hampton

  • In Concert (Durium, 1975)
  • Hamp's Big Band Live! (Glad-Hamp 1979)
  • Leapin' with Lionel (Affinity, 1983)
  • Newport Uproar! (RCA Victor, 1968)

With Johnny Hodges

With Charles Mingus

With Jimmy Smith

  • Bashin': The Unpredictable Jimmy Smith (Verve, 1962)
  • Plays Walk On the Wild Side and the Preacher (Verve, 1963)
  • Peter and the Wolf (Verve, 1966)
  • Hoochie Coochie Man (Verve, 1966)

With others

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Colin Larkin, ed. (2002). The Virgin Encyclopedia of Fifties Music (Third ed.). Virgin Books. p. 507. ISBN 1-85227-937-0.
  2. ^ https://www.latimes.com/archives/la-xpm-2000-oct-15-me-36894-story.html

External links[edit]