Brockville Rifles

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The Brockville Rifles
The Brockville Rifles badge.png
Cap badge
Active1866-present
CountryCanada
BranchPrimary Reserve
TypeRifles
RoleLight infantry
SizeOne battalion
Part ofRoyal Canadian Infantry Corps
Garrison/HQBrockville
Motto(s)Semper paratus
March"Bonnie Dundee"
AnniversariesRegimental birthday - 5 October 1866
EngagementsFenian Raids
First World War
Second World War
War in Afghanistan
Battle honoursSee #Battle honours
Websitecanada.ca/en/army/corporate/4-canadian-division/the-brockville-rifles.html Edit this at Wikidata

The Brockville Rifles is a Primary Reserve infantry regiment of the Canadian Army. The unit is a part of the 33 Canadian Brigade Group, 4th Canadian Division.[1] It is fifteenth in the order of precedence of Canadian Army Infantry Regiments.[2][3]

Badge[edit]

Description[edit]

A hunting horn is hung from a silver cord in the center of a gules (red) background, all of which is in a silver-bordered black ring with "The Brockville Rifles" inscribed in silver, all centered on a silver-and-black Maltese cross whose upper branch reads "Amiens" and the lower branch reads "Pursuit to Mons," both in silver. Over the cross is a crown.[4]

Symbolism[edit]

The Maltese cross and the bugle are typical among badges of light infantry and rifle regiments. "The Brockville Rifles" is the regimental title, and "Amiens" and "Pursuit to Mons" are battle honors from the First World War. The crown represents service to the Crown.[5]

Lineage[edit]

The Brockville Rifles[edit]

  • Originated on 5 October, 1866, in Brockville, Ontario as the 41st Brockville Battalion of Rifles
  • Redesignated on 8 May, 1900, as the 41st Regiment "Brockville Rifles
  • Redesignated on 12 March, 1920, as The Brockville Rifles
  • Redesignated on 18 March, 1942, as the 2nd (Reserve) Battalion, The Brockville Rifles
  • Converted on 1 April, 1946, to Artillery and Redesignated as the 60th Light Anti-Aircraft Regiment (Brockville Rifles), RCA
  • Amalgamated on 1 September, 1954, with the 32nd Anti-Tank Battery (Self-Propelled), RCA, and Redesignated as the 32nd Locating Battery (Brockville Rifles), RCA
  • Converted on 1 December, 1959, to Infantry and Redesignated as The Brockville Rifles[2]

32nd Anti-Tank Battery (Self-Propelled), RCA[edit]

  • Originated on 14 November, 1855, in Kingston, Ontario, as the Volunteer Militia Company of Foot Artillery of Kingston
  • Redesignated on 29 May, 1856, as the Volunteer Militia Field Battery of Artillery of Kingston
  • Redesignated on 1 July, 1894, as the No. 5 "Kingston" Field Battery
  • Redesignated on 28 December, 1895, as the 5th "Kingston" Field Battery, CA
  • Redesignated on 2 February, 1920, as the 32nd (Kingston) Battery, CFA
  • Redesignated on 1 July, 1925, as the 32nd (Kingston) Field Battery, CA
  • Redesignated on 3 June, 1935, as the 32nd (Kingston) Field Battery, RCA
  • Redesignated on 7 November, 1940, as the 32nd (Reserve) (Kingston) Field Battery, RCA
  • Redesignated on 24 June, 1942, as the 3rd/32nd (Reserve) Field Battery, RCA
  • Redesignated on 15 May, 1943, as the 32nd (Reserve) Anti-Aircraft Battery (Type 2H), RCA
  • Redesignated on 1 September, 1943, as the 3rd/32nd (Reserve) Field Battery, RCA
  • Redesignated on 1 April, 1946, as the 32nd Anti-Tank Battery (Self-Propelled), RCA
  • Amalgamated on 1 September 1954, with the 60th Light Anti-Aircraft Regiment (Brockville Rifles), RCA[2]

Lineage chart[edit]

Lineage chart[6]
1812Bn of Incorporated Militia of Upper Canada1st and 2nd Regts of Leeds Militia
1815DisbandedDisbanded
1855Independent rifle coysVolunteer Militia Coy of Foot Arty of Kingston
1856Volunteer Militia Field Bty of Arty of Kingston
186641st "Brockville Bn of Rifles"
1894No. 5 "Kingston" Field Bty
18955th "Kingston" Field Bty, CA
190041st Regt "Brockville Rifles"
1915156th "Overseas" Bn, CEF32nd "Overseas" Bty, CFA, CEF
1918Absorbed by 6th Reserve Bn, CEF
19201st Bn (156th Bn, CEF), The Brockville Rifles2nd Bn,[a] The Brockville RiflesDisbanded32nd (Kingston) Bty, CFA
192532nd (Kingston) Field Bty, CA
1935
1936The Brockville RiflesDisbanded
194032nd (Reserve) (Kingston) Field Bty, RCA
194032nd/34th Field Bty, RCA, CASF3rd/32nd (Reserve) Field Bty, RCA
194132nd (Kingston) Light Anti-Aircraft Bty, RCA, CASF34th Field Bty, RCA, CASF
19421st Bn, The Brockville Rifles, CASF2nd (Reserve) Bn, The Brockville Rifles
194332nd (Reserve) Anti-Aircraft Bty (Type 2H), RCA
19433rd/32nd (Reserve) Field Bty, RCA
1945Disbanded2nd 32nd Light Anti-Aircraft Bty, RCA, CAOF
1946Disbanded60th Light Anti-Aircraft Regt (Brockville Rifles), RCADisbanded32nd Anti-Tank Bty (Self-Propelled), RCA
195432nd Locating Bty (Brockville Rifles), RCA
1959The Brockville Rifles
2012

Perpetuations[edit]

The Brockville Rifles perpetuate the Battalion of Incorporated Militia of Upper Canada; the 1st and 2nd regiments of Leeds Militia (1812–15); the 156th Battalion, CEF; and 32nd Battery, Canadian Field Artillery, CEF.

The Brockville Rifles perpetuate units dating back to 1796 with the formation of the 1st Battalion, Leeds Militia at Elizabethtown (later Brockville). At its peak, Leeds County had raised a total of nine battalions. During the War of 1812, regiments that the Brockville Rifles perpetuate were involved in the capture of Ogdensburg and the Battle of Crysler's Farm.[7]

Operational history[edit]

Fenian Raids[edit]

The 41st Brockville Battalion of Rifles was called out on active service from 24 May 1870 to 1 June 1870 and served on the St. Lawrence River frontier.[2]

Great War[edit]

The 156th Battalion (Leeds and Grenville), CEF, was authorized on 22 December 1915 and embarked for Britain on 19 October 1916, where, on 1 November 1916, the battalion's personnel were absorbed by the 109th Battalion (Victoria & Haliburton), CEF; 119th Battalion (Algoma), CEF; 120th Battalion (City of Hamilton), CEF; 123rd Battalion (Royal Grenadiers), CEF; and 124th Battalion (Governor General's Body Guard), CEF. On 27 December 1916, the battalion was reformed to provide reinforcements to the Canadian Corps in the field until being absorbed by the 6th Reserve Battalion, CEF, on 15 February 1918. The battalion was disbanded on 29 November 1918.[2]

The 32nd Battery, CFA, CEF, was authorized on 15 August 1915 and embarked for Britain on 5 February 1916, disembarking in France on 14 July 1916, where it fought as part of the 9th Brigade, CFA, CEF, from 15 July 1916 to 1 July 1917, and subsequently with the 8th Army Brigade, CFA, in France and Flanders, from 5 July 1917 until the end of the war. The battery was disbanded on 23 October 1920.[2]

Second World War[edit]

The regiment mobilized the 1st Battalion, The Brockville Rifles, CASF, on 18 March 1942. It served in Canada in a home defence role as part of the 13th Infantry Brigade, 6th Canadian Division, and in Jamaica on garrison duty from 5 August 1944 to 27 March 1946. The battalion was disbanded on 30 April 1946.[2]

The regiment provided No. 2 Company of The Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry Highlanders, CASF, for active service on 24 May 1940.[2]

The 32nd (Kingston) Field Battery, RCA, in conjunction with the 34th Field Battery, RCA, mobilized the 32nd/34th Field Battery, RCA, CASF, on 24 May 1940. This unit was reorganized as two separate batteries on 1 January 1941, designated the 32nd (Kingston) Field Battery, RCA, CASF, and the 34th Field Battery, RCA, CASF, (which was redesignated the 32nd (Kingston) Light Anti-Aircraft Battery, RCA, CASF, on the same day). It provided light anti-aircraft artillery support as part of the 4th Light Anti-Aircraft Regiment, RCA, CASF, in North-West Europe until the end of the war. The overseas battery was disbanded on 13 November 1945. The battery subsequently mobilized the 2nd/32nd Light Anti-Aircraft Battery, RCA, Canadian Army Occupation Force, on 1 June 1945, for active service with the Canadian Army Occupation Force in Germany. The battery was disbanded on 4 April 1946.[2][8]

War in Afghanistan[edit]

The regiment contributed an aggregate of more than 20% of its authorized strength to the various task forces which served in Afghanistan between 2002 and 2014.[9]

History[edit]

Early History[edit]

The Brockville Rifles originated in Brockville, Ontario on 5 October 1866, when the 41st Brockville Battalion of Rifles was authorized with six companies located as follows: 1 Company was in Brockville, 2 Company was in Gananoque, 3 Company was in Perth, 4 Company was in Merrickville, 5 Company was in Carleton Place, and 6 Company was in Pakenham. It was designated the 41st Regiment "Brockville Rifles" on 8 May 1900; The Brockville Rifles on 12 March 1920; and the 2nd (Reserve) Battalion, The Brockville Rifles on 18 March 1942.

First World War[edit]

On 22 December 1915, during World War I, the 156th Leeds & Grenville Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force, was authorized. The unit moved to England as part of the proposed 5th Canadian Division. However, a pressing need for troops and reinforcements on the front caused the disbanding of the unit; and its men were transferred to other units.[10]

1920s–1930s[edit]

Following World War I, the regiment was once again designated The Brockville Rifles. In April 1926, the Colonel Commandant of the King's Royal Rifle Corps invited the unit to ally with them. Today, following a series of amalgamations within the British Army, The Brockville Rifles are allied with The Rifles.

Second World War[edit]

On 24 May 1940, during World War II, the regiment provided No. 2 Company of The Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry Highlanders, Canadian Active Service Force. On 18 March 1942, the regiment mobilized the 1st Battalion, The Brockville Rifles, into the Canadian Active Service Force. It served in Canada, in a home defence role, as part of the 13th Infantry Brigade, 6th Canadian Division, and, from 5 August 1944 to 27 March 1946, in Jamaica on garrison duty. On 30 April 1946, the battalion was disbanded. The 2nd (Reserve) Battalion served on a part-time basis in the Reserve Army at home, in Brockville.

Post War[edit]

On 1 April 1946, The regiment (the "Brocks") was converted to artillery and redesignated the 60th Light Anti-Aircraft Regiment (Brockville Rifles), RCA. On 1 September 1954, it was amalgamated with the 32nd Anti-Tank Battery (Self-Propelled), RCA, and redesignated as the 32nd Locating Battery (Brockville Rifles), RCA. On 1 December 1959, it once again reverted to infantry and was redesignated The Brockville Rifles.[11]

Since the end of the Second World War, Members of The Brockville Rifles have served on operations in Afghanistan, Bosnia, The Former Republic of Georgia, among other deployments. The unit prepares soldiers to be employable as effective individual augmentees to Canadian Forces operations and deployments.

Alliances[edit]

Battle honours[edit]

In the list below, battle honours in capitals were awarded for participation in large operations and campaigns. Those in lowercase indicate those granted for more specific battles.

War of 1812[edit]

  • DEFENCE OF CANADA - 1812-1815 - DÉFENSE DU CANADA
  • NIAGARA

First World War[edit]

Second World War[edit]

War in Afghanistan[edit]

Recruiting[edit]

The unit recruits infantry soldiers and officers from Brockville and surrounding communities, traditionally west to Kingston and north to Kemptville and Ottawa. Basic training for the Primary Reserve is typically conducted every second weekend over a period of 6 months, during the fall and winter. Infantry soldiers must complete an 8-week qualification course at CFB Meaford. Infantry officers must complete basic training as well as two additional qualification courses at the Infantry School in CFB Gagetown, which require a further 10- and 12-week commitment.

Training[edit]

The Brocks train regularly at Canadian Armed Forces ranges and training areas, such as CFB Petawawa and CFB Kingston, as well as within Brockville, Prescott, and other local communities. Members of the unit are expected to train a minimum of one night a week and participate in one weekend exercise a month. Training consists of basic infantry soldier skills, individual battle-task standards, and more advanced training, such as urban operations and live-fire field exercises. The unit often trains with its sister unit—The Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry Highlanders—as well as participating in brigade-level training exercises with 33 Canadian Brigade Group as part of the 33 Territorial Battalion Group formation, encompassing units from across 33 CBG.

Armoury[edit]

Site Date(s) Designated Description Image
Brockville Armoury
1-9 East Avenue facing King Street
1900-1 1990 Recognized - Register of the Government of Canada Heritage Buildings Housing The Brockville Rifles, this centrally located, large, low-massed, stone structure in the Romanesque style features a low-pitched gable roof.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Reserve order of battle

References[edit]

  1. ^ 1000-1 Organization Message - Canadian Army 181202Z JUL 13
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i Defence, National (24 October 2018). "The Brockville Rifles". www.canada.ca. Retrieved 27 August 2022.
  3. ^ "The Brockville Rifles [Canada]". web.archive.org. 16 November 2007. Archived from the original on 16 November 2007. Retrieved 27 August 2022.
  4. ^ A-DH-267-003/AF-002 -- Volume 3: Combat Arms Regiments Part Two: Infantry Regiments
  5. ^ A-DH-267-003/AF-002 -- Volume 3: Combat Arms Regiments Part Two: Infantry Regiments
  6. ^ "The Brockville Rifles". www.canada.ca. 24 October 2018. Retrieved 10 March 2022.
  7. ^ Insignia and Lineages of the Canadian Forces A-DH-267-003/AF-002 -- Part Two: Infantry Regiments
  8. ^ Insignia and Lineages of the Canadian Forces A-DH-267-003/AF-002 -- Part Two: Infantry Regiments
  9. ^ "South-West Asia Theatre Honours | Prime Minister of Canada". Archived from the original on 12 May 2014. Retrieved 11 May 2014.
  10. ^ A-DH-267-003/AF-002 -- Volume 3: Combat Arms Regiments Part Two: Infantry Regiments
  11. ^ A-DH-267-003/AF-002 -- Volume 3: Combat Arms Regiments Part Two: Infantry Regiments
  12. ^ Insignia and Lineages of the Canadian Forces A-DH-267-003/AF-002 -- Part Two: Infantry Regiments
  13. ^ "South-West Asia Theatre Honours | Prime Minister of Canada". Archived from the original on 12 May 2014. Retrieved 11 May 2014.

External links[edit]

Order of precedence[edit]

Preceded by The Brockville Rifles Succeeded by