Brofaromine

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Brofaromine
Brofaromine.svg
Clinical data
Routes of
administration
Oral
ATC code
  • none
Legal status
Legal status
  • In general: ℞ (Prescription only)
Pharmacokinetic data
Protein binding 98%
Biological half-life 9-14 hours
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
ChemSpider
UNII
KEGG
ChEMBL
Chemical and physical data
Formula C14H16BrNO2
Molar mass 310.186 g/mol
3D model (Jmol)
  (verify)

Brofaromine (proposed brand name Consonar) is a reversible inhibitor of monoamine oxidase A (RIMA) discovered by Ciba-Geigy.[1] The compound was primarily researched in the treatment of depression and anxiety but its development was dropped before it was brought to market.[2]

Brofaromine also acts as a serotonin reuptake inhibitor, and its dual pharmacologic effects offered promise in the treatment of a wide spectrum of depressed patients while producing less severe anticholinergic side effects in comparison with older standard drugs like the tricyclic antidepressants.

Pharmacology[edit]

Brofaromine is a reversible inhibitor of monoamine oxidase A (RIMA, a type of monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI)) and acts on epinephrine (adrenaline), norepinephrine (noradrenaline), serotonin, and dopamine. Unlike standard MAOIs, possible side effects do not include cardiovascular complications (hypertension) with encephalopathy, liver toxicity or hyperthermia.

References[edit]

  1. ^ US Patent 4210655
  2. ^ Lotufo-Neto F, Trivedi M, Thase ME (1999). "Meta-analysis of the reversible inhibitors of monoamine oxidase type A moclobemide and brofaromine for the treatment of depression". Neuropsychopharmacology. 20 (3): 226–47. doi:10.1016/S0893-133X(98)00075-X. PMID 10063483.  Free full text