Bronson (film)

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Bronson poster.jpg
Theatrical release poster
Directed by Nicolas Winding Refn
Produced by Rupert Preston
Danny Hansford
Written by Brock Norman Brock
Nicolas Winding Refn
Starring Tom Hardy
Music by Johnny Jewel
Cinematography Larry Smith
Edited by Matthew Newman
Aramid Entertainment
Str8jacket Creations
EM Media
4DH Films
Perfume Films
Distributed by Vertigo Films (UK)
Magnet Releasing (US)
Release dates
Running time
92 minutes[1]
Country United Kingdom
Language English
Budget $230,000
Box office $2.3 million[2]

Bronson is a 2008 British fictionalised biographical film co-written and directed by Nicolas Winding Refn and starring Tom Hardy. The film follows the life of notorious prisoner Michael Gordon Peterson, who was renamed Charles Bronson by his fight promoter. Born into a respectable middle-class family, Peterson would nevertheless become one of the United Kingdom's most dangerous criminals, and is known for having spent almost his entire adult life in solitary confinement. Bronson is narrated with humour, blurring the line between comedy and horror.



For the role, Hardy had telephone conversations with the real Charles Bronson, before meeting him in person. During their meetings, Bronson was so impressed by how Hardy had managed to build up his physique for the role and how good he was at imitating him that he shaved off his trademark moustache so that it could be made into a loose-moustache for Hardy to use in the film.[3] The movie was filmed in and around the St. Ann's, Sherwood, Worksop and Welbeck Abbey areas of Nottingham and Nottinghamshire.[4] The post office shown at the beginning of the film is located in Lostwithiel, Cornwall.

Director Refn was not permitted to visit Bronson in prison because he is not from Britain. He was only allowed two phone calls with him.


Box office[edit]

Bronson opened in a single theater in North America and made $10,940. The film ended up earning $104,979 in the U.S with the widest release being in 10 theaters. Internationally it made $2,155,733 for a total of $2,260,712.[2]

Critical response[edit]

Rotten Tomatoes gives the film a "Certified Fresh" score of 76% based on reviews from 79 critics, with an average rating of 6.6 out of 10 with the consensus "Undeniably gripping, Bronson forces the viewer to make some hard decisions about where the line between art and exploitation lies."[5] Metacritic gives the film a "generally favourable" average score of 71 out of 100 based on 22 reviews.[6]

Roger Ebert gave the film three stars out of four and praised the decision not to attempt to rationalise and explain Bronson's behaviour stating in his review, "I suppose, after all, Nicolas Winding Refn, the director and co-writer of "Bronson," was wise to leave out any sort of an explanation. Can you imagine how you'd cringe if the film ended in a flashback of little Mickey undergoing childhood trauma? There is some human behavior beyond our ability to comprehend. I was reading a theory the other day that a few people just happen to be pure evil. I'm afraid I believe it. They lack any conscience, any sense of pity or empathy for their victims. But Bronson is his own victim. How do you figure that?"[7]

Bronson was not initially allowed to view the film, but had said that if his mum liked it he was sure he would as well. According to Refn's DVD audio commentary, his mother said she loved it. On 15 November 2011, he was granted permission to view it. Describing it as "theatrical, creative, and brilliant", Bronson heaped praise upon his portrayer, Hardy, but disagreed on the implied distance between himself and his father and the portrayal of Paul Edmunds as "a bit of a ponce." Nevertheless, he challenged his own family's reaction to the portrayal of his Uncle Jack, stating that he "loved" it, as would Jack himself.[8] Bronson had been originally displeased with the choice of Hardy, but after their first physical meeting, Hardy assured him that he would "fix it."[9] As proven, Bronson's development in trust in Hardy's acting grew, even describing him as "Britain's No. 1 actor."[8]


External links[edit]