Bronze Gate (Diocletian's Palace)

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Bronze Gate
Native name
Croatian: Mjedena vrata
Split-Diokletianpalast-Bronzetor.jpg
Bronze Gate (Porta Meridionalis) as it appered in 2017
TypeGate
LocationSplit, Croatia
Coordinates43°30′27″N 16°26′23″E / 43.50757°N 16.43979°E / 43.50757; 16.43979Coordinates: 43°30′27″N 16°26′23″E / 43.50757°N 16.43979°E / 43.50757; 16.43979
Built4th century AD
Built byDiocletian
Architectural style(s)Roman
Bronze Gate (Diocletian's Palace) is located in Croatia
Bronze Gate (Diocletian's Palace)
Location of Bronze Gate in Croatia

The Bronze Gate (Croatian: Mjedena vrata), Latin: Porta Meridionalis), or "the southern gate" is smaller of the four principal Roman gates into the stari grad (old town) of Split that was once Diocletian's Palace. Originally a sea gate from which the Emporer entered the complex by boat, via through basement rooms in the Imperial Palace.

History[edit]

During the late antiquity, the gate was known as the Porta Meridionalis ("the southern gate") and Diocletian (†316) probably entered his palace through this gate when embarking/disembarking for sea voyages.[1] There was no promenade, instead, the sea lapped up against the walls,[2] so ships could dock at the Palace. It was constructed just below the Peristyle.

In the Middle Ages, the gate was known as the 'Security Gate'.[3]

Today this is the most used gate within the palace, with many tourists starting their guided tours from here, as it has access to the Riva.[4]

Description[edit]

The Bronze Gate was the main gate of Diocletian's palace (via the sea) and are located in the middle of the south wall, today this section of the outer walls are the best preserved.

The style of the gate is completely different from the other three gates of the Palace. It is smaller in size, no decartion and not surported by gatehouses either side. The gate used to be a direct exit to the sea and escape in the event of an attack on the Palace, so in the Middle Ages, the was known as the 'Security Gate'.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Šušnjar, Bogdan, Villa de Diocleziano in Split, Naklada Bošković, Split, 2003. ISBN 953-7090-06-X

External links[edit]