Brooke de Lench

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Brooke de Lench
Born (1952-02-15) February 15, 1952 (age 66)
Plymouth, Massachusetts
Occupation safety advocate
Nationality American
Website
de Lench's Web page

Brooke Cranston de Lench (born February 15, 1952) is an American author, filmmaker, journalist, and advocate. Her advocacy focuses predominantly on athlete safety, welfare and rights in youth sports and in 2013 she founded the non-profit organization MomsTeam Youth Sports Safety Institute, frequently referred to as "MomsTeam". That same year she had her directorial debut with the film The Smartest Team: Making High School Football Safer, which aired on PBS.[1]

Personal life[edit]

De Lench was born in Plymouth, Massachusetts, raised in Duxbury, Massachusetts and Stratton Mountain, Vermont and later practiced lacrosse in high school.[2] She currently lives in Concord, Massachusetts and is the mother of triplet sons.[3]

Career[edit]

De Lench has participated in awareness campaigns, initiatives, and organizations that focus on raising awareness on athlete safety, welfare and rights in youth sports,[4] and has spoken on this topic at several national summits and symposia.[5][6]

In 2003 she launched the nonprofit organization Teams of Angels, which supports families of children that have died or been severely injured in youth sports.[7] In 2013 she founded the MomsTeam Youth Sports Safety Institute, which raises awareness of health, nutrition and safety best practices in youth sports.[8] De Lench serves as the organization's executive director and in 2014 she, along with MomsTeam, organized the SmartTeams Play Safe summit at the Harvard Medical School.[9] Through the organization she has also launched a program called SmartTeams, which endorses the use of ideas and new technology that could minimize common issues with youth sports.[10][11]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Home Team Advantage: The Critical Role of Mothers in Youth Sports (2006)[12]

Filmography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Klein, Jeff (4 October 2014). "Canadian District Goes to School on Concussions". nytimes.com. The New York Times. Retrieved 17 November 2014. 
  2. ^ Ducharme, Jamie (24 September 2014). "Concord Resident Speaks Out on Youth Sports Safety". Bostonmagazine.com. Boston Magazine. Retrieved 17 November 2014. 
  3. ^ Sullivan, James (24 October 2014). "Concerns bubble up as more young athletes specialize earlier". Bostonglobe.com. Boston Globe. Retrieved 17 November 2014. 
  4. ^ "MomsTeam's Brooke de Lench to take part in concussion initiative". NFL Evolution. National Football League. 24 January 2014. Retrieved 17 November 2014. 
  5. ^ "Roundtable Discussion "Playing Safety: The Future of Youth Football?"" (PDF). 9 November 2012. Retrieved 20 May 2015. 
  6. ^ de Lench, Brooke; Straus, Lindsey Barton. "Standard-Setting by Non-Governmental Agencies in the Field of Sports Safety Equipment: Promoting the Interests of Consumers or Manufacturers?". Journal of Business & Technology Law. University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. 10 (1): 46–60. Retrieved 20 May 2015. 
  7. ^ "Summary for: TEAMS OF ANGELS, INC". Massachusetts State. Retrieved 17 November 2014. 
  8. ^ "NFL Marketing To Moms". ESPN.go. 7 February 2014. Retrieved 17 November 2014. 
  9. ^ Schwartz, Jessica. "My Experience at the Inaugural MomsTeam Institute Youth Sports Safety Summit at Harvard Medical School September 15, 2014". pt2go.co. Retrieved 17 November 2014. 
  10. ^ Hohler, Bob (29 December 2013). "The concussion doctor's tangled interests". www.bostonglobe.com. Boston Globe. Retrieved 17 November 2014. 
  11. ^ "Concussion sensors aim to help young football players". The Today Show. Today (U.S. TV program). 17 September 2014. Retrieved 17 November 2014. 
  12. ^ "Home Team Advantage (review)". Booklist. Retrieved 29 May 2015. 
  13. ^ Moffie, Jonathan. "Jonathan Moffie, CUNY Sports Report co-founder and current SI Now producer, sits down for a Q&A session with The Smartest Team". City University of New York. Retrieved 17 November 2014. 
  14. ^ Wright, Scott. "Newcastle football team gets smarter about head injuries". News OK. Retrieved 29 May 2015. 

External links[edit]