Brooklyn Center, Minnesota

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Brooklyn Center
Official seal of Brooklyn Center
Motto(s): 
At The Center
Location of the city of Brooklyn Center within Hennepin County, Minnesota
Location of the city of Brooklyn Center
within Hennepin County, Minnesota
Coordinates: 45°4′9″N 93°18′50″W / 45.06917°N 93.31389°W / 45.06917; -93.31389Coordinates: 45°4′9″N 93°18′50″W / 45.06917°N 93.31389°W / 45.06917; -93.31389
CountryUnited States
StateMinnesota
CountyHennepin
Settled1852
Incorporated (village)1911
Incorporated (city)1966
Government
 • TypeCouncil/Manager
 • MayorMike Elliott[1]
 • City ManagerVacant
Area
 • City8.38 sq mi (21.71 km2)
 • Land8.00 sq mi (20.73 km2)
 • Water0.38 sq mi (0.98 km2)
Elevation
853 ft (260 m)
Population
 • City33,782
 • Density4,222.75/sq mi (1,630.41/km2)
 • Metro
3,629,190
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central (CST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
ZIP Codes
55429–55430
Area code(s)763
FIPS code27-07948
GNIS feature ID0640508[4]
Websiteci.brooklyn-center.mn.us

Brooklyn Center is a city in Hennepin County, Minnesota, United States. The city is on the west bank of the Mississippi River on the northwest border of Minneapolis. The population was 33,782 at the 2020 census. Brooklyn Center is one of the original inner-ring suburbs of Minneapolis–Saint Paul, a metro area with about 3.63 million residents.

Formed as the center of local trade in the former Brooklyn Township since 1873, the rural area farmed market gardening for nearby Minneapolis's growing population. The village of Brooklyn Center incorporated in 1911, splitting from Brooklyn Township, to avoid annexation by the expanding city of Minneapolis. It incorporated as a city in 1966. The city became a bedroom community and industrial job center following postwar growth. It was the site of the regional mall Brookdale Center. The headquarters of Caribou Coffee moved into the city in 2004.[5]

History[edit]

Known as the center of local trade in the former Brooklyn Township since 1873, the rural area farmed market gardening for nearby Minneapolis's growing population. With fears the downtown city would continue annexation, the village of Brooklyn Center was established in 1911.[6] The city of Brooklyn Center was incorporated in 1966. The city contains the site of the historic Earle Brown farm, home to Earle Brown, founder of the Minnesota State Patrol and first sheriff of Hennepin County. The farm has been refurbished and now contains a bed and breakfast, event center, and office spaces.

On April 11, 2021, a Brooklyn Center police officer shot and killed Daunte Wright during an attempted arrest. Wright's death resulted in protests and looting.[7][8]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has an area of 8.34 square miles (21.60 km2), of which 7.96 square miles (20.62 km2) is land and 0.38 square miles (0.98 km2) is water.[9]

Interstates 94 and 694 and Minnesota State Highways 100 and 252 are four of the main routes in Brooklyn Center.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1920788
19301,34470.6%
19401,87039.1%
19504,284129.1%
196024,356468.5%
197035,17344.4%
198031,230−11.2%
199028,887−7.5%
200029,1721.0%
201030,1043.2%
202033,78212.2%
U.S. Decennial Census[10]
2018 Estimate[11]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[3] of 2010, 30,104 people, 10,756 households, and 7,010 families resided in the city. The population density was 3,781.9 inhabitants per square mile (1,460.2/km2). There were 11,640 housing units at an average density of 1,462.3 per square mile (564.6/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 49.1% White, 25.9% African American, 0.8% Native American, 14.3% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 5.4% from other races, and 4.4% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 9.6% of the population.

There were 10,756 households, of which 36.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 40.4% were married couples living together, 18.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 6.6% had a male householder with no wife present, and 34.8% were non-families. 27.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.78 and the average family size was 3.43.

The city's median age was 32.6. 27.6% of residents were under the age of 18; 10.1% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 28.1% were from 25 to 44; 22.1% were from 45 to 64; and 12.2% were 65 or older. The gender makeup was 48.7% male and 51.3% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census of 2000, 29,172 people, 11,430 households, and 7,383 families resided in the city. The population density was 3,672.0 people per square mile (1,418.6/km2). There were 11,598 housing units at an average density of 1,459.9 per square mile (564.0/km2). The city's racial makeup was 71.39% White, 14.09% African American, 0.87% Native American, 8.79% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 1.49% from other races, and 3.36% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.82% of the population.

There were 11,430 households, of which 29.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.3% were married couples living together, 13.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.4% were non-families. 28.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 3.11.

In the city, the population was spread out, with 25.1% under the age of 18, 9.6% from 18 to 24, 30.1% from 25 to 44, 19.8% from 45 to 64, and 15.4% who were 65 or older. The median age was 35. For every 100 females, there were 94.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.8 males.

The city's median household income was $44,570, and the median family income was $52,006. Males had a median income of $36,031 versus $27,755 for females. The city's per capita income was $19,695. About 4.7% of families and 7.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.7% of those under age 18 and 5.6% of those 65 or older.

Economy[edit]

Federal Bureau of Investigation office in Brooklyn Center

When the Minnesota Educational Computing Consortium, also known as MECC, existed, its headquarters were in Brooklyn Center.[12][13]

Brooklyn Center is home to regional favorite Surly Brewing Company.

Minnesota Martial Arts Academy, now known simply as the Academy, an MMA training center, is in Brooklyn Center. It has trained such notable fighters as Sean Sherk and Brock Lesnar.

Brooklyn Center is home to the FBI's new Minneapolis field office, which began construction in August 2010.[14]

Top employers[edit]

According to Brooklyn Center's 2011 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report,[15] the top employers in the city are:

# Employer # of Employees
1 Medtronic 1,100
2 Brooklyn Center Schools #286 385
3 Caribou Coffee 250
4 Osseo Area School District 279 185
5 City of Brooklyn Center 160
6 TCF 150
7 Target 146
8 TCR 145
9 Cub Foods 130
10 Walmart 129

Government[edit]

Brooklyn Center is in Minnesota's 5th congressional district.

Presidential election results 1960–2020
Precinct General Election Results[16]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2020 25.9% 3,609 71.6% 9,973 2.5% 352
2016 26.4% 3,321 65.7% 8,253 7.9% 987
2012 27.9% 3,783 69.7% 9,444 2.4% 332
2008 31.9% 4,238 66.0% 8,757 2.1% 279
2004 36.7% 5,047 62.0% 8,530 1.3% 173
2000 36.3% 4,740 56.9% 7,434 6.8% 897
1996 30.3% 3,884 58.8% 7,528 10.9% 1,388
1992 29.7% 4,606 48.3% 7,491 22.0% 3,420
1988 41.8% 6,067 58.2% 8,461 0.0% 0
1984 46.0% 7,385 54.0% 8,667 0.0% 0
1980 35.9% 5,881 55.1% 9,036 9.0% 1,483
1976 37.6% 6,257 60.8% 10,115 1.6% 272
1972 50.9% 7,512 46.9% 6,924 2.2% 315
1968 33.8% 4,239 61.9% 7,757 4.3% 535
1964 33.4% 3,833 66.4% 7,633 0.2% 26
1960 44.6% 4,605 55.1% 5,683 0.3% 27

Education[edit]

Globe University and Minnesota School of Business was a for-profit school network that Minnesota stopped from operating in the state in 2016,[17] and of which all locations permanently closed by 2017 because it lost its federal student aid.[18]

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Zamora, Karen (January 2, 2019). "Brooklyn Center welcomes new mayor who reflects its growing diversity". Star Tribune. Retrieved January 2, 2019. Mike Elliott, who came from Liberia at age 11, said the city he will lead "put arms around us."
  2. ^ "2019 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 26, 2020.
  3. ^ a b "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 13, 2012.
  4. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. October 25, 2007. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  5. ^ Sam Black Staff reporter (September 19, 2003). "Caribou moving headquarters to suburb". Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal. Retrieved November 7, 2008.
  6. ^ "City of Brooklyn Center - History". Retrieved Apr 14, 2021.
  7. ^ Belcamino, Kristi (2021-04-11). "Man dies after being shot by police in Brooklyn Center; BCA investigating". Pioneer Press. Retrieved 2021-04-11.
  8. ^ Staff (2021-04-11). "Protesters Clash With Police In Brooklyn Center After Deadly Officer-Involved Shooting". WCCO. Retrieved 2021-04-11.
  9. ^ "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 2, 2012. Retrieved November 13, 2012.
  10. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". Census.gov. Retrieved May 29, 2013.
  11. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 14, 2019.
  12. ^ "The Road to MECC." MECC. February 3, 1997. Retrieved on June 1, 2010.
  13. ^ "Brooklyn Center city, Minnesota Archived 2011-06-06 at the Wayback Machine." U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved on June 1, 2010.
  14. ^ Baca, Maria Elena. "New FBI field office in Brooklyn Center seen as a catalyst." Star Tribune. August 31, 2010. Retrieved on October 29, 2011
  15. ^ City of Brooklyn Center CAFR
  16. ^ "Office of the Minnesota Secretary of State - Election Results". Archived from the original on February 22, 2021. Retrieved February 22, 2021.
  17. ^ "Minnesota operations at 2 for-profit colleges". MPR News. Retrieved Apr 14, 2021.
  18. ^ Turtinen, Melissa. "Globe University and MN School of Business are closing all campuses". Bring Me The News. Retrieved Apr 14, 2021.

Further reading[edit]

  • Hoisington, Daniel John (2001). The Brooklyns: A history of Brooklyn Center and Brooklyn Park, Minnesota. Brooklyn Center Historical Society, ISBN 978-0970843906.

External links[edit]