Brooklyn Center, Minnesota

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Brooklyn Center
Official seal of Brooklyn Center
Motto: 
At The Center
Location of the city of Brooklyn Center within Hennepin County, Minnesota
Location of the city of Brooklyn Center
within Hennepin County, Minnesota
Coordinates: 45°4′9″N 93°18′50″W / 45.06917°N 93.31389°W / 45.06917; -93.31389Coordinates: 45°4′9″N 93°18′50″W / 45.06917°N 93.31389°W / 45.06917; -93.31389
CountryUnited States
StateMinnesota
CountyHennepin
Settled1852
Incorporated (village)1911
Incorporated (city)1966
Government
 • TypeCouncil/Manager
 • MayorApril Graves [1]
 • City ManagerReggie Edwards
Area
 • City8.38 sq mi (21.71 km2)
 • Land8.00 sq mi (20.73 km2)
 • Water0.38 sq mi (0.98 km2)
Elevation
853 ft (260 m)
Population
 • City33,782
 • Estimate 
(2021)[4]
32,880
 • Density4,221.17/sq mi (1,629.76/km2)
 • Metro
3,690,512
Time zoneUTC−6 (CST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
ZIP Codes
55429–55430
Area code763
FIPS code27-07948
GNIS feature ID0640508[5]
Websiteci.brooklyn-center.mn.us

Brooklyn Center is a first-ring suburban city in Hennepin County, Minnesota, United States in the Minneapolis–Saint Paul metropolitan area. In 1911, the area became a village formed from parts of Brooklyn Township and Crystal Lake Township.[6] In 1966, Brooklyn Center became a charter city.[7] The city has commercial and industrial development. The majority of land use is single-family homes.[8] The population was 33,782 at the 2020 census,[3] and the city has become the most ethnically diverse community in the state.[9]

History[edit]

Pioneers organized town governments for Brooklyn Township and Crystal Lake Township when Minnesota became a state in 1858. Osseo Road was a main thoroughfare that brought settlers to an area centered around their school, post office, store, meeting hall, and Baptist and Methodist churches. That location thrived as a market gardening community. It abutted the encroaching development of Minneapolis to the south.[6]

Steps were taken to protect the area from annexation by Minneapolis and to retain "simpler public business methods, and extra police protection" by incorporation.[10] The Hennepin County Board of Commissioners accepted a petition to incorporate the Village of Brooklyn Center on January 16, 1911.[11] An election followed, the boundaries were set, and documents filed with the state on February 18, 1911. P.W. Reidhead was the first president. The population was 500.[6]

By 1940, the village saw a need for more organized planning to deal with issues such as sewage and traffic. In 1942, a Planning Commission was established. Farmers were selling their valuable land to housing developers. The decade saw unprecedented population growth, reaching 4,000 by 1950. Brookdale, a new shopping concept by Dayton’s, was constructed in 1960[12] when the population had grown to over 24,000. In 1963, even more new opportunities for commercial development were presented with the estate of Earle Brown, deceased, the heir of Captain John Martin who had been one of the wealthiest men in Minneapolis.[13]

Earle Brown Heritage Center, was the former Cap Martin country estate, built in 1878 and willed to his grandson Earle Brown in 1901. The buildings included the family home, office and garage, housing for the workers, a pump house, multiple barns, a hippodrome, an antique carriage collection, and a restored lumber bunkhouse and cook shanty. It is now a historic site in Brooklyn Center owned by the city and developed into a conference and event center.

Mound Cemetery of Brooklyn Center has been owned and managed by a not-for-profit organization since 1862. Its mission is to provide cemetery and perpetual care services to the public, and to preserve the historical burial grounds of the founding families of Brooklyn Township.

The Brooklyn Historical Society, is a 501(c3) nonprofit all-volunteer organization founded in 1970. Its mission is to research, preserve, and provide access to historical information about Brooklyn Township – yesterday, today, and tomorrow. The Society has historical displays at the city halls of Brooklyn Center and Brooklyn Park, and the Earle Brown Heritage Center. Its facility is in Brooklyn Park.

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has an area of 8.34 square miles (21.60 km2), of which 7.96 square miles (20.62 km2) is land and 0.38 square miles (0.98 km2) is water.[14] All of Brooklyn Center is in the Upper Mississippi Watershed Basin.[15] The Mississippi River is the eastern boundary of the city and is part of the Mississippi National River and Recreation Area of Minnesota. The North Mississippi Regional Park,[16] at 5700 Lyndale Avenue North, is managed by Three Rivers Park District Board, on which Brooklyn Center is represented in District 3.[17]

Southwestern Brooklyn Center includes Upper Twin Lake[18] (117 acres)[19] and connects to a chain of lakes that discharge into Shingle Creek, which discharges into the Mississippi River.[20] Shingle Creek also runs through Palmer Lake.[21] The city is a member of Shingle Creek and West Mississippi Watershed Management Commission, which manages the lakes, streams, and wetlands in this area.[22] Palmer Lake Park is a natural environmental preserve of lake and marsh habitat on over 200 acres.[23]

All of Brooklyn Center is in the state's Deciduous Forest Biome.[24] The Plant Hardiness Zone is 4B, with an average minimum extreme temperature of -25 to -20 Fahrenheit.[25] The city has developed and maintains 26 parks and a 20-mile trail system.[26] The majority of land use is single-family homes.[8] The historical route, Osseo Road, was renamed Brooklyn Boulevard by both Brooklyn Center and Brooklyn Park in 1969.[27] Interstates 94 and 694 and Minnesota State Highways 100 and 252 are four of the main routes in Brooklyn Center. 

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1920788
19301,34470.6%
19401,87039.1%
19504,284129.1%
196024,356468.5%
197035,17344.4%
198031,230−11.2%
199028,887−7.5%
200029,1721.0%
201030,1043.2%
202033,78212.2%
2021 (est.)32,880[4]−2.7%
U.S. Decennial Census[28]
2020 Census[3]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census of 2010, 30,104 people, 10,756 households, and 7,010 families resided in the city. The population density was 3,781.9 inhabitants per square mile (1,460.2/km2). There were 11,640 housing units at an average density of 1,462.3 per square mile (564.6/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 49.1% White, 25.9% African American, 0.8% Native American, 14.3% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 5.4% from other races, and 4.4% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 9.6% of the population.

There were 10,756 households, of which 36.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 40.4% were married couples living together, 18.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 6.6% had a male householder with no wife present, and 34.8% were non-families. 27.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.78 and the average family size was 3.43.

The city's median age was 32.6. 27.6% of residents were under the age of 18; 10.1% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 28.1% were from 25 to 44; 22.1% were from 45 to 64; and 12.2% were 65 or older. The gender makeup was 48.7% male and 51.3% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census of 2000, 29,172 people, 11,430 households, and 7,383 families resided in the city. The population density was 3,672.0 inhabitants per square mile (1,417.8/km2). There were 11,598 housing units at an average density of 1,459.9 per square mile (563.7/km2). The city's racial makeup was 71.39% White, 14.09% African American, 0.87% Native American, 8.79% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 1.49% from other races, and 3.36% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.82% of the population.

There were 11,430 households, of which 29.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.3% were married couples living together, 13.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.4% were non-families. 28.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 3.11.

In the city, the population was spread out, with 25.1% under the age of 18, 9.6% from 18 to 24, 30.1% from 25 to 44, 19.8% from 45 to 64, and 15.4% who were 65 or older. The median age was 35. For every 100 females, there were 94.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.8 males.

The city's median household income was $44,570, and the median family income was $52,006. Males had a median income of $36,031 versus $27,755 for females. The city's per capita income was $19,695. About 4.7% of families and 7.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.7% of those under age 18 and 5.6% of those 65 or older.

Economy[edit]

Federal Bureau of Investigation office in Brooklyn Center

When the Minnesota Educational Computing Consortium, also known as MECC, existed, its headquarters were in Brooklyn Center.[29][30]

Brooklyn Center is home to regional favorite Surly Brewing Company.

Minnesota Martial Arts Academy, now known simply as the Academy, an MMA training center, is in Brooklyn Center. It has trained such notable fighters as Sean Sherk and Brock Lesnar.

Brooklyn Center is home to the FBI's new Minneapolis field office, which began construction in August 2010.[31]

Top employers[edit]

According to Brooklyn Center's 2011 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report,[32] the top employers in the city are:

# Employer # of Employees
1 Medtronic 1,100
2 Brooklyn Center Schools #286 385
3 Caribou Coffee 250
4 Osseo Area School District 279 185
5 City of Brooklyn Center 160
6 TCF 150
7 Target 146
8 Showdown Displays 145
9 Cub Foods 130
10 Walmart 129

Government[edit]

Brooklyn Center is in Minnesota's 5th congressional district.

Presidential election results 1960–2020
Precinct General Election Results[33]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2020 25.9% 3,609 71.6% 9,973 2.5% 352
2016 26.4% 3,321 65.7% 8,253 7.9% 987
2012 27.9% 3,783 69.7% 9,444 2.4% 332
2008 31.9% 4,238 66.0% 8,757 2.1% 279
2004 36.7% 5,047 62.0% 8,530 1.3% 173
2000 36.3% 4,740 56.9% 7,434 6.8% 897
1996 30.3% 3,884 58.8% 7,528 10.9% 1,388
1992 29.7% 4,606 48.3% 7,491 22.0% 3,420
1988 41.8% 6,067 58.2% 8,461 0.0% 0
1984 46.0% 7,385 54.0% 8,667 0.0% 0
1980 35.9% 5,881 55.1% 9,036 9.0% 1,483
1976 37.6% 6,257 60.8% 10,115 1.6% 272
1972 50.9% 7,512 46.9% 6,924 2.2% 315
1968 33.8% 4,239 61.9% 7,757 4.3% 535
1964 33.4% 3,833 66.4% 7,633 0.2% 26
1960 44.6% 4,605 55.1% 5,683 0.3% 27

Law enforcement[edit]

The Brooklyn Center Police Department was established in 1953, the city having previously had elected constables and appointed marshals.[34] The department has about 47 sworn police officers;[35] press reports indicate that none of them live in the city.[36]

The department is organized into a number of divisions and units:[37]

  • Administration Division
  • Community Services Division
    • Juvenile Crime Unit
    • Street Crimes Unit
  • Investigations Division
    • Violent Offender's Task Force Officer
    • Auto Theft Prevention Officer
  • Patrol Division
  • Records & Property Division

Education[edit]

Globe University and Minnesota School of Business was a for-profit school network that Minnesota stopped from operating in the state in 2016,[38] and of which all locations permanently closed by 2017 because it lost its federal student aid.[39]

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Zamora, Karen (January 2, 2019). "Brooklyn Center welcomes new mayor who reflects its growing diversity". Star Tribune. Retrieved January 2, 2019. Mike Elliott, who came from Liberia at age 11, said the city he will lead "put arms around us."
  2. ^ "2020 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 24, 2022.
  3. ^ a b c "Explore Census Data". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 2, 2022.
  4. ^ a b "City and Town Population Totals: 2020-2021". United States Census Bureau. August 2, 2022. Retrieved August 2, 2022.
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. October 25, 2007. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  6. ^ a b c The Brooklyns : a history of Brooklyn Center and Brooklyn Park, Minnesota. Daniel John Hoisington, Brooklyn Historical Society. Brooklyn Center, MN: Brooklyn Historical Society. 2001. ISBN 0-9708439-0-9. OCLC 47669661.{{cite book}}: CS1 maint: others (link)
  7. ^ "City Charter and Charter Commissions". City of Brooklyn Center. Archived from the original on April 15, 2021. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  8. ^ a b "Hennepin County Land Use and Cover" (PDF). Minnesota Geospatial Information Office. Archived (PDF) from the original on April 18, 2013. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  9. ^ Sullivan, Becky (April 18, 2021). "Brooklyn Center, Minnesota's Most Diverse City, Is In The Spotlight After Shooting". NPR. Retrieved November 30, 2021.
  10. ^ "County Lets Two Villages". Star Tribune (Minneapolis, Minnesota). February 20, 1911. Retrieved November 30, 2021.
  11. ^ "County Commissioners Board". Star Tribune (Minneapolis, Minnesota). January 20, 1911. Retrieved November 30, 2021.
  12. ^ "Work Begins at Dayton's Brookdale Shop Center". The Minneapolis Star (Minneapolis, Minnesota). September 28, 1960. Retrieved November 30, 2021.
  13. ^ Hallberg, Jane, Leone Howe, and Mary J. Gustafson. (1966). History of the Earle Brown Farm. Brooklyn Center, Minn.: Brooklyn Historical Society.{{cite book}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  14. ^ "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 2, 2012. Retrieved November 13, 2012.
  15. ^ "Minnesota's watershed basins". Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Archived from the original on June 16, 2002. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  16. ^ "North Mississippi Regional Park". Three Rivers Park District. Archived from the original on July 2, 2017. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  17. ^ "Commissioners". Three Rivers Park District. Archived from the original on October 1, 2019. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  18. ^ "Upper Twin (27004201)". Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Archived from the original on December 3, 2021. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  19. ^ "Minnesota LakeBrowser". University of Minnesota. Archived from the original on August 3, 2017. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  20. ^ "Twin and Ryan Lakes - Excess Nutrients: TMDL Project". Minnesota Pollution Control Agency. Archived from the original on September 20, 2020. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  21. ^ "Palmer (27005900)". Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Archived from the original on December 3, 2021. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  22. ^ "Watershed Management Commissions". Shingle Creek and West Mississippi Watershed Management Commissions. Archived from the original on January 6, 2002. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  23. ^ "Parks and Trails". City of Brooklyn Center. Archived from the original on December 3, 2021. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  24. ^ "Biomes of Minnesota". Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Archived from the original on October 20, 2002. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  25. ^ "Find Your Hardiness Zone". Minnesota Horticultural Society. March 17, 2021. Archived from the original on April 20, 2021. Retrieved December 2, 2021.
  26. ^ "Parks Amenities Finder". Archived from the original on December 3, 2021. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  27. ^ "Road To Be Renamed". the Minneapolis Star. June 10, 1969. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  28. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". Census.gov. Retrieved May 29, 2013.
  29. ^ "The Road to MECC." MECC. February 3, 1997. Retrieved on June 1, 2010.
  30. ^ "Brooklyn Center city, Minnesota Archived June 6, 2011, at the Wayback Machine." U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved on June 1, 2010.
  31. ^ Baca, Maria Elena. "New FBI field office in Brooklyn Center seen as a catalyst." Star Tribune. August 31, 2010. Retrieved on October 29, 2011
  32. ^ City of Brooklyn Center CAFR
  33. ^ "Office of the Minnesota Secretary of State - Election Results". Archived from the original on February 22, 2021. Retrieved February 22, 2021.
  34. ^ "History of the Police Department". City of Brooklyn Center. Archived from the original on April 14, 2021. Retrieved April 14, 2021.
  35. ^ "History of the Police Department". City of Brooklyn Center. Archived from the original on April 14, 2021. Retrieved April 14, 2021.
  36. ^ Bogel-Burroughs, Nicholas; Bosman, Julie (April 14, 2021). "Police Officer Who Shot and Killed Daunte Wright Was Training Others". New York Times. Archived from the original on December 28, 2021. Retrieved April 14, 2021.
  37. ^ "History of the Police Department". City of Brooklyn Center. Archived from the original on April 14, 2021. Retrieved April 14, 2021.
  38. ^ "Minnesota operations at 2 for-profit colleges". MPR News. Retrieved April 14, 2021.
  39. ^ Turtinen, Melissa. "Globe University and MN School of Business are closing all campuses". Bring Me The News. Retrieved April 14, 2021.

Further reading[edit]

  • A Church Grows in Brooklyn: A History of Two Hundred Years of Methodism in America, a History of the One Hundred Thirty Years of Brooklyn United Methodist Church. Brooklyn Center, Minn: Brooklyn United Methodist Church, 1984.
  • Hallberg, Jane, Leone Howe, and Mary J. Gustafson. History of the Earle Brown Farm. Brooklyn Center, Minn.: Brooklyn Historical Society, 1996.
  • Hoisington, Daniel John (2001). The Brooklyns: A history of Brooklyn Center and Brooklyn Park, Minnesota. Brooklyn Center Historical Society, ISBN 978-0970843906.
  • Snodgrass, Pat. Brooklyn Park and Brooklyn Center. Chicago, IL: Arcadia Pub, 2009. ISBN 978-1531639723

External links[edit]