Brooks County, Texas

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Brooks County
The Brooks County Courthouse in Falfurrias
The Brooks County Courthouse in Falfurrias
Map of Texas highlighting Brooks County
Location within the U.S. state of Texas
Map of the United States highlighting Texas
Texas's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 27°02′N 98°13′W / 27.04°N 98.21°W / 27.04; -98.21
Country United States
State Texas
Founded1911
Named forJames Brooks
SeatFalfurrias
Largest cityFalfurrias
Area
 • Total944 sq mi (2,440 km2)
 • Land943 sq mi (2,440 km2)
 • Water0.3 sq mi (0.8 km2)  0.03%%
Population
 (2010)
 • Total7,223
 • Density7.7/sq mi (3.0/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district15th
Websitewww.co.brooks.tx.us

Brooks County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 7,223.[1] Its county seat is Falfurrias.[2] The county is named for James Abijah Brooks, a Texas Ranger and legislator.

The county faces a range of challenges due to immigration issues. Though it lies about 80 miles north of the border, it is a main route for migrants crossing from Mexico. The open, dry terrain and hot summer temperatures cause many immigrants to die, leading some to dub the area a "Death Valley" for migrants.[3][4][5]

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 944 sq mi (2,440 km2), of which 943 sq mi (2,440 km2) are land and 0.3 sq mi (0.78 km2) (0.03%) is covered by water.[6]

Major highways[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
19204,560
19305,90129.4%
19406,3627.8%
19509,19544.5%
19608,609−6.4%
19708,005−7.0%
19808,4285.3%
19908,204−2.7%
20007,976−2.8%
20107,223−9.4%
2019 (est.)7,093[7]−1.8%
U.S. Decennial Census[8]
1850–2010[9] 2010–2014[1]

As of the 2010 United States Census, 7,223 people were living in the county; 89.6% were White, 0.5% African American, 0.3% Native American, 0.3% Asian, 7.9% of some other race, and 1.4% of two or more races. About 91.2% were Hispanic or Latino (of any race).

As of the census[10] of 2000, 7,976 people, 2,711 households, and 2,079 families were residing in the county. The population density was 8 people/sq mi (3/km2). The 3,203 housing units averaged 3 per sq mi (1/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 75.84% White, 0.19% African American, 0.46% Native American, 0.09% Asian, 0.08% Pacific Islander, 21.58% from other races, and 1.77% from two or more races. About 91.57% of the population was Hispanic or Latino of any race.

Of the 2,711 households, 38.90% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.20% were married couples living together, 19.10% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.30% were not families. About 21.40% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.30% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.92, and the average family size was 3.38.

In the county, the age distribution was 31.60% under the age of 18, 8.90% from 18 to 24, 23.40% from 25 to 44, 21.70% from 45 to 64, and 14.40% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 94.20 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.90 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $18,622, and for a family was $22,473. Males had a median income of $23,051 versus $16,103 for females. The per capita income for the county was $10,234. About 36.90% of families and 40.20% of the population were below the poverty line, including 51.70% of those under age 18 and 30.40% of those age 65 or over.

Politics[edit]

While Texas has become a stronghold of the Republican Party in the 21st century, Brooks County rests in the oldest extant Democratic stronghold in the state. It has never voted for a Republican presidential candidate since its creation in 1911.

Until 2020, no Republican had received more than 35% of the vote in the county since Richard Nixon in his 1972 landslide, and no Democrat since George McGovern that same year had received less than 65%. McGovern is one of only three Democrats, the others being Adlai Stevenson in 1956, and Joe Biden in 2020, to have received less than 60% of the vote in Brooks County since it first participated in presidential elections in 1912. In 2020, the county had a swing toward the Republican party in the national election. Despite the county still voting Democratic, it only gave 59% of the vote to Biden; his performance was the worst by a Democrat in Brooks County since 1956. Donald Trump was the first Republican to carry over 40% of the county's vote since 1972.

The only instance of Brooks County having ever cast its votes for a Republican was in 2010, when Comptroller Susan Combs won it during her re-election, as no Democrat filed to run.[11]

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results[12]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2020 40.2% 998 59.2% 1,470 0.6% 16
2016 23.6% 613 74.6% 1,937 1.8% 46
2012 21.1% 507 78.5% 1,886 0.4% 10
2008 24.1% 556 75.7% 1,747 0.3% 6
2004 31.6% 845 68.2% 1,823 0.2% 6
2000 22.9% 556 76.3% 1,854 0.9% 21
1996 11.8% 413 84.4% 2,945 3.7% 130
1992 15.5% 585 75.9% 2,856 8.6% 324
1988 17.4% 608 81.9% 2,859 0.6% 22
1984 24.8% 896 74.8% 2,702 0.4% 16
1980 23.4% 780 74.7% 2,488 2.0% 65
1976 18.7% 641 81.1% 2,782 0.2% 6
1972 40.2% 1,117 59.6% 1,657 0.3% 7
1968 20.5% 534 73.1% 1,904 6.4% 166
1964 14.9% 402 85.1% 2,299 0.1% 2
1960 22.6% 567 77.0% 1,934 0.4% 10
1956 41.8% 802 57.7% 1,108 0.5% 10
1952 33.9% 809 66.1% 1,577 0.0% 1
1948 16.9% 217 80.3% 1,029 2.8% 36
1944 22.4% 142 63.5% 403 14.2% 90
1940 23.0% 201 76.6% 670 0.5% 4
1936 24.2% 117 75.6% 365 0.2% 1
1932 12.3% 86 87.2% 608 0.4% 3
1928 32.5% 160 67.5% 332
1924 22.0% 59 76.5% 205 1.5% 4
1920 22.6% 37 77.4% 127
1916 37.7% 63 60.5% 101 1.8% 3
1912 2.2% 13 69.1% 402 28.7% 167

Communities[edit]

City[edit]

Census-designated places[edit]

Unincorporated community[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on October 23, 2015. Retrieved December 8, 2013.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  3. ^ (9 July 2014). Texas' Brooks County Is 'Death Valley' for Migrants, NBC News
  4. ^ Saslow, Eli. "Going it alone". www.washingtonpost.com. The Washington Post. Retrieved 10 August 2014.
  5. ^ (10 July 2018). The Brutal Border, U.S. News & World Report
  6. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved April 19, 2015.
  7. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". United States Census Bureau. May 24, 2020. Retrieved May 27, 2020.
  8. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved April 19, 2015.
  9. ^ "Texas Almanac: Population History of Counties from 1850–2010" (PDF). Texas Almanac. Retrieved April 19, 2015.
  10. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011-05-14.
  11. ^ "2010 Comptroller General General Election Results". David Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections.
  12. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2018-07-19.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 27°02′N 98°13′W / 27.04°N 98.21°W / 27.04; -98.21