Broom, Warwickshire

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Broom
Broom Hall Inn - geograph.org.uk - 134362.jpg
Broom Hall Inn
Broom is located in Warwickshire
Broom
Broom
Broom shown within Warwickshire
Population 550 
OS grid reference SP081529
District
Shire county
Region
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town BIDFORD ON AVON
Postcode district B50
Dialling code 01789
Police Warwickshire
Fire Warwickshire
Ambulance West Midlands
EU Parliament West Midlands
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Warwickshire
52°10′N 1°52′W / 52.17°N 01.87°W / 52.17; -01.87Coordinates: 52°10′N 1°52′W / 52.17°N 01.87°W / 52.17; -01.87

Broom is a village in the civil parish of Bidford-on-Avon in the Stratford district of Warwickshire, England, about 1.7 miles (2.7 km) north-west of Bidford. The village lies in the north-west corner of the parish between the River Avon, which forms its western boundary, and the road from Bidford to Alcester.[1] Broom formerly consisted of two hamlets known as King's Broom and Burnell's Broom. Burnell's Broom, the southern portion, was said to have been depopulated by Sir Rice Griffin of Broom Court during the reign of Elizabeth I.[2] At the 2011 census Broom has a population of 550.

History[edit]

Broom is known as one of the Shakespeare villages. William Shakespeare is said to have joined a party of Stratford folk which set itself to outdrink a drinking club at Bidford-on-Avon, and as a result of his labours in that regard to have fallen asleep under the crab tree of which a descendant is still called Shakespeares tree. When morning dawned his friends wished to renew the encounter but he wisely said "No I have drunk with “Piping Pebworth, Dancing Marston, Haunted Hillboro’, Hungry Grafton, Dodging Exhall, Papist Wixford, Beggarly Broom and Drunken Bidford” and so, presumably, I will drink no more." The story is said to date from the 17th century but of its truth or of any connection of the story or the verse to Shakespeare there is no evidence.[3]

The village is first mentioned in the grant of Ceolred of Mercia to Evesham Abbey of 710 and was included in the list of manors acquired by Abbot Ethelwig, who died 1077, and seized by Odo, Bishop of Bayeux, half brother to William the Conqueror.[1] By 1086, it is recorded in the Domesday Book as part of the lands of the Bishop of Bayeaux, where it reads, "In Ferncombe Hundred, in Brome 4½ hides. Stephen holds from him. 5 men held it freely before 1066. Land for 4 ploughs. In lordship 2; 4 villagers and 10 smallholders with 2 ploughs. Meadow, 14 acres. The value before 1066 40s; later 30s; now 60s."[4]

Governance[edit]

Broom is part of the Bidford and Salford ward of Stratford on Avon District Council and represented by Councillor Jonathan Spence, Conservative. [1] Nationally it is part of Stratford-on-Avon (UK Parliament constituency), whose current Member of Parliament is Nadhim Zahawi of the Conservative Party. It is included in the West Midlands electoral region of the European Parliament and the six members are; Mike Nattrass (UK Independence), Liz Lynne,(Liberal Democrat), Malcolm Harbour (Conservative), Michael Cashman (Labour), Philip Bradbourn OBE (Conservative) and Nicole Sinclaire (UK Independence).

Community facilities[edit]

The village has two pubs, Broom Hall Inn and Broom Tavern, with Broom Hall Inn being larger in size. Many reviewers have stated the local village as "peaceful, tranquil, yet surprisingly popular"[citation needed]. Reviews of Broom Hall are given as 8.6/10. Broom Tavern has recently been re-furbished and is now re-open.

Transport links[edit]

Broom is located near the A46 road giving access southbound to Evesham and junction 9 of the M5 motorway at Tewkesbury and northbound to junction 3 of the M42 motorway at Portway.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b 'Parishes: Bidford', A History of the County of Warwick: Volume 3: Barlichway hundred (1945), pp. 49-57. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=56980 Date accessed: 8 February 2013.
  2. ^ William Dugdale, The Antiquities of Warwickshire, 1656 p729
  3. ^ Highways and Byways in Shakspeares Country, Hutton 1914
  4. ^ Domesday Book for Warwickshire, Phillimore edited by John Morris ISBN 0-85033-141-2

External links[edit]