Brother Anthony

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Brother Anthony.jpg
Born Anthony Graham Teague
(1942-01-03) January 3, 1942 (age 75)
Language Korean
Nationality South Korean
Citizenship South Korean
Korean name
Hangul 안선재
Revised Romanization An Seon-jae
McCune–Reischauer An Sŏn-chae

Brother Anthony (born Anthony Graham Teague; Korean name An Sonjae (Hangul: 안선재)) is a translator, scholar, and member of the Taizé Community who has become a naturalized Korean citizen, and lives in Seoul.

Life[edit]

Brother Anthony of Taizé (An Sonjae) was born in 1942 in Cornwall, UK[1] to Thomas Leslie Teague (February 2, 1914 – March 26, 1985) and Nan Albina Green (July 24, 1911 – February 3, 1991).[2] He studied Medieval and Modern Languages at Oxford and In 1969 he joined the Taizé Community in France, a monastic order composed of men from the Protestant, Anglican and Catholic traditions dedicated to spreading the message of trust and reconciliation.[3] After three years' service in a Philippine slum,[4] in May 1980 Brother Anthony joined other brothers in Korea, invited by the late Archbishop of Seoul, Cardinal Kim Sou-Hwan. He taught English Literature at Sogang University, Seoul, for nearly three decades, while translating works of modern Korean literature and also writing books and articles about literature and translation. Brother Anthony began to translate modern Korean literature in 1988, and since then has published a wide variety of works from such classic Korean authors as Ku Sang, Ko Un, Ch’on Sang-Pyong, So Chong-Ju, Kim Su-Yong, Shin Kyong-Nim, Yi Si-Young, Kim Kwang-Kyu, Ynhui Park, and Yi Mun-yol. In 1994, Brother Anthony became a naturalized Korean citizen, taking on the Korean name An Sonjae, Sonjae being the Korean form of Sudhana, the 'little pilgrim' of the Buddhist scripture The Gandavyuha Sutra. He currently lives in Seoul. Since January 2011 he has been President of the Royal Asiatic Society Korea Branch. He received the Korean government’s Award of Merit, Jade Crown class, in October 2008 for his work in promoting knowledge of Korean literature in the world. He reached retirement age at the start of 2007 and is currently a Professor Emeritus of Sogang University and a Chair-Professor of Dankook University.

Works[edit]

  • Classical and Biblical Backgrounds to Western Literature. Seoul: Sogang University Press, 1989, Revised & expanded, 2000.
  • Literature in English Society before 1660: Volume One, The Middle Ages. Seoul: Sogang University Press, 1997
  • Literature in English Society: Part Two, The Renaissance 1485 - 1660. Seoul: Sogang University Press, 1998
  • Textual Criticism of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales. Brother Anthony and Lee Dong-Chun. Seoul: Seoul National University Press, 2002.
  • The Korean Way of Tea. By Brother Anthony of Taizé and Hong Kyeong-Hee. Seoul: Seoul Selection, 2007
  • Korean Tea Classics. By Brother Anthony of Taizé, Hong Kyeong-Hee and Steven D. Owyoung. Seoul: Seoul Selection, 2010

Translated Works[edit]

Translations are from Korean into English unless otherwise indicated.

Poetry

  • Ku Sang, Wastelands of Fire // Wasteland Poems Forest Books 1990 // DapGae 2000
  • Ku Sang, A Korean Century (Christopher's River; Diary of the Fields) Forest Books 1991 (Out of print)
  • Ku Sang, Infant Splendor (Online text and images) Samseong 1991 (Out of print)
  • Kim Kwang-kyu, Faint Shadows of Love Forest Books 1991 (Out of print)
  • Ko Un, The Sound of my Waves Cornell EAS 1991 // Cornell – DapGae
  • Midang, So Chong-ju, Early Lyrics Forest Books 1991 // Cornell - DapGae 1998
  • Ch'on Sang-pyong, Back to Heaven Cornell EAS 1995 // Cornell - DapGae 1996
  • Ko Un, What? : 108 Zen Poems (formerly Beyond Self) Parallax (Berkeley) 2008 (1997)
  • Shin Kyong-nim, Farmers' Dance Cornell - DapGae 1999
  • Kim Su-young, Shin Kyong-nim, Lee Si-young Variations Cornell 2001
  • Ku Sang, Even the Knots on Quince Trees Tell Tales DapGae 2004
  • Ku Sang, Eternity Today Seoul Selection 2005
  • Kim Young-Moo, Virtual Reality DapGae 2005
  • Kim Kwang-kyu, The Depths of a Clam White Pine Press 2005
  • Ko Un, Ten Thousand Lives Green Integer (Los Angeles) 2005
  • Kim Kwang-Kyu, A Journey to Seoul, DapGae 2006
  • Ko Un, Flowers of a Moment, BOA 2006
  • Chonggi Mah, Eyes of Dew, White Pine Press 2006
  • Special Children, Poems for Planting Love, Seoul Selection 2008
  • Ko Un, Songs for Tomorrow, Green Integer 2009
  • Kim Yeong-Nang, Until Peonies Bloom, MerwinAsia 2010
  • Kim Seung-Hee, Walking on a Washing Line, Cornell EAS 2011
  • Ko Un, ChaRyong's Kiss (bilingual, poems for children about his daughter), Ba-u-sol 2011
  • Ko Un, Himalaya Poems, Green Integer 2011
  • Ko Un, First Person Sorrowful, Bloodaxe 2012
  • (From the French) Brother Pierre Etienne, Selected Poems, Taize, 2013.

Fiction

  • Yi Mun-yol, The Poet Harvill Press 1994 / Vintage 2001
  • Lee Oyoung, The General's Beard / Phantom Legs Homa & Sekey 2002
  • Ko Un, Little Pilgrim Parallax (Berkeley) 2005
  • Bang Hyeon-seok, Off to Battle at Dawn. Translated with Dafna Zur. Asia Publishers, Bilingual Edition

Non-fiction

  • Mok Sun-Ok, My Husband the Poet, Seoul Selection 2006
  • (From the French) Daniel de Montmollin, The Practice of Stoneware Glazes: minerals, rocks, ashes. Paris: La Revue de la Ceramique et du Verre. 2005.

Awards[edit]

  • Korea Times Translation Award
  • Daesan Translation Award (1995)
  • Korean Republic’s Literary Award
  • Korean PEN Translation Award
  • Korean government’s Award of Merit, Jade Crown class, in October 2008.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ko Un (2005). Little Pilgrim. Parallax Press, Berkeley. p. 7383. ISBN 1-888375-43-4. 
  2. ^ Brother Anthony. "Kea, Feock, Baldhu, Grampound, Cookham – The Teague, Dunn, Green & Greswell families – My Family Origins". Anthony's Hompi. Sogang. Retrieved 8 January 2014. 
  3. ^ Yoon, Sun Kyoung. "An interview with Brother Anthony of Taizé". Asymptote. Retrieved 24 November 2013. 
  4. ^ Prater, David (24 November 2009). "An interview with Brother Anthony of Taizé". Cordite Poetry Review. Retrieved 24 November 2013. 

External links[edit]