Brsjak revolt

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Brsjak Revolt)
Jump to: navigation, search
Brsjak revolt
Part of Ottoman–Serbian Wars
Date 14 October 1880 – 1881
Location Nahiya of Kičevo, Poreče, Bitola and Prilep, Monastir Vilayet, Ottoman Empire
(modern R. Macedonia)
Result Ottoman victory
Belligerents
Local Christians  Ottoman Empire
Commanders and leaders
See list Ottoman Empire

The Brsjak revolt (Macedonian and Serbian Cyrillic: Брсјачка буна/Brsjačka buna, Bulgarian: Бърсячка буна) broke out on 14 October 1880 in the Poreče region of the Monastir Vilayet, led by rebels who sought the liberation of Macedonia from the Ottoman Empire. They received secret aid from Principality of Serbia, which had earlier been at war with the Ottoman Empire, until Ottoman and Russian diplomatic intervention in 1881. The Ottoman Gendarmerie succeeded in suppressing the rebellion after a year.

Background[edit]

Rebel bands and atrocities[edit]

After the Serbian–Ottoman War (1876–78) and the suppressed Kumanovo Uprising (1878), the Ottomans retaliated against the Serb population in the Ottoman Empire.[1] Because of the terror against the unprotected rayah (lower class, Christians), many left for the mountains, fled across the border into Serbia, from where they raided their home regions in order to revenge the atrocities carried out by the Ottomans.[1]

After the war, the Serbian military government sent armament and aid to rebels in Kosovo and Macedonia.[2] Christian rebel bands were formed all over the region.[2] Many of those bands, privately organized and aided by the government, were established in Serbia and crossed into Ottoman territory.[2] In that way, Micko Krstić formed a rebel band in 1879 in Niš, with the help of Nikola Rašić and the military government in Vranje.[2] Micko's band received weapons and ammunition in Vranje, then crossed the border and came into conflict with the Ottomans in around Kriva Palanka, where many of his fighters were killed.[3] With only one comrade, Micko went to Poreče and joined the band of Stevan Petrović–Porečanin, established in the same year.[3] After Micko's departure from Serbia, Spiro Crne had left Serbia with his band, having no better luck than Micko, the band came into conflict with Ottoman jandarma (gendarmerie) and army on 14 March 1880, near the Gjurište Monastery in Ovče Pole, in which 40 Turks and Albanians were killed, and many of his comrades, forcing him to return to Serbia.[3]

As more of these rebel bands from Serbia appeared, in that way also the Ottoman government, and privately organized Turks and Albanians, became more active.[3] Turk and Albanian bands were present on all main passages from the Serbian border to the Vardar river.[3] These bands were also harassing in regions on the right side of the Vardar, and the number of atrocities grew.[3] As a result of this pressure on the right side of the Vardar, Christians organized an uprising.[3]

After Congress of Berlin (June–July 1878), which left Macedonia under the rule of Ottoman Empire and the failure of the Kresna-Razlog Uprising (1878–79), Bulgarians and other Christians in Western Macedonia continued to seek ways to alleviate their situation, especially considering the atrocities by local Muslims and Muslim refugees from Serbia, Bulgaria and Bosnia and Herzegovina. From September 1880 the activity of the so-called "Revenge bands" composed of Christians was enhanced.[4] The British consul in Thessaloniki J. E. Blunt wrote on September 21, 1880 that Bulgarian Secret agents and еmissaries worked "fostering a spirit of rebellion" and have organized in the regions of Prilep and Veles "corps of Avengers" against the Muslims, generally picking out Beys and Landowners for victims.[5]

1880 appeal to Serbia[edit]

In the beginning of 1880, some 65 rebel leaders (glavari), from almost all provinces in southern Old Serbia and Macedonia, sent an appeal to M. S. Milojević, the former commander of volunteers in the Serbian-Ottoman War (1876–78), asking him to, with requesting from the Serbian government, prepare 1,000 rifles and ammunition for them, and that Milojević be appointed the commander of the rebels and that they be allowed to cross the border and start the rebellion.[3] The leaders were among the most influential in the districts of Kumanovo, Kriva Palanka, Kočani, Štip, Veles, Prilep, Bitola, Ohrid, Kičevo and Skopje.[6] The appeal was signed by Spiro Crne, Mihajlo Čakre, Dime Ristić-Šiće, Mladen Stojanović "Čakr-paša", Čerkez Ilija, Davče Trajković, and 59 other rebels and former volunteers in the Serbian army.[3] The reply from the Serbian government is unknown; it is possible that it did not reply.[3] From these intentions, only in the Poreče region, an ethnically uniform compact province, a larger result was achieved.[3] In Poreče, whole villages turned on the Ottomans.[7]

Ohrid conspiracy[edit]

The organizer of the Ohrid conspiracy was Bulgarian bishop Nathanael of Ohrid, who was situated in newly created Bulgarian principality at that time and instructed the rebels through correspondence with the revolutionary committee from Ohrid and with some leaders of rebel bands like Iliya Deliya and Angel Tanasov. The preparation for the rebellion in the town of Ohrid was revealed by the authorities in the spring of 1881 and mass arrests began in Ohrid and the surrounding villages.[8][9] The arrests continued in the regions of Prilep, Kichevo, Bitola and Resen.[10] Kuzman Shapkarev wrote that "the gaols in Ohrid and Bitola can't contain numerous Bulgarian peasants from Kichevo, Ohrid and Demirhisar regions." [11]

History[edit]

The movement in Poreče was organized and known under the name Brsjak Revolt (Брсјачка буна), and was since 14 October 1880 organized by rebel leaders Ilija Delija, Rista Kostadinović, Micko Krstić and Anđelko Tanasović.[12] Viewed of as a continuation of the Kumanovo Uprising,[13] it broke out in the nahiya of Kičevo, Poreče, Bitola and Prilep.[14] The movement was active for little more than a year.[12] The rebels used the Serbian flag in battle.[1] After Rista Kostadinović was killed in action, Micko Krstić succeeded in leading his četa (rebel band).[15]

The Ottoman army succeeded to somewhat suppress the rebellion in the winter of 1880–81, and many of the leaders were exiled.[16] Serbia secretly and very carefully aided the Brsjak Revolt, however, by 1881, this was stopped by the intervention of the government,[17] a decision made after the Porte had recriminated at the European courts, forcing the Russian government to engage itself in the Serbian and Bulgarian governments against the aid to rebels.[18]

As part of the intervention, Spiro Crne was forced to leave Serbian territory, thus, in April 1881, he and eight comrades left Vranje where they had up until then received support from the government.[18] On 22 April, Spiro's band came into conflict with a heavy Ottoman pursuit on Kozjak, and was destroyed.[19] Only two people of his band returned alive to Vranje the next day, Davče and Misajlo Prilepčanac.[19]

The uprising was finally suppressed by the Ottoman jandarma (gendarmerie).[18] Micko at first refused to give himself up,[15] and with only three other leaders alive, they submitted on the promise that they would not be killed.[18]

Rebel bands[edit]

Aftermath[edit]

The Brsjak Revolt, and the preceding one in the Kumanovo region, had a Serbian character, planned in the Serbian cause, thus, the unsuccessful outcome resulted in persecution of the Serbs in Macedonia, with an increasing Bulgarization of the region's Christian Slavic populace.[14] Micko was taken to Bitola and imprisoned on 19 February 1882.[18] He was sentenced to 20 years imprisonment.[25]

In epic songs, the leaders are called "mighty Serbs".[1]

Legacy[edit]

Bulgarian historiography[edit]

The events related to the revolt are considered as a part from Ohrid revolutionary conspiracy in Bulgarian historiography and as a part from Bulgarian liberation movement.[26] The Polish Historian A. Giza also considers these revolutionary activities as a part of Bulgarian national liberation movement.[27] The Bulgarian author Kosta Tsarnushanov reveals the relations between revolutionary committees and rebel bands in different parts in Western Macedonia (Ohrid, Prilep, Demir Hisar, Poreče etc.) and also indicates the leadership of bishop Nathanael of Ohrid.[28] The British historian Mercia MacDermott also indicates the relations between Angel voyvoda and Iliya Deliya with leading citizens in Ohrid and Bishop Natanail.[29]

Macedonian historiography[edit]

The historiography in Republic of Macedonia considers the revolt as a part of the liberation struggles of ethnic Macedonians.[30]

Serbian historiography[edit]

Serbian historiography view the rebellion as, first and foremost, a Christian revolt, with some of the leaders described as Serbs.[citation needed]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Jovanović 1937, p. 237.
  2. ^ a b c d Hadži-Vasiljević 1928, p. 8.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Hadži-Vasiljević 1928, p. 9.
  4. ^ Кирил патриарх Български. Българската екзархия в Одринско и Македония след Освободителната война 1877-1878. Том първи, книга първа, София 1969, с. 470, 472. (Bulgarian Patriarch Kirill. Bulgarian Exarchate in Macedonia and Edirne region after the Liberation War of 1877-1878. Vol. 1, book first, Sofia 1969, p. 470, 472.)

    Срещу тия насилия в северозападна Македония са били образувани някои български отмъстителни и отбранителни чети, съставени от местното население. Такива чети имало в Прилепско, Велешко, в Кичевско, Охридско... Генералното консулство още не било достатъчно осведомено за характера и размерите на размирното движение... То съветвало интелигентните български дейци да възпират своите "събратя" от такъв израз на патриотизъм и да работят за повишаване равнището на образованието. Отмъщаващите чети, каквито до септември 1880 г. не е имало, били вредели на македонския въпрос.

  5. ^ Британски дипломатически документи по българския национален въпрос, т. І (1878-1893), София 1993, с. 189, 191 (British diplomatic documents on Bulgarian national question, vol. I (1878-1893), Sofia 1993, p. 189, 191).

    ...in other parts of the interior where the Bulgarian element is strong, there are secret agents and emissaries at work fostering a spirit of rebelion against the Sultan's Government. One of them has been aprehended in the Vilayet of Monastir. At Kiuprulu-Velesa and Perlepe, two districts where the Bulgarian outnumber the Mahommedans in the proportion of two to one, these emissaries have organized corps of "Avengers" who commit wanton acts of assassination in the open day upon the persons of Mahommedans, generally picking out Beys and Landowners for victims.

  6. ^ Georgevitch 1918, pp. 182–183.
  7. ^ Hadži-Vasiljević 1928, pp. 9–10.
  8. ^ MacDermott, Mercia. Freedom or Death The Life of Gotsé Delchev, The Journeyman Press London & West Nyack, 1978, p. 56-57.
  9. ^ Църнушанов, Коста. „Охридското съзаклятие: предшественици, вдъхновители и дейци“, София, Издателство на Националния съвет на Отечествения фронт, 1966, с. 10, 166.(Tsarnushanov, Costa. Ohrid conspiracy: predecessors, inspiration and figures, Sofia, 1966, p. 10, 166.)
  10. ^ Кирил патриарх Български. Българската екзархия в Одринско и Македония след Освободителната война 1877-1878. Том първи, книга първа, София 1969, с. 469-473. (Bulgarian Patriarch Kirill. Bulgarian Exarchate in Macedonia and Edirne region after the Liberation War of 1877-1878. Vol. 1, book first, Sofia 1969, p. 470-471.)

    Солунският и битолскят затвори били пълни със затворници от Охридско, Прилепско, Кичевско, Битолско и Ресенско... По това бе писал и цариградският вестник "Курие д'Ориан". Въз основа на своя информация той съобщавал, че освен охридски първинци, арестувани били и прилепски, обвинени, че участват в революционен комитет

  11. ^ Национално-освободителното движение на македонските и тракийските българи 1878-1944, т. 1, македонски научен институт, София 1994, с. 120. (The national liberation movement of the Macedonian and Thracian Bulgarians 1878-1944, Vol. 1, Macedonian Scientific Institute, Sofia 1994, p. 120.)

    Охридските и битолските темници не побират многобройните селяни българи от Кичево, Демирхисарско и Охридско окружие

  12. ^ a b c d e f Hadži-Vasiljević 1928, p. 10, Jovanović 1937, p. 237
  13. ^ Trbić 1996, p. 32.
  14. ^ a b Georgevitch 1918, p. 183.
  15. ^ a b Đurić & Mijović 1993, p. 61.
  16. ^ Lazar Koliševski (1962). Aspekti na makedonskoto prašanje (in Macedonian). Kultura. p. 499. 

    Сето ова движење во Западна Македонија е познато во историјата под името „Брсјачка буна". Турската војска успеа во зимата 1880 — 1881 година да ја задуши буната и многу нејзини водачи да ги испрати на заточение.

  17. ^ Матица српска (Matica Srpska) (1992). Zbornik Matice srpske za istoriju, 45–48 (in Serbian). Novi Sad: Матица српска. p. 55. 

    Србија је тајно и врло опрезно помагала акције хришћана у Турској (Брсјачка буна), али је на интервенције владе та помоћ престала ... 1881

  18. ^ a b c d e Hadži-Vasiljević 1928, p. 10.
  19. ^ a b Hadži-Vasiljević 1928, p. 11.
  20. ^ MacDermott, Mercia. Freedom or Death The Life of Gotsé Delchev, The Journeyman Press London & West Nyack, 1978, p. 55.
  21. ^ Църнушанов, Коста. „Охридското съзаклятие: предшественици, вдъхновители и дейци“, София, Издателство на Националния съвет на Отечествения фронт, 1966, с. 122.(Tsarnushanov, Costa. Ohrid conspiracy: predecessors, inspiration and figures, Sofia, 1966, p. 122.)

    В Охридско се беше настанил шипченския борец Илия Делия с цяла чета и обикаляше селата по родната си Илинска планина. Неговият съратник от Шипка Ангел Атанасов от с. Цер, Кичевско, боец от четвърта шипченска дружина...

  22. ^ Историја на македонскиот народ, книга втора, Скопје 1969, с. 104-106.(History of the Macedonian people, vol. 2, Skopje, 1969, p. 104-105

    Почнал да се создава еден заговор кој во историската литература фигурира и како „Брсјачка буна". Заговорот опфатил не само многу села, туку и неколку града од Западна Македонија. Кон крајот на 1878 година еден от раководните доброволци од последната Руско-турска воjна што за своето храбро држање, Диме Чакре од Прилеп, отишол во Крушово со своjот брат и со тамошните првенци почнал да се договара за мерките што требало да се преземат, за да се отстранат засилените турски зулуми... Во 1879 дошло до поврзување на крушевскиот заговорнички кружок со охридскиот кружок... Биле откриени и инициаторите и раководителите на четите браќата Чакревци од Прилеп, кога во април 1881 дошле со дваjца свои четници зада казнат еден сомнителен заговорник од градот. Во борбата со Турците тие ... храбро загинале. Тоа ги снашло и неклку други воjводи. Само воjводата Мицко од Латово ... се предал на Турците...

  23. ^ Бръзицов, Христо Д. (1969). Во Прилепа града: Хроника. 1832-1912. Varna: Държ. изд. p. 128. 

    Тогава остана да се борят за национално и социално освобождение отделни чети, създадени от неутешими българи; да се създаде съзаклятие, което да държи открит македонския въпрос... Тук застана начело Диме Чакрев, обкръжен от брата си Михале (или както му викаха галено Мияйле), от другите братя Тоде и Илия Бъчварови, Георгия Лажо, Стоян Рушан, Илия Кехаята (Кяята), баща и син Радобиловци, Мицко Мариовчето

  24. ^ Прилеп и Прилепско низ историјата, книга прва, Од праисторијата до крајот на првата светска војна, с. 244 (Prilep and Prilep region throughout history, Vol. 1 : From prehistoric times to the end of the First World War, p. 244)

    Прилепчанецот Диме Чакре, познат со своето учество како доброволец во Руско-турската воjна, а засолнет во Ќустендил, навлегол со своjа чета во Прилепско и се обидел да создаде едно пошироко движење во Македониjа ... од посвесните граѓани на Крушево формирал еден заверенички кружок. Неговата смела инициjатива довела до организирање на една поширока завереничка мрежа од таjни кружоци ...

  25. ^ Đorđe N. Lopičić (2007). Konzularni odnosi Srbije: (1804-1918). Zavod za udžbenike. p. 207. ISBN 978-86-17-34399-4. 
  26. ^ Кирил патриарх Български. Българската екзархия в Одринско и Македония след Освободителната война 1877-1878. Том първи, книга първа, София 1969, с. 469-473. (Bulgarian Patriarch Kirill. Bulgarian Exarchate in Macedonia and Edirne region after the Liberation War of 1877-1878. Vol. 1, book first, Sofia 1969, p. 469-473.)

    17. Разкритото от турските власти през 1881 г. Охридско съзаклятие...(раздел - бел. Simin) В "Constantinople Messenger" била обнародвана дописка от Битоля (4 май 1881), в която се казвало, че в Демир Хисар са се били явили смущения. Там били изпратени войски, арестувани били около 50-тина български селяни и изпратени в Битоля. Арестувани имало и в Охрид и Прилеп... "Месенджер" в дописка от Битоля съобщавал за въстаническо движение и в Кичевска каза... Срещу тия насилия в северозападна Македония са били образувани някои български отмъстителни и отбранителни чети, съставени от местното население. Такива чети имало в Прилепско, Велешко, в Кичевско, Охридско... Капитан Илия от село Илино, Кичевско, бил дошъл през зимата с прокламация на турски и български език.

  27. ^ Гиза, Антони. Балканските държави и Македонския въпрос, Македонски Научен Институт София, 2001 (Giza, Anthony. Balkan countries and the Macedonian question, Macedonian Scientific Institute, Sofia, 2001)

    ... въоръжения протест на българите срещу берлинския диктат ... след потушаване на въстанието конспиративната дейност не е прекратена. В Македония се завръщат множество местни опълченци, освободени от руска служба, които с помощта на по-активните граждани и селяни от западния дял на Македония организират нови тайни комитети. Конспирацията обхваща първоначално Прилеп, Крушево, Кичево, Битоля и Охрид, за да се разпространи в скоро време из цялата страна и особено в планинските райони. Центърът й се намира в Демирхисарската планина, откъдето и произтича името на новото движение. Начело застават двамата братя-опълченци Михаил и Димитър Чакреви от Прилеп, които лично организират първите тайни комитети в Прилеп, Охрид и Крушево. Съзаклятниците събират оръжие и организират малки чети, които действат в планините.

  28. ^ Църнушанов, Коста. „Охридското съзаклятие: предшественици, вдъхновители и дейци“, София, Издателство на Националния съвет на Отечествения фронт, 1966, с. 10, 127-128, 129-132, 150-152, 182.(Tsarnushanov, Costa. Ohrid conspiracy: predecessors, inspiration and figures, Sofia, 1966, p. 10, 127-128, 129-132, 150-152, 182.) E.g.: on page 10 Tsarnushanov quotes the beginning of the indictment by the Ottoman court, that reveals the relation between the captured conspirators in Ohrid and one of the leaders of Brsjak revolt Iliya Deliya (Captain Iliya)

    ...През зимата някой си капитан Илия от с. Илино, Битолска каза, дошъл в Охрид и на едно събрание, състояло се в къщата на Яне Самарджията, прочел прокламация, написана на български и турски език и изпратена от бившия охридски митрополит Натанаил, понастоящем председател на Българския революционен комитет със седалище София. С него въпросният митрополит подканял конспираторите да се договорят със споменатия капитан Илия с цел да се вдигнат на въстание местните българи (les bulgaries de ces contreés)...

  29. ^ MacDermott, Mercia. Freedom or Death The Life of Gotsé Delchev, The Journeyman Press London & West Nyack, 1978, p. 55-56.
  30. ^ Историја на македонскиот народ, книга втора, Скопје 1969, с. 104-106.(History of the Macedonian people, vol. 2, Skopje, 1969, p. 104-106 - The text for the Brsjak revolot is part from the chapter "Национални проjави и ослободителни борби во втората половина на ХІХ век" (National manifestations and liberation struggles in the second half of the nineteenth century)

Sources[edit]