Bruce Seals

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Bruce Seals
Brseals drj.jpg
Bruce Seals puts the block on "Dr. J" Julius Erving.
Personal information
Born (1953-06-18) June 18, 1953 (age 61)
New Orleans, Louisiana
Nationality American
Listed height 6 ft 8 in (2.03 m)
Listed weight 210 lb (95 kg)
Career information
High school Booker T. Washington
(New Orleans, Louisiana)
College Xavier (Louisiana) (1971–1973)
NBA draft 1975 / Round: 2 / Pick: 21st overall
Selected by the Seattle SuperSonics
Pro career 1973–1984
Position Power forward
Career history
19731975 Utah Stars (ABA)
19751978 Seattle SuperSonics
1979–1980 Emerson Varese (Italy)
1981–1982 Reyer Venezia (Italy)
1983–1984 Alpe Bergamo (Italy)
Career ABA and NBA statistics
Points 3,107 (8.9 ppg)
Rebounds 1,463 (4.2 rpg)
Blocks 208 (0.6 bpg)
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

Bruce A. Seals (born (1953-06-18)June 18, 1953) is a retired American basketball player, whose career included stints in both the ABA and the NBA.

Seals was drafted in the first round by the Utah Stars, playing two seasons in the ABA before being drafted into the NBA in the second round by the Seattle SuperSonics in 1975. Seals played three seasons in the NBA.[1]

Seals' career spanned five seasons, two leagues, primarily at the power forward position. Due to a variety of issues, he retired from the NBA in 1978. Seals did a stint in the Italian leagues after leaving the NBA.[2] Today he works with the Boys and Girls Clubs of America, teaching inner city youth the power of the game.

Biography[edit]

Born in New Orleans, Louisiana, Seals attended high school at Booker T. Washington High School in New Orleans.[3] In 1971, Seals was named Louisiana’s Most Valuable High School basketball player.[2]

Collegiate career[edit]

Seals attended Xavier University of Louisiana, where he played basketball.[3]

1973-1974[edit]

Seals was selected by the Utah Stars in the first round of the ABA draft. The Utah Stars had posted the best record in the ABA Western Division in the previous season (55-29 in the 1972-1973 season).

In his first regular season with the Utah Stars, Seals played 78 games, averaging 17.4 minutes per game, with 7.0 points per game. The Utah Stars won the Western Division (51-33).

In the post-season, the Utah Stars defeated the San Diego Conquistadors to win the Western Division semifinals. Thereafter, they beat the Indiana Pacers in the Western Division finals. The Utah Stars lost the championship series, though, to the New York Nets. Seals contributed 89 points in the post-season over 15 games, playing 260 minutes for the Utah Stars.[3] (This generates a statistic of 0.34 points per minute.)

1974-1975[edit]

In his second regular season with the Utah Stars, Seals played only 35 games, averaging 10.6 minutes per game, with 4.0 points per game. He was joined by a strong high school center the Stars drafted, Moses Malone. The Utah Stars finished in fourth place in the Western Division, an upset, with a record of 38-46.

In the post-season, the Utah Stars were defeated in the first round by the Denver Nuggets in a five-game series. While Seals played very little, he produced over a point per minute. He racked up 24 points in the post-season over 3 games, playing 41 minutes for the Utah Stars.[3] (This generates a statistic of 0.59 points per minute.)

1975-1976[edit]

Bruce Seals was drafted by the Seattle SuperSonics in the second round of the 1975 NBA Draft.

Seals played 81 games for the Seattle SuperSonics in the 1975-1976 season. He averaged 30.1 minutes per game, with 11.8 points per game. He contributed a total of 957 points to the Seattle SuperSonics this season.

Seals performed well in the post-season, playing 6 games, racking up 181 minutes on the court, and supplying 78 points for the Seattle SuperSonics.[3] (This generates a statistic of 0.43 points per minute.)

The 1975-1976 season saw the Seattle SuperSonics finishing the season at second-place in the Pacific Division of the Western Conference, with a record of 43-39 (.524) behind the Golden State Warriors who led the division and conference with a record of 59-23 (.720). The SuperSonics’ record placed them in the second place spot across the entire Western Conference, which consisted of nine teams, still only being led by the Golden State Warriors.[4]

Seals finished the season tied for the fourth highest amount of personal fouls in the league, with 314.[3]

1976-1977[edit]

Seals played 81 games for the Seattle SuperSonics in the 1976-1977 season. He averaged 24.4 minutes per game, with 11.0 points per game. He contributed a total of 894 points to the Seattle SuperSonics this season.[3]

The 1976-1977 season saw the Seattle SuperSonics finishing the season near the bottom of the division and conference with a 40-42 record (.488), among eleven teams that comprised the Western Conference.[5]

1977-1978[edit]

Seals played 73 games for the Seattle SuperSonics in the 1977-1978 season. He averaged 18.1 minutes per game, with 7.8 points per game. He contributed a total of 571 points to the Seattle SuperSonics this season.

Seals played very little in the post-season, playing in 9 games, but only racking up 92 minutes on the court. He contributed a total of 27 points for the Seattle SuperSonics in the post-season.[3] (This generates a statistic of 0.29 points per minute.)

The 1977-1978 season saw the Seattle SuperSonics finishing the season fourth in the eleven-team Western Conference, third in the Pacific Division with a record of 47-35 (.573). Seattle managed to win the Western Conference, and led the Washington Bullets before losing the series in the NBA Finals.[6]

While Seattle boasted the third highest ranked defense in the NBA at the close of the season, they also represented the second worst offensive ranking among twenty-two teams.[6]

1978-Present[edit]

Speaking about his experiences, Seals says: “The game was good to me... I saw the world.”[2] After leaving the Seattle SuperSonics, Seals did just that with a stint in the Italian leagues.[2] Years later, Bruce married and had two children.[2] In 1990, Seals and his family moved to Boston. Seals came to the Boys and Girls Clubs of Dorchester as Assistant Athletic Director. One year later, in 1991, Seals assumed the position of Director, which he has held ever since. Today, Seals works for the Boys and Girls Clubs of America, teaching inner city youth that basketball is more powerful than violence.[2]

Along with his responsibilities working with the youth of inner city Boston, and being a family man, Seals has also been supportive of his niece, former NCAA athlete, Joy Hollingsworth.[7] Hollingsworth, a point guard, played women’s basketball for the Division I-A Arizona Wildcats in the Pacific-10 Conference (Pac-10) through the 2006-07 season.[8]

Bruce Seals continues to be involved in basketball as an assistant coach at Emerson College in Boston, MA under head coach Hank Smith since the 1994-95 season.

Statistics[edit]

ABA career[edit]

In his two years with the Utah Stars in the American Basketball Association, Seals played 113 games, averaging 15.3 minutes per game, with 6.1 points per game. He contributed a total of 685 points to the Utah Stars.[1]

In his two years in the post-season, he played 18 games, playing 301 minutes on the court, sinking 113 points for the Utah Stars. This is 16.7 minutes per game and 6.3 points per game in the post-season.[1][3] (This generates a statistic of 0.38 points per minute.)

Notably, Bruce Seals maintains the forty-third highest career blocks count in the American Basketball Association, with 73. What is perhaps more notable is that these 73 blocks occurred over only two years.[1] Additionally, Seals holds the ninety-fifth highest career steals record in the ABA, with 72 steals.[1]

NBA career[edit]

In his three seasons in the NBA, Bruce Seals played in 235 games, averaging 24.4 minutes per game, and averaging 10.3 points. He contributed a total of 2422 points to the Seattle SuperSonics over his three years in the NBA.[1][3]

Notes[edit]