Bruceton, Pennsylvania

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Bruceton, Pennsylvania
Dedication of the Experimental Mine, 1910
Dedication of the Experimental Mine, 1910
Coordinates: 40°18′17″N 79°58′53″W / 40.30472°N 79.98139°W / 40.30472; -79.98139Coordinates: 40°18′17″N 79°58′53″W / 40.30472°N 79.98139°W / 40.30472; -79.98139
CountryUnited States
StatePennsylvania
CountyAllegheny County
Borough/TownshipJefferson Hills, South Park
Elevation
961 ft (293 m)
Time zoneUTC-5 (EST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC-4 (EDT)

Bruceton is an unincorporated suburb of Pittsburgh within Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, United States.[1] It is the home of the Experimental Mine of the U.S. Bureau of Mines, which originally opened in 1910.[2][3] It is also the home of the Pittsburgh Safety and Health Technology Center. The Pittsburgh and West Virginia Railway connected to the B&O Railroad in Bruceton.

History[edit]

For years in the early 1940s the town hosted almost 100 scientists to help develop the Manhattan Project as a laboratory of the National Defense Research Committee including a month-long visit by Linus Pauling.[4][5][6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Bruceton, Pennsylvania". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey.
  2. ^ "About NETL". Retrieved 2008-11-15.
  3. ^ Clements, M.E. (1927). "Uncle Sam's Toy Coal Mine". Popular Science (July): 36.
  4. ^ http://osulibrary.oregonstate.edu/specialcollections/coll/pauling/war/narrative/page28.html
  5. ^ Lillian Hoddeson; Paul W. Henriksen; Roger A. Meade; Catherine L. Westfall (12 February 2004). Critical Assembly: A Technical History of Los Alamos During the Oppenheimer Years, 1943-1945. Cambridge University Press. pp. 166–. ISBN 978-0-521-54117-6.
  6. ^ Peter Galison; Bruce William Hevly (1992). Big Science: The Growth of Large-scale Research. Stanford University Press. pp. 270–. ISBN 978-0-8047-1879-0.