Bruno Labbadia

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Bruno Labbadia
Bruno Labbadia – Tag der Legenden 2016 02.jpg
Labbadia in 2016
Personal information
Date of birth (1966-02-08) 8 February 1966 (age 52)
Place of birth Darmstadt, West Germany
Height 1.78 m (5 ft 10 in)
Playing position Striker
Club information
Current team
VfL Wolfsburg (manager)
Youth career
1972–1976 FSV Schneppenhausen
1977–1983 SV Weiterstadt
1983–1984 Darmstadt 98
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1984–1987 Darmstadt 98 105 (44)
1987–1988 Hamburger SV 41 (11)
1988–1991 1. FC Kaiserslautern 67 (20)
1991–1994 Bayern Munich 82 (28)
1994–1995 1. FC Köln 41 (15)
1995–1998 Werder Bremen 63 (18)
1998–2001 Arminia Bielefeld 98 (50)
2001–2003 Karlsruher SC 60 (18)
Total 557 (204)
National team
1987 West Germany U-21 6 (3)
1992–1995 Germany 2 (0)
Teams managed
2003–2006 Darmstadt 98
2007–2008 SpVgg Greuther Fürth
2008–2009 Bayer Leverkusen
2009–2010 Hamburger SV
2010–2013 VfB Stuttgart
2015–2016 Hamburger SV
2018– VfL Wolfsburg
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only

Bruno Labbadia (pronounced [labbaˈdiːa]; born 8 February 1966) is a German retired footballer of Italian heritage. He currently manages VfL Wolfsburg.

Playing career[edit]

Labbadia with Leverkusen in 2009.

In an illustrious career, Labbadia recorded 103 goals in 328 league games[1] having played for some of Germany's top Bundesliga clubs. He had two caps for the Germany national football team.[2]

Managerial career[edit]

Early career: 2003–08[edit]

Labbadia was hired as the manager of Darmstadt 98 on 8 May 2003.[3] His first match was a 2–1 win against TSG Wörsdorf.[4] In his first season, Darmstadt won promotion to the Regionalliga.[5] Darmstadt started the 2004–05 season with a 2–1 loss to Mainz 05 II.[6] Darmstadt finished the 2004–05 season in fifth place.[7] Darmstadt started the 2005–06 season with a 2–1 win against VfR Aalen.[8] Darmstadt finished the season in fifth place.[9] Labbadia left on 30 June 2006.[10] His final match was a 6–0 against SpVgg Bayreuth.[8]

Labbadia was hired as Greuther Fürth's manager on 19 March 2007.[11] Labbadia officially took over on 1 July 2007 when pre-season officially started.[12] His first match was a 3–1 win against Darmstadt in the German Cup.[13] Greuther Fürth finished the season in sixth place.[14] He left the club on 26 May 2008 when he officially joined Bayer Leverkusen.[15] Labbadia finished with a record of 15 wins, 10 draws, and 11 losses.[16]

Bayer Leverkusen: 2008–09[edit]

Labbadia was hired by Bayer Leverkusen on 26 May 2008.[15] His first match was a 3–2 win against Rot-Weiß Oberhausen in the German Cup.[17] Bayer leverkusen finished the season in ninth place.[18] After the season, Labaddia left Bayer Leverkusen and joined Hamburger SV. His final match was a 1–0 to Werder Bremen in the 2009 German Cup Final.[17] Labbadia finished with a record of 19 wins, seven draws, and 14 losses.[19]

Hamburger SV: 2009–10[edit]

Labaddia took over as Hamburg manager on 5 June 2009.[20] His first match was a 4–0 win against Randers FC in the third qualifying round of the Europa League.[21] Labbadia was dismissed on 26 April 2010, just three days before the Europa League semi-final second-leg tie against Fulham.[22][23][24] His final match was a 5–1 loss to 1899 Hoffenheim.[21] Hamburg were in seventh place when they dismissed Labbadia.[25] Labbadia finished with a record of 22 wins, 16 draws, and 13 losses.[26]

VfB Stuttgart: 2010–13[edit]

On 12 December 2010 Labbadia became the new head coach of VfB Stuttgart.[27] His first match was a 5–1 win against Odense in the Europa League.[28] In his first season with the club, he managed to save the club that was staring relegation in the face after the disastrous reigns of his two predecessors, Christian Gross and Jens Keller, ended in the last quarter of 2010. VfB Stuttgart finished in 12th place in the 2010–11 Bundesliga,[29] and would then qualify for the 2012–13 UEFA Europa League by virtue of its sixth position in the 2011–12 Bundesliga.[30][31]

Stuttgart started the 2012–13 season with a 5–0 win against SV Falkensee-Finkenkrug.[32] On 30 January 2013, Labbadia signed a contract extension with Stuttgart, keeping him at the club until the summer of 2015.[33] VfB Stuttgart lost the 2012–13 DFB-Pokal final to FC Bayern Munich, but qualified for the 2013–14 UEFA Europa League by virtue of the fact that Bayern Munich had also won the 2012–13 Bundesliga title.[34]

In the morning of 26 August 2013, Labbadia was relieved of his duties with immediate effect. His club had lost the opening three Bundesliga matches of the 2013–14 season and was in the second last position in the league table.[35] Prior to his sacking, Stuttgart had lost the first leg of the playoff round of the Europa League.[36] During the press conference held in the afternoon on the same day, club president Bernd Wahler said, "Bruno Labbadia has done good work at VfB over the past three years but we want to provide fresh impetus with this change."[37][38] Labbadia finished with a record of 50 wins, 24 draws, and 45 losses.[39]

Return to Hamburger SV: 2015–16[edit]

Labaddia returned to Hamburger SV for a second spell on 15 April 2015.[40] Labbadia won his first match on 25 April 2015 against FC Augsburg.[41][42] This was Hamburg's first win since February 2015.[41] Hamburg finished the 2014–15 season in the relegation playoff spot.[43] In the first leg of the relegation playoff, on 28 May 2015, Hamburg and Karlsruher SC finished in a 1–1 draw.[44] In the second leg, on 1 June 2015, Hamburg won 2–1 in extra time.[45] Labbadia managed to keep Hamburg in the Bundesliga with a 10th-placed finish in the 2015–16 Bundesliga.[46] However, Hamburg were knocked out of the German Cup in the first round during the 2015–16 season.[47] Labbadia and his two assistants were sacked on 25 September 2016 after Hamburg had dropped into 16th position following their 0–1 Bundesliga defeat to Bayern Munich on the previous day, which was their fourth Bundesliga defeat in a row, having started the 2016–17 Bundesliga campaign with a draw at home to FC Ingolstadt.[48]

VfL Wolfsburg: 2018–present[edit]

On 20 February 2018, Labbadia was hired by VfL Wolfsburg, replacing Martin Schmidt, who had stepped down the day before.[49] His first match was a 1–1 draw against 1. FSV Mainz 05 on 23 February 2018.[50] Wolfsburg finished the 2017–18 season in 16th place, which qualified Wolfsburg for the relegation playoff against Holstein Kiel.[51] Labbadia currently has a record of four wins, three draws, and six losses in 13 matches.[52]

Personal life[edit]

Labbadia is of Italian ancestry.[53] His family roots go to Lenola, a town in the province of Latina, in Lazio region.[54] Labbadia's parents had immigrated as a Gastarbeiter in the 1950s to Germany and settled in Schneppenhausen near Darmstadt. Labbadia was raised on a farm in Schneppenhausen.[55]

Career statistics[edit]

Club career statistics[edit]

Club performance League Cup Continental Total
Club League Season Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Germany League DFB-Pokal Europe Total
Darmstadt 98 2. Bundesliga 1984–85 32 9 1 0 33 9
1985–86 38 17 1 1 39 18
1986–87 35 18 4 3 39 21
Totals 105 44 6 4 0 0 111 48
Hamburger SV Bundesliga 1987–88 31 11 2 1 4 3 37 15
1988–89 10 0 3 1 13 1
Totals 41 11 5 2 4 3 50 16
1. FC Kaiserslautern 1988–89 17 5 1 0 18 5
1989–90 28 6 6 3 34 9
1990–91 22 9 1 0 0 0 23 9
Totals 67 20 8 3 0 0 75 23
Bayern Munich 1991–92 30 10 1 0 4 1 35 11
1992–93 32 11 2 3 34 14
1993–94 20 7 2 3 1 0 23 10
Totals 82 28 5 6 5 1 92 35
1. FC Köln 1994–95 33 14 5 1 38 15
1995–96 8 1 1 0 9 1
Totals 41 15 6 1 0 0 47 16
Werder Bremen 1995–96 13 4 0 0 0 0 13 4
1996–97 23 8 2 1 25 9
1997–98 27 6 1 1 28 7
Totals 63 18 3 2 0 0 66 20
Arminia Bielefeld 2. Bundesliga 1998–99 33 28 3 1 36 29
Bundesliga 1999–2000 34 11 3 0 37 11
2. Bundesliga 2000–01 31 11 2 1 33 12
Totals 98 50 8 2 0 0 106 52
Karlsruher SC 2001–02 33 6 1 0 34 6
2002–03 27 12 1 1 28 13
Totals 60 18 2 1 0 0 62 19
Career totals 557 204 43 21 9 4 609 229

Managerial record[edit]

As of matches played on 18 August 2018.
Team From To Record
G W D L Win % Ref.
SV Darmstadt 98 1 July 2003[3] 30 June 2006[10] 102 60 16 26 058.82 [5][7][9]
Greuther Fürth 1 July 2007[12] 26 May 2008[15] 36 15 10 11 041.67 [16]
Bayer Leverkusen 26 May 2008[15] 5 June 2009[20] 40 19 7 14 047.50 [19]
Hamburger SV 5 June 2009[20] 26 April 2010[24] 51 22 16 13 043.14 [26]
VfB Stuttgart 13 December 2010[27] 26 August 2013[37] 119 50 24 45 042.02 [39]
Hamburger SV 15 April 2015[40] 25 September 2016[48] 50 16 12 22 032.00 [26]
VfL Wolfsburg 20 February 2018[49] present 14 5 3 6 035.71 [52]
Total 412 187 88 137 045.39

References[edit]

  1. ^ Arnhold, Matthias (1 October 2015). "Bruno Labbadia - Matches and Goals in Bundesliga". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 9 October 2015. 
  2. ^ Arnhold, Matthias (1 October 2015). "Bruno Labbadia - International Appearances". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 9 October 2015. 
  3. ^ a b "Labbadia neuer Coach bei den "Lilien"". kicker (in German). 8 May 2003. Retrieved 1 February 2013. 
  4. ^ "SV Darmstadt 98". kicker.de (in German). kicker. Retrieved 24 February 2017. 
  5. ^ a b "Oberliga Hessen - Spieltag / Tabelle". kicker.de (in German). kicker. Retrieved 24 February 2017. 
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  9. ^ a b "Regionalliga Süd (2000-2008) - Spieltag / Tabelle". kicker.de (in German). kicker. Retrieved 17 March 2017. 
  10. ^ a b "Lettieri übernimmt die "Lilien"". kicker (in German). 3 April 2006. Retrieved 1 February 2013. 
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  12. ^ a b "Timms Abschied steht fest". kicker (in German). 28 March 2007. Retrieved 1 February 2013. 
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  22. ^ "Bruno Labbadia entlassen" (in German). ZDF. 26 April 2010. Archived from the original on 29 April 2010. Retrieved 26 April 2010. 
  23. ^ "Der HSV setzt auf Moniz" (in German). kicker.de. 26 April 2010. Retrieved 26 April 2010. 
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  50. ^ "Muto antwortet Brekalo bei Labbadias Debüt". kicker.de (in German). kicker. Retrieved 12 May 2018. 
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  54. ^ Màzzaro, Tony (24 December 2008). "Prima soddisfazione di Bruno Labbadia col suo nuovo Amburgo" (in Italian). Südwestrundfunk. Retrieved 8 March 2013. 
  55. ^ "Geil aufs Gewinnen" (in German). Der Spiegel. 7 October 1991. Retrieved 9 May 2015. 

External links[edit]