Bruno Råberg

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Bruno Råberg (born July 13, 1954) is a Swedish-born jazz bassist, composer and music professor based in Boston.

Career[edit]

BRUNO RÅBERG is an internationally renowned bass player and composer. Since coming to the US from his native Sweden in 1981, he has made six recordings as a leader, about 30 as a sideman, and has performed numerous world-class artists. Some of the distinguished musicians Råberg has performed/recorded with include Jerry Bergonzi, George Garzone, Sam Rivers, Billy Pierce, Donny McCaslin, Billy Hart, Bob Moses, Mick Goodrick, Ben Monder, Bruce Barth, Jim Black, Matt Wilson, Bob Mintzer, and John Medeski. Tours have taken Råberg throughout Europe, Scandinavia, the United States, Japan, Africa, and Central America, and to jazz festivals such as Pori, Umbria, Monterey, Nancy, Bologna, Graz, Stockholm, Boston, and Cape Town. Råberg is currently leading several constellations of his own: the Lifelines Quartet with Chris Cheek, Ben Monder, and Ted Poor; the Bruno Råberg Nonet featuring Allan Chase, Phil Grenadier, Jeff Galindo, and others; and Ascensio, a quartet with Allan Chase, Phil Grenadier, and Marcello Pellitteri.

Bruno Råberg grew up in the countryside of Sweden. At 20, he was drafted by Swedish trombone virtuoso Eje Thelin. He stayed with Thelin’s group for 4 years and toured throughout Europe and the US, performing at the Monterey Jazz in 1976. During his 20s, Råberg performed and recorded with numerous renowned Swedish and European artists such as Bobo Stenson, Monica Zetterlund, Zpigniew Seifert, Nils Landgren, Lennart Åberg, and Ulf Wakenius. In 1981, Råberg left his performing career in Europe to come to the United States, thanks to a scholarship to the New England Conservatory in Boston. There he studied with Miroslav Vitous, Mick Goodrick, George Russell, and Bob Moses. He graduated in 1984 with a bachelor's degree in Jazz Studies with Distinction in Performance.

As an educator, Bruno Råberg stands out. He has been a professor at Berklee College of Music in Boston since 1986 and has traveled to Poland, Czech Republic, Italy, Mexico, and Costa Rica as a clinician/performer for Berklee.

Bruno Råberg Selected Discography As a leader

"Hot Box" with Allan Chase, Phil Grenadier, Austin McMahon (OrbisMusic 2015) "Plunge" duo with Phil Grenadier (OrbisMusic2012) “Lifelines” with Chris Cheek, Ben Monder, Matt Wilson (OrbisMusic2008) “Chrysalis” with Donny McCaslin, Mick Goodrick (OrbisMusic 2004) “Ascensio” with Allan Chase, Phil Grenadier (OrbisMusic 1999) “Orbis” with Tim Ray, Bob Moses (OrbisMusic 1998) “Pentimento” with Donny McCaslin, Dan Reiser (BostonSkyline1992)

As a sideman

“Fine Whines” Brooke Sofferman, Jerry Bergonzi (Summit 2008)

Råberg has been teaching at Berklee College of Music in Boston as a professor since 1986.[1]

Råberg's 2008 release Lifelines has received numerous reviews from jazz critics. Bill Milkowski in Jazz Times describes the album, "For sheer output alone, it’s astounding. And the depth of expression and degree of surprise represented here is remarkable."[2]

Bands[edit]

The Lifelines Quartet Bruno Råberg (bass), Chris Cheek (saxophone), Ben Monder (guitar), and Ted Poor (drums)[1]

Bruno Råberg Nonet Bruno Råberg (bass), Allan Chase (saxophone), Mick Goodrick (guitar) Phil Grenadier (trumpet), Jeff Galindo (trombone), and others [1]

Ascensio Bruno Råberg (bass), Allan Chase (saxophone), Phil Grenadier (trumpet), and Marcello Pellitteri (drums) [1]

Discography[edit]

Pentimento (1992, Boston Skyline)
Orbis (1998, Orbis Music)
Presence (1999, Orbis Music)
Ascensio (2003, Orbis Music)
Chrysalis (2004, Orbis Music)
Lifelines (2008, Orbis Music)
"Plunge" (2012, Orbis Music)
Hot Box (2015, Orbis Music)

External links[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d All About Jazz Musician Profile Archived September 30, 2008, at the Wayback Machine.
  2. ^ Milkowski, Bill. "Undertones Archived September 10, 2011, at the Wayback Machine.". JazzTimes, November 2008, p.107