Brutus cluster

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Brutus is the central high-performance cluster of ETH Zurich. It was introduced to the public in May 2008. A new computing cluster called EULER has been announced and opened to the public in May 2014.[1]

Processors[edit]

Brutus is a heterogeneous system containing 11 different kinds of compute nodes:

Standard nodes
  • 120 nodes with four 12-core AMD Opteron 6174 CPUs and 64 GB of RAM (5760 cores)
  • 24 nodes with two 12-core AMD Opteron 6174 CPUs and 32 GB of RAM (576 cores)
  • 410 nodes with four quad-core AMD Opteron 8380 CPUs and 32 GB of RAM (6560 cores)
  • 80 nodes with four quad-core AMD Opteron 8384 CPUs and 32 GB of RAM (1280 cores)
Large-memory (fat) nodes
  • 6 nodes with four 8-core Intel Xeon E7-8837 CPUs and 1024 GB of RAM (192 cores) NEW!
  • 80 nodes with four 12-core AMD Opteron 6174 CPUs and 256 GB of RAM (3840 cores)
  • 10 nodes with four quad-core AMD Opteron 8380 CPUs and 128 GB of RAM (160 cores)
GPU nodes
  • 18 nodes with two 12-core AMD Opteron 6174 CPUs, 32 GB of RAM and 2 Nvidia Fermi C2050 GPUs (432 cores + 36 GPUs)
  • 2 nodes with two 6-core AMD Opteron 2435 CPUs, 32 GB of RAM and 6 Nvidia Tesla C1060 GPUs (24 cores + 12 GPUs)
  • 2 nodes with two 6-core AMD Opteron 2435 CPUs, 32 GB of RAM and various Nvidia and AMD GPUs (24 cores + 2 GPUs)
Legacy nodes
  • 256 nodes with two dual-core AMD Opteron 2220 CPUs and 16 GB of RAM (1024 cores)

In total Brutus contains 19,872 cores, plus a few hundreds in the cluster's file servers, login nodes and management nodes.

The peak performance of Brutus is slightly over 200 teraflops (200 × 1012 floating-point operations per second).

Networking[edit]

  • All nodes are connected to the cluster's Gigabit Ethernet backbone
  • All nodes (except those with Opteron 2220 CPUs) are connected to a high-speed InfiniBand QDR network

Applications[edit]

Thanks to its heterogeneous nature, Brutus can tackle a wide range of applications:

  • Serial and embarrassingly parallel computations
  • Distributed-memory computations (MPI using MVAPICH2)
  • Shared-memory, multithreaded applications (OpenMP) up to 1024 GB of memory and/or 48 threads
  • Third-party (commercial) applications

Trivia[edit]

  • Brutus was ranked the 88th fastest computer in the world in November 2009 (top500.org). Since then, its peak performance has increased three-fold (from 65 to 200 TF).
  • It was then the most energy efficient general purpose supercomputer in the world (Heise.de)
  • It successor, EULER, was ranked the 255th fastest computer in the world in June 2014 [2]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ https://blogs.ethz.ch/id/2014/05/09/the-new-hpc-cluster-euler-is-ready/
  2. ^ https://blogs.ethz.ch/id/2014/06/26/euler-on-position-255/