Bryan Batt

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Bryan Batt
BryanBattEmmysSept09.jpg
Batt in September 2009
Born (1963-03-01) March 1, 1963 (age 55)
Alma materTulane University
OccupationActor, author
Years active1988–present
Spouse(s)
Tom Cianfichi (m. 2014)

Bryan Batt (born March 1, 1963) is an American actor best known for his role in the AMC series Mad Men as Salvatore Romano, an art director for the Sterling Cooper agency. Primarily a theater actor, he has had a number of starring roles in movies and television as well. His performance in the musical adaptation of Saturday Night Fever earned him one of New York City's more unusual honors, a caricature at Sardi's.[1]

Personal life[edit]

Batt was born in New Orleans, Louisiana, the son of Gayle (Mackenroth), an amateur actress, dancer, and civic activist, and John Batt.[2][3][4] His family founded and ran the Pontchartrain Beach amusement park.[5] He attended and graduated from Isidore Newman School (a preparatory school in New Orleans) and Tulane University, where he was a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon Fraternity.[6]

Batt is openly gay.[7][8] On September 28, 2014, he married his long-time partner Tom Cianfichi, an event planner.[9] Batt and Cianfichi own a home decor and furnishings store, Hazelnut, on Magazine Street in New Orleans.[5] In 2010, Batt published a memoir about his mother entitled She Ain't Heavy, She's My Mother; she died in December 2010.[3][10] In 2011, Clarkson Potter published his second book, Big, Easy, Style, which focuses on interior design and home furnishings.[11]

Works[edit]

Film[edit]

Theater[edit]

  • Broadway
  • Off-Broadway
    • Forbidden Broadway Cleans Up Its Act (OBC Recording, nominated for Drama Desk Outstanding Featured Actor in a Musical)
    • Forbidden Broadway Strikes Back! – Various (Triad Theater, New Original Cast, OBC Recording)
    • Jeffrey – Darius (Minetta Lane,WPA/Christopher Ashley)
    • Too Many Girls – Al (ELT)
    • The Golden Apple – Patroclus (York Theater)
    • Give My Regards to Broadway (Carnegie Hall/David Bell)
    • I Love New York (Rainbow and Stars – Bistro Award, OBC Recording)
  • Los Angeles
    • Jeffrey – Darius ( Westwood Playhouse) LA Drama-Logue Award
  • Regional
    • Evita – Che (Carousel Dinner Theater)
    • Grease – Kenicke (Darien Dinner Theater)
    • Trixie True: Teen Detective – Dick Dickerson (Boston Post Road Stage Co.)
    • Romeo and Juliet – Paris (New Orleans Center Stage)
    • The Lover – John (New Orleans Center Stage)
    • Action – Jeep (New Orleans Center Stage)

Television[edit]

Book[edit]

  • She Ain't Heavy, She's My Mother: A Memoir (Random House, 2010), ISBN 978-0-307-58885-2
  • Big, Easy Style (Clarkson Potter Publishers, 2011), ISBN 978-0-307-59190-6

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Bryan Batt & Kristin Chenoweth Get Hung Up At Sardi's Jan. 20 Archived 2009-02-02 at the Wayback Machine.", Playbill. January 21, 2000.
  2. ^ "Bryan Batt Biography (1963–)". Filmreference.com. Retrieved 2013-12-04.
  3. ^ a b Paula Devlin, "Gayle Batt, civic activist and mother of actor Bryan Batt, dies at 79", Times-Picayune, December 21, 2010.
  4. ^ "Lake Lawn Metairie Funeral Home and Cemeteries | New Orleans, LA". Lakelawn.tributes.com. Retrieved 2013-12-04.
  5. ^ a b Joyce Wadler, "An Actor Really Sells His Material", The New York Times, August 16, 2007.
  6. ^ Sue Strachan, "Persona: Bryan Batt", New Orleans Magazine, January 2009.
  7. ^ "The Leading Men: Going to Batt Archived August 14, 2007, at the Wayback Machine.", Playbill, Wayman Wong. October 3, 2005.
  8. ^ "Saturday Night Fever – Bryan Batt", The Advocate, Andrew Velez. December 7, 1999.
  9. ^ "Mad Men's Bryan Batt Weds Longtime Partner Tom Cianfichi". Us Weekly. October 7, 2014.
  10. ^ Craig Wilson, "Q&A: 'Mad Men' star Bryan Batt and his tribute to mom Gayle", USA Today, May 6, 2010.
  11. ^ Needles, Tim. "We talk with Mad Men's Bryan Batt". Short and Sweet NYC. Retrieved 25 January 2012.

External links[edit]