Bryce Bennett

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Bryce Bennett
Rep. Bryce Bennett.jpg
Member of the Montana Senate
from the 50th district
In office
January 7, 2019 – August 2, 2021
Preceded byTom Facey
Succeeded byTom Steenberg
Member of the Montana House of Representatives
In office
January 5, 2015 – January 7, 2019
Preceded byDavid Moore
Succeeded byConnie Keogh
Constituency91st District
In office
January 3, 2011 – January 5, 2015
Preceded byRobin Hamilton
Succeeded byDavid Moore
Constituency92nd District
Personal details
Born (1984-11-11) November 11, 1984 (age 37)
Billings, Montana, U.S.
Political partyDemocratic
EducationUniversity of Montana (BA)
WebsiteCampaign website

Bryce Bennett, (born November 11, 1984) an American politician from Montana. As a Democrat, he served in the Montana Senate from 2019 to 2021 and represented he 50th senate district based in Missoula, Montana. He previously served in the Montana House of Representatives from 2011 to 2019.

Early life and education[edit]

Born in Billings, Montana, Bennett is a fifth-generation Montanan. At a young age, his family moved to Hysham, Montana, then, when Bennett was aged eight, to the Missoula Valley. He attended Lolo Elementary and Big Sky High School, before enrolling at the University of Montana.[1][self-published source]

Political career[edit]

After graduating in 2007, Bennett went to work for the Democratic National Committee in western Montana. Following the 2008 election, Bennett moved to Helena, Montana, and worked for the Montana House Democrats.[1][self-published source]

When Rep. Robin Hamilton announced that he would not be seeking re-election in 2010, Bennett declared his candidacy for the seat. In the 2010 Democratic Primary Election, Bennett won 85% of the vote, defeating his opponent by more than five-to-one.[2] In the general election held on November 2, Bennett won narrowly: he took 50.4% of the vote while the Republican nominee won 46.9% and the Libertarian 2.7%.[3] He took office in January 2011.

Bryce founded the Montana Privacy Caucus by bringing together Republicans and Democrats in the legislature to combat the overreach of government and corporations into our personal lives. Together, the caucus has passed a series of bills which protect Montanans’ private data.[citation needed]

Bennett served as a Minority Caucus Chair in the 2013-2014 session and Minority Whip of the House during the 2015-2016 session.[4]

The Montana Ambassadors named Bennett ‘Legislator of the Year’ for his work to combat dark money.[citation needed]

2020 Race for Secretary of State[edit]

In the 2020 Montana elections, Bennett ran for Secretary of State of Montana. Bennett was uncontested in the Democratic Primary. Christi Jacobsen defeated Bennett, 59.56% to 40.44%.[5]

Personal life[edit]

Bennett is openly gay.[6] He is the first openly gay man to serve in the Montana legislature.[7] His 2010 campaign won the support of the Gay & Lesbian Victory Fund.

Bryce was named by The Advocate (LGBT magazine) as one of their ‘40 under 40’. He was also named to Out (magazine) ‘Power List’ which included “exemplary individuals [who] manage to influence the way others live — either through their public personas, politics, or wealth — and affect cultural and social attitudes.”[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Bennett for House: About Bryce Bennett" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-07-07.
  2. ^ "Montana Secretary of State: 2010 primary election results". Archived from the original on 2012-07-08. Retrieved 2011-02-13.
  3. ^ "Montana Secretary of State: 2010 general election results". Archived from the original on 2012-07-08. Retrieved 2011-02-13.
  4. ^ "Montana Legislature: 64th Session". leg.mt.gov. Archived from the original on 2016-08-30. Retrieved 2016-09-05.
  5. ^ "Jacobsen wins race for secretary of state". 4 November 2020.
  6. ^ "Openly Gay Bryce Bennett runs for Montana office". Seattle Gay News. April 30, 2010. Archived from the original on September 27, 2011.
  7. ^ "Openly LGBT Appointed and Elected Officials". Archived from the original on 2007-07-08.

External links[edit]