Bryndza

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Bryndza
Chleb z bryndza.jpg
Country of originRomania, Slovakia, Poland, Ukraine
RegionCentral and Eastern Europe[1]
Source of milkSheep
PasteurizedNo
TextureDepends on variety
Fat contentDepends on variety
CertificationBryndza Podhalańska: PDO[2]
Slovenská bryndza: PGI[3]
Related media on Wikimedia Commons

Bryndza (from Romanian brânză – cheese) is a Slovak sheep milk cheese made mainly in Slovakia, but also in Romania, Moldova, Poland, Russia, Ukraine, Serbia, Hungary and part of Moravia (Moravian Wallachia) in Czech Republic.[1] Bryndza cheese is creamy white in appearance, known for its characteristic strong smell and taste. The cheese is white, tangy, crumbly and slightly moist. It has characteristic odor and flavor with a notable taste of butyric acid. The overall flavor sensation begins slightly mild, then goes strong and finally fades to a salty finish. Recipes differ slightly across countries.

In Slovakia, bryndza serves as the main ingredient to bryndzové halušky, which is regarded a national dish.

Etymology[edit]

Bryndza or Brynza, a word borrowed from Romanian brânză ("cheese"), is used in various countries throughout Ukraine and the EU,[4] due to its introduction by migrating Vlachs. Though the word brânză (Romanian pronunciation: [ˈbrɨnzə]) is simply the generic word for "cheese" in Romanian,[5] there is no special type of cheese associated with it (the name of the animal is added to differentiate Brânză de vaci (cow cheese)). It is a word presumably inherited by the Romanian language from Dacian,[6][7] the language of the pre-Roman population in modern-day Romania. Alternatively it was possibly borrowed from Albanian brëndës (“intestines”). Originally referred to cheeses prepared in a sheep's stomach by reacting with the rennet inside.[8] Outside Slovakia and the flanking regions of Southern Poland, it is still popular nowadays in the Czech Republic under the Czech spelling "brynza". According to the Romanian Explanatory Dictionary the etymology of ”brânză” is unknown.[9]

It is known as juhtúró in Hungarian, брынза in Russian, brenca in Serbian, Brimsen in German, and ברינזע in Yiddish.[10]

History[edit]

The word was first recorded as brençe, described as "Vlach cheese", in the Croatian port of Dubrovnik in 1370. Bryndza was first recorded in the Kingdom of Hungary in 1470 and in the adjacent Polish Podhale in 1527.[11] In Slovakia, bryndza is regarded as a typically Slovak product and it is one of the main ingredients in the national dish bryndzové halušky. The modern version of the soft spreadable bryndza is believed to have been developed by entrepreneurs from Stará Turá (Western Slovakia) toward the end of the 18th century.[12] They founded bryndza manufactures in mountainous regions of Central and Northern Slovakia, where local sheep cheese manufacturing had deep roots. They traded bryndza and popularized it all around the Austrian Habsburg Monarchy. In Austria, it was called Liptauer, after the northern Slovak Liptov region. The Viennese speciality Liptauer, a savoury cheese-based spread, has replaced bryndza with common cows' milk cottage cheese because the original Slovak bryndza disappeared from Austrian market after the Dissolution of Austria-Hungary.

Geographical indications[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Cheese Description: Bryndza". Cheese.com. Retrieved 2008-06-11.
  2. ^ a b European Commission (2007-06-11). "Commission Regulation (EC) No 642/2007 of 11 June 2007 registering a name in the Register of protected designations of origin and protected geographical indications Bryndza Podhalańska (PDO)". Retrieved 2008-06-10.
  3. ^ a b European Commission (2008-07-16). "Commission Regulation (EC) No 676/2008 of 16 July 2008 registering certain names in the Register of protected designations of origin and protected geographical indications". Retrieved 2008-07-23.
  4. ^ Vasmer, Max; Oleg Trubachyov (1996). "бры́нза". Этимологический словарь русского языка (Etymological dictionary of the Russian language) (in Russian) (3rd ed.). ISBN 5-7684-0023-0. Retrieved 2008-07-22.
  5. ^ "cheese". Dictionar Englez Roman - English Romanian Dictionary Online. Industrial Soft. Archived from the original on 2008-07-08. Retrieved 2008-07-09. brânză
  6. ^ Ion I. Russu, Limba traco-dacilor, Editura Ştiințifică, 1967
  7. ^ Ariton Vraciu, Limba daco-geților, Timişoara: Editura Facla, 1980
  8. ^ ^ Vladimir Orel, Albanian Etymological Dictionary, s.v. "brenda" (Leiden: Brill, 1998), 35.
  9. ^ "Dexonline".
  10. ^ "Rumania, Rumania!". Yiddish Songs and Lyrics.
  11. ^ Votruba, Martin. "Bryndza". Retrieved 2008-12-07.
  12. ^ "Bryndziar Vagač".
  13. ^ European Commission (2007-10-04). "Publication of an application pursuant to Article 6(2) of Council Regulation (EC) No 510/2006 on the protection of geographical indications and designations of origin for agricultural products and foodstuffs (2007/C 232/10)". Retrieved 2010-08-30.
  14. ^ European Commission (2006-09-23). "Publication of an application pursuant to Article 6(2) of Council Regulation (EC) No 510/2006 on the protection of geographical indications and designations of origin for agricultural products and foodstuffs". Retrieved 2008-06-10.

Further reading[edit]