Buñuelo

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Buñuelo
Buñuelos.JPG
Round Colombian buñuelos
Alternative names Bimuelo, birmuelo, bermuelo, burmuelo, bonuelo
Type Doughnut
Place of origin Spain
Cookbook: Buñuelo  Media: Buñuelo

A buñuelo (Spanish: [buˈɲwelo]) (alternatively called bimuelo, birmuelo, bermuelo, burmuelo, or bonuelo; Catalan: bunyol, IPA: [buˈɲɔɫ]) is a fried dough ball. It is a popular snack in Argentina, Bolivia, Colombia, Cuba, El Salvador, Guatemala, Mexico, Nicaragua, Puerto Rico, Ecuador, Uruguay, Spain, Venezuela, Greece, Guam, Turkey, Israel and Morocco, and is a tradition at Christmas, Ramadan, and among Sephardic Jews at Hanukkah. It will usually have a filling or a topping. In Mexican cuisine, it is often served with a syrup made with piloncillo.[1]

Buñuelos are first known to have been consumed among Spain's Morisco population. They typically consist of a simple, wheat-based yeast dough, often flavored with anise, that is thinly rolled, cut or shaped into individual pieces, then fried and finished off with a sweet topping. Buñuelos may be filled with a variety of things, sweet or savory. They can be round in ball shapes or disc shaped. In Latin America, buñuelos are seen as a symbol of good luck.[2]

Regional adaptations[edit]

Home-made Colombian Buñuelos
  • In Colombia they are made with a small curd white cheese and formed into doughy balls then fried golden brown. It is a traditional Christmas dish, served along with natillas and manjar blanco.
  • In Cuba they are traditionally twisted in a figure 8 and covered in an anise caramel. The dough contains cassava and malanga.
  • In the Dominican Republic, buñuelos are rolled into balls from a dough made of cassava (called yuca) and eggs. They are then covered in a cinnamon sugar syrup, often using coconut milk instead of water.
  • In Nicaragua, buñuelos are made from a dough containing cassava, eggs, and white grating cheese. The buñuelos are rolled into balls and deep fried. They are served alongside a syrup made of sugar, water, cinnamon sticks, and cloves. They are eaten year-round, and are a typical side-dish or snack served during holidays.
  • In Puerto Rico, buñuelos are small and round. The dough is often made with milk, baking powder, egg, flour, apio or cassava, or grated corn that has been squeezed through a cheesecloth. They are often filled with cheese, ham, spices, and then baked. Sweet buñuelo dough contains yam or batata filled with guava and cream cheese and usually fried.
  • In Mexico buñuelos are made from a yeasted dough with a hint of anise that is deep-fried, then drenched in a syrup of brown sugar, cinnamon, and guava. Buñuelos are commonly served in Mexico and other Latin American countries with powdered sugar, a cinnamon and sugar topping, or hot sugar cane syrup (piloncillo) and are sold in fairs, carnivals, and Christmas events such as Las Posadas.
  • In Peru, buñuelos resemble picarones in shape (round and ring shaped) but lack yam or squashes as in picarones. Made of flour, water, sugar, and anise, and yeast. They are served with a sweet syrup made of chancaca (sugar cane derived sweet). Common street food native to Arequipa.

There are references to buñuelos in Majorca, Catalonia or Valencia; there are also buñuelos in Turkey, India, Puerto Rico, and Cuba; buñuelos in Russia. Jews in Turkey make buñuelos with matzo meal and eat them during Passover. They are also popular during Hanukkah.[citation needed]

In many Latin American countries, this particular dish can also be made with flour tortillas, and covered in sugar and/or cinnamon.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Grodinsky, Peggy (6 September 2006). "Pump up the flavor with piloncillo". Houston Chronicle. Retrieved 23 January 2014. 
  2. ^ Herrera, Jennifer. "Buñuelos: Tasty dessert symbolic of good luck". San Antonio Express-News. Retrieved 3 March 2015. 

External links[edit]