Buccleuch, Gauteng

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Buccleuch
Buccleuch is located in Gauteng
Buccleuch
Buccleuch
Buccleuch is located in South Africa
Buccleuch
Buccleuch
Buccleuch is located in Africa
Buccleuch
Buccleuch
 Buccleuch shown within Gauteng
Coordinates: 26°03′00″S 28°06′14″E / 26.050°S 28.104°E / -26.050; 28.104Coordinates: 26°03′00″S 28°06′14″E / 26.050°S 28.104°E / -26.050; 28.104
Country South Africa
Province Gauteng
Municipality City of Johannesburg
Main Place Sandton
Established 1938
Area[1]
 • Total 3.83 km2 (1.48 sq mi)
Population (2011)[1]
 • Total 10,465
 • Density 2,700/km2 (7,100/sq mi)
Racial makeup (2011)[1]
 • Black African 47.8%
 • Coloured 4.9%
 • Indian/Asian 26.7%
 • White 18.7%
 • Other 2.0%
First languages (2011)[1]
 • English 61.6%
 • Zulu 8.7%
 • Xhosa 5.3%
 • Afrikaans 4.7%
 • Other 19.7%
Postal code (street) 2090
PO box 2066

Buccleuch is a suburb of Sandton, in the Gauteng province of South Africa.

History[edit]

The suburb of Buccleuch stands on the one of the old Witwatersrand farms called Waterfal. The farmland had the Jukskei River flowing through it and after the creation of the city of Johannesburg the road to Pretoria, later known as the Old Pretoria Road, also passed through.[2] The farm of 7030 acres was purchased by John Alexander Gibson, a British immigrant, who owned a coach transport business. The farm was used as a rest area from his businesses horses and mules.[2]

When those animals were no longer used as transport the farmland was kept until his death in 1928 when it was divided amongst seven heirs and was sold.[2] A son, Frederick Chapman Gibson, kept 1000 acres but would sell the eastern portion to AECI the owners of the Modderfontein Dynamite factory in 1938 and the portion left, surveyed as a township divided into 170 stands of 3 to 5 acres with 50 stands on the Jukskei River selling for ₤475 and up.[2] The suburb itself was named after Frederick's family friend the Duke of Buccleuch and the street names after family and friends.[2] Originally spelt Buccleugh but obtained its current name on 23 September 1992.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Sub Place Buccleuch". Census 2011. 
  2. ^ a b c d e "History of Buccleuch". Buccleuch Steering Committee. Retrieved 16 October 2016. 
  3. ^ Raper, Peter E.; Moller, Lucie A.; du Plessis, Theodorus L. (2014). Dictionary of Southern African Place Names. Jonathan Ball Publishers. p. 1412. ISBN 9781868425501.