Bucculatricidae

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Bucculatricidae
Bucculatricidae.jpg
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Lepidoptera
Family: Bucculatricidae
Genus: Bucculatrix
Zeller, 1839
Diversity[1]
1-3 genera and 297 species
Synonyms
  • Ceroclastis Zeller, 1848

Bucculatricidae or (Bucculatrigidae) is a family of moths. This small family has representatives in all parts of the world. Some authors place the group as a subfamily of the family Lyonetiidae.

Adults of this family are easily overlooked, being very small with narrow wings wrapped around the body at rest. When small, the larvae are leaf-miners, forming distinctive brown blotches on leaves. When larger, they usually feed on the leaves externally. Many species have specific host plants. The pupal cases have distinctive longitudinal ridges, leading to members of the family commonly being called ribbed cocoon makers.

Most authors recognize just a single large genus, Bucculatrix, although two Australian species, Cryphioxena notosema and the scribbly gum moth (Ogmograptis scribula) are sometimes placed in this family rather than in Elachistidae.

Species[edit]

Status unclear[edit]

  • Bucculatrix acerifolia Heinrich, 1937 (described from Germany)
  • Bucculatrix acerifoliae Heinrich, 1937 (described from Switzerland)
  • Bucculatrix auripicta Matsumura, 1931 (described from Japan)
  • Bucculatrix helianthemi (=Dichomeris helianthemi?) (recorded food plant: Helianthemum sessiliflorum)
  • Bucculatrix imitatella Herrich-Schäffer, 1855
  • Bucculatrix turatii Standfuss, 1887 (recorded food plant: Paliurus aculeatus)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Animal biodiversity: An outline of higher-level classification and survey of taxonomic richness - Lepidoptera
  2. ^ Tokár, Zdenko; Laštůvka, Aleš (18 April 2018). "Bucculatrix brunnella sp. n. (Lepidoptera, Bucculatricidae) from Sicily and Sardinia". Nota Lepidopterologica. 41 (1): 113–117. doi:10.3897/nl.41.22840. ISSN 2367-5365. Retrieved 4 June 2018.

External links[edit]