Bud Middaugh

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Bud Middaugh
Sport(s) Baseball
Biographical details
Born c. 1939
Playing career
1958–1961 Miami (OH)
Position(s) Shortstop
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1964–1966 Lorain Admiral King HS (OH)
1967 Miami (OH) (assistant)
1968–1979 Miami (OH)
1980–1989 Michigan
Head coaching record
Overall 824–319–1 (college)
52–14 (high school)

Forest L. "Bud" Middaugh (born c. 1939) is a former American baseball coach. He was the head baseball coach at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio from 1968 to 1979 and at the University of Michigan from 1980 to 1989. He compiled a record of 359-173 at Miami, leading the Redhawks to three Mid-American Conference championships and four appearances in the NCAA playoffs. In 1980, he became the head coach at Michigan. In ten years as the head coach at Michigan, he led the Michigan Wolverines baseball team to a 465–146–1 record, seven Big Ten Conference championships and four appearances in the College World Series.[1] He developed several Major League Baseball players at Michigan, including Barry Larkin, Chris Sabo, Hal Morris, Scott Kamieniecki, and Jim Abbott.[2] Middaugh resigned as Michigan's baseball coach in June 1989 after it was revealed that he had given money collected by selling programs at football games to members of the Michigan baseball team.[3] Middaugh was inducted into the Miami University Hall of Fame in 1981.[4] Middaugh began his coaching career at Lorain Admiral King High School in Lorain, Ohio. In three years at Admiral King, Middaugh compiled a record of 52–14 and coached his team to a Cleveland district championship and a Buckeye Conference championship.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "U of M Baseball". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. 
  2. ^ "Investigation of Michigan Centers on Former Coach Middaugh". Los Angeles Times. February 23, 1990. 
  3. ^ "Wolverines on Probation". Sarasota Herald-Tribune. March 26, 1991. 
  4. ^ a b "1981 Hall of Fame Members". Miami University Redhawks.