Buddhi

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In Hindu mythology, Buddhi is one of the wives of Ganesha.

Buddhi is a Vedic Sanskrit word that means the intellectual faculty and the power to "form and retain concepts, reason, discern, judge, comprehend, understand".[1][2]

Etymology[edit]

Buddhi (Sanskrit: बुद्धि) is derived from the Vedic Sanskrit root Budh (बुध् ), which literally means "to wake, be awake, observe, heed, attend, learn, become aware of, to know, be conscious again".[1] The term appears extensively in Rigveda and other Vedic literature.[1] Buddhi means, states Monier Williams, the power to "form, retain concepts; intelligence, reason, intellect, mind", the intellectual faculty and the ability to "discern, judge, comprehend, understand" something.[1][3]

Buddhi is a feminine Sanskrit noun derived from *budh, to be awake, to understand, to know. The same root is the basis for the more familiar masculine form Buddha and the abstract noun bodhi.

Buddhi contrasts from manas which means "mind", and ahamkara which means "ego, I-sense in egotism".[4][3][2]

Usage[edit]

In Samkhya and yogic philosophy both the mind and the ego are forms in the realm of nature (prakriti) that have emerged into materiality as a function of the three gunas through a misapprehension of purusha (the consciousness-essence of the jivatman). Discriminative in nature (बुद्धि निश्चयात्मिका चित्त-वृत्ति), buddhi is that which is able to discern truth (satya) from falsehood and thereby to make wisdom possible.[citation needed]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Sir Monier Monier-Williams; Ernst Leumann; Carl Cappeller (2002). A Sanskrit-English Dictionary: Etymologically and Philologically Arranged with Special Reference to Cognate Indo-European Languages. Motilal Banarsidass. p. 733. ISBN 978-81-208-3105-6. 
  2. ^ a b Ian Whicher (1998). The Integrity of the Yoga Darsana: A Reconsideration of Classical Yoga. State University of New York Press. pp. 18, 71, 77, 92–95, 219, 231. ISBN 978-0-7914-3815-2. 
  3. ^ a b Jadunath Sinha (2013). Indian Psychology Perception. Routledge. pp. 120–121. ISBN 978-1-136-34605-7. 
  4. ^ Sir Monier Monier-Williams; Ernst Leumann; Carl Cappeller (2002). A Sanskrit-English Dictionary: Etymologically and Philologically Arranged with Special Reference to Cognate Indo-European Languages. Motilal Banarsidass. pp. 124, 783–784. ISBN 978-81-208-3105-6. 

External links[edit]