Buddy Lucas (musician)

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Alonza Westbrook "Buddy" Lucas (16 August 1914 – 18 March 1983),[1] was an American jazz saxophonist and bandleader, who is possibly more famous for his session work on harmonica.[2][3]

As a bandleader, he led bands such as Buddy Lucas & His Band of Tomorrow, the Gone All Stars, and Buddy Lucas & His Shouters, and he also went under the stage name of "Big" Buddy Lucas.[4]

As a session musician, he recorded with Horace Silver,[5] Bernard "Pretty" Purdie, Titus Turner[6] The Rascals, Yusef Lateef,[7] and Aretha Franklin,[8] amongst others.

He was born in Rockville, Alabama, and died in Stamford, Connecticut, aged 68.[1]

Discography[edit]

As leader/co-leader
  • 1952: "Hustlin' Family Blues"/"I'll Never Smile Again" - Buddy Lucas and His Band of Tomorrow
  • 1952: "Drive Daddy Drive" - Little Sylvia Sings with Buddy Lucas and His Band of Tomorrow
  • 1954: "A Million Tears" - Little Sylvia Sings with Buddy Lucas Orchestra
  • 1956: "Blueberry Hill"
  • 1957: "Bo-Lee"/"Star Dust"
  • 1957: "Hound Dog"/"When My Dreamboat Comes Home" - Buddy Lucas with Jimmy Carrol & Orchestra
  • 1957: "Searchin'" Buddy Lucas
  • 1967: Honkin' Sax
As sideman

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Eagle, Bob; LeBlanc, Eric S. (2013). Blues - A Regional Experience. Santa Barbara: Praeger Publishers. p. 89. ISBN 978-0313344237.
  2. ^ Kirchner, Bill (2005) The Oxford Companion to Jazz, p. 666. Oxford University Press At Google Books. Retrieved 2 July 2013.
  3. ^ Jet, p. 64. 11 Jun 1964 Jet. At Google Books. Retrieved 2 July 2013.
  4. ^ Biography allmusic. Retrieved 2 July 2013.
  5. ^ Silver, Horace (2007) Let's Get to the Nitty Gritty: The Autobiography of Horace Silver, p. 24. University of California Press At Google Books. Retrieved 2 July 2013.
  6. ^ Broven, John (2009) Record Makers and Breakers: Voices of the Independent Rock 'n' Roll Pioneers, p. 225. University of Illinois Press At Google Books. Retrieved 2 July 2013.
  7. ^ Lateef, Yusef (2006) The Gentle Giant: The Autobiography of Yusef Lateef, p. 108. Morton Books, Inc. At Google Books. Retrieved 2 July 2013.
  8. ^ Awkward, Michael (2007) Soul Covers: Rhythm and Blues Remakes and the Struggle for Artistic Identity (Aretha Franklin, Al Green, Phoebe Snow), p. 69. Duke University Press At Google Books. Retrieved 2 July 2013.
  9. ^ Bogdanov, Vladimir and Chris Woodstra, Stephen Thomas Erlewine (2002) All Music Guide to Jazz: The Definitive Guide to Jazz Music, p. 1233. Backbeat Books At Google Books. Retrieved 2 July 2013.