Bugs & Daffy: The Wartime Cartoons

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Bugs & Daffy: The Wartime Cartoons
Bugs & Daffy The Wartime Cartoons.jpg
VHS cover
Produced byRalph Tribbey
StarringMel Blanc (voice)
Edited byJohen Bohn
Distributed byMGM/UA Home Video
Release date
March 7, 1989
Running time
90 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish

Bugs & Daffy: The Wartime Cartoons is a 1989 direct-to-video program by MGM/UA Home Video, containing 11 Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies shorts, all of which are centered on World War II. Film critic Leonard Maltin (Entertainment Tonight) tells trivia and facts about each animated short.[1][2][3][4][5]

Features[edit]

# Title Release date Director DVD availability
1 The Weakly Reporter March 25, 1944 Chuck Jones Looney Tunes Golden Collection: Volume 6
2 Draftee Daffy January 27, 1945 Bob Clampett Looney Tunes Golden Collection: Volume 3
3 Super-Rabbit April 3, 1943 Chuck Jones Looney Tunes Golden Collection: Volume 3
4 The Fifth-Column Mouse[p 1] March 6, 1943 Friz Freleng Looney Tunes Golden Collection: Volume 6
5 Falling Hare[p 1] October 30, 1943 Bob Clampett Looney Tunes Golden Collection: Volume 3
6 Daffy – The Commando[p 1] November 20, 1943 Friz Freleng Looney Tunes Golden Collection: Volume 6
7 Swooner Crooner May 6, 1944 Frank Tashlin Looney Tunes Golden Collection: Volume 3
8 Little Red Riding Rabbit January 8, 1944 Friz Freleng Looney Tunes Golden Collection: Volume 2
9 Plane Daffy September 16, 1944 Frank Tashlin Looney Tunes Golden Collection: Volume 4
10 Herr Meets Hare January 13, 1945 Friz Freleng Looney Tunes Golden Collection: Volume 6
11 Russian Rhapsody May 20, 1944 Bob Clampett Looney Tunes Golden Collection: Volume 6

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Public domain in the United States

Voice cast[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Andy Wickstrom (April 15, 1989). "The Wartime Cartoons reflect1940s concerns". The Herald Journal. Retrieved July 21, 2012.
  2. ^ "Daffy, Bugs Bunny and pals take looniness to World War II". The Miami Herald. May 26, 2002. Retrieved July 21, 2012.
  3. ^ Mike Clark (April 21, 1989). "Movies". USA Today. Retrieved July 21, 2012.
  4. ^ Douglas Pratt. The laser video disc companion. New York Zoetrope, 1992. p. 60. ISBN 0918432898.
  5. ^ James M. Craddock. The Video Source Book. Thomson Gale, 2008. p. 425. ISBN 1414400993.

External links[edit]