Bulverhythe railway station

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St Leonards Bulverhythe
Location
Place East Bulverhythe, West St Leonards
Area Hastings, East Sussex
Grid reference TQ784088
Operations
Original company Brighton, Lewes and Hastings Railway
Platforms ?
History
27 June 1846[1][2] Opened
7 November 1846 Closed
Disused railway stations in the United Kingdom
Closed railway stations in Britain
A B C D–F G H–J K–L M–O P–R S T–V W–Z
170433 at Edinburgh Waverley.JPG UK Railways portal
Railway stations in Hastings
Ore
Mount Pleasant tunnel
230 yd
210 m
Hastings
Hastings tunnel
788 yd
721 m
St Leonards Warrior Square
West St Leonards
Bo-peep tunnel
1318 yd
1205 m
St Leonards West Marina
Bulverhythe
Glyne Gap Halt

Bulverhythe (also known as St Leonards Bulverhythe[3]) was a temporary railway station on the Brighton Lewes and Hastings Railway in Bulverhythe, now part of Hastings, East Sussex.[4]

History[edit]

The independent Brighton, Lewes & Hastings Railway was incorporated in 1844 to construct a 32.5 miles (52.3 km) line from Brighton to Bulverhythe, 2.75 miles (4.43 km) from Hastings.[5] A temporary terminus named "Bulverhythe" was opened on 27 June 1846 on a site near the Bull Inn on the modern day A259 Bexhill Road[6] pending the construction of a bridge over the River Asten.[7] The station remained open for just under six months, before the line was extended to a permanent station at St Leonards West Marina in November 1846.[8] The Brighton, Lewes & Hastings Railway was taken over by the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway in 1847.

Preceding station Historical railways Following station
Bexhill   Brighton, Lewes & Hastings Railway
East Coastway Line
  Terminus

Present day[edit]

St Leonards West Marina station closed in 1967 and the only remaining station in the West St Leonards area is West St Leonards.

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.disused-stations.org.uk/s/st.leonards_west_marina/index.shtml
  2. ^ Southern Region Record by R.H.Clark
  3. ^ Course, Edwin (1973). The Railways of Southern England: the Main Lines. London: B.T. Batsford Ltd. p. 299. ISBN 0-7134-0490-6. 
  4. ^ Kent Rail, "Brighton".
  5. ^ White, H.P. (1992). A Regional History of the Railways of Great Britain: Southern England (Vol. 2). Nairn, Scotland: David St John Thomas. p. 84. ISBN 0-946537-77-1. 
  6. ^ Sussex Industrial Archaeology Society, Brighton to Three Bridges, 27 December 2004.
  7. ^ "The Bull Inn". 17 January 2008. Archived from the original on 10 March 2008. Retrieved 2012-06-15. 
  8. ^ Course, E., p. 149.

Coordinates: 50°51′06″N 0°32′02″E / 50.851640°N 0.533769°E / 50.851640; 0.533769