Bunium bulbocastanum

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Bunium bulbocastanum
Scientific classification
Kingdom:
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Order:
Family:
Genus:
Species:
B. bulbocastanum
Binomial name
Bunium bulbocastanum
Synonyms[1]
  • Bulbocastanum balearicum Sennen
  • Bulbocastanum linnaei Schur
  • Bulbocastanum mauritanicum Willk.
  • Bulbocastanum mediterraneum Albert
  • Bunium agrarium Albert
  • Bunium aphyllum Jan ex DC.
  • Bunium bulbosum Dulac
  • Bunium collinum Albert
  • Bunium crassifolium (Batt.) Batt.
  • Bunium elatum (Batt.) Batt.
  • Bunium fontanesii (Pers.) Maire
  • Bunium majus Vill.
  • Bunium mauritanicum (Boiss. & Reut.) Batt.
  • Bunium mediterraneum Albert
  • Bunium minus Gouan
  • Bunium perotii Braun-Blanq. & Maire
  • Carum bulbocastanum (L.) Koch
  • Carum mauritanicum Boiss. & Reut.
  • Carvi bulbocastanum (L.) Bubani
  • Conopodium balearicum (Sennen) M.Hiroe
  • Diaphycarpus incrassatus (Boiss.) Calest.

Bunium bulbocastanum is a plant species in the family Apiaceae. It was once used as a root vegetable in parts of western Europe, and has been called great pignut[2][3] or earthnut.[2]

Growth[edit]

The plant is native to western Europe.[4] It reaches about 60 cm (24 in) tall and 25 cm (9.8 in) wide, bearing frilly leaves and hermaphroditic flowers; it is pollinated by insects and self-fertile.[citation needed]

The small, rounded taproot is edible raw or cooked, and said to taste like sweet chestnuts.[citation needed] The leaf can be used as an herb or garnish similar to parsley.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Plant List: A Working List of All Plant Species".
  2. ^ a b "Bunium bulbocastanum". Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN). Agricultural Research Service (ARS), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  3. ^ "BSBI List 2007". Botanical Society of Britain and Ireland. Archived from the original (xls) on 2014-10-23. Retrieved 2014-10-17.
  4. ^ "Bunium bulbocastanum L.", Plants of the World Online, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, retrieved 2018-06-30

External links[edit]