Bunkering

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A livestock carrier receiving bunkers from a bunker vessel in Fremantle Harbour, Australia
A livestock carrier receiving bunkers from a bunker vessel in Fremantle Harbour, Australia

Bunkering is the supply of fuel for use by ships in a seaport.[1]

The term originated in the days of steamships, when the fuel, coal, was stored in bunkers.[1] Nowadays the term bunker is generally applied to the storage of petroleum products in tanks, and the practice and business of refueling ships. Bunkering operations are located at seaports, and they include the storage of "bunker" (ship) fuels and the provision of the fuel to vessels.[2] Bunkering includes the shipboard logistics of loading fuel and distributing it among available "bunkers" (on-board fuel tanks.)[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Manaadiar, Hariesh. "What is Bunker and Bunkering". Shipping and Feight Resource. Puthan House. Retrieved 27 June 2016. 
  2. ^ "Bunkering". Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore (MPA). Retrieved 16 January 2015. 
  3. ^ MOHIT (19 October 2010). "Bunkering is Dangerous : Procedure for Bunkering Operation on a Ship". Marine Insight. Retrieved 16 January 2015Site seems to require enabling of cookies.