Burlington County, New Jersey

Coordinates: 39°53′N 74°40′W / 39.88°N 74.67°W / 39.88; -74.67
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Burlington County
Breidenhart in Moorestown was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1977.
Flag of Burlington County
Map of New Jersey highlighting Burlington County
Location within the U.S. state of New Jersey
Map of the United States highlighting New Jersey
New Jersey's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 39°53′N 74°40′W / 39.88°N 74.67°W / 39.88; -74.67
Country United States
State New Jersey
FoundedMay 17, 1694
Named forBridlington, England
SeatMount Holly[1]
Largest municipalityEvesham Township (population)
Washington Township (area)
Government
 • Commissioner DirectorFelicia Hopson (D, term ends December 31, 2023)
Area
 • Total820.19 sq mi (2,124.3 km2)
 • Land799.29 sq mi (2,070.2 km2)
 • Water20.89 sq mi (54.1 km2)  2.5%
Population
 • Total461,860
 • Estimate 
(2022)[3][5]
466,103
 • Density560/sq mi (220/km2)
Congressional districts1st, 3rd
Websitewww.co.burlington.nj.us
Map
Interactive map of Burlington County, New Jersey

Burlington County is a county in the South Jersey region of the U.S. state of New Jersey. The county is the largest by land area in New Jersey and ranks second behind neighboring Ocean County in total area.[2] Its county seat is Mount Holly.[1] As of the 2020 census, the county was the state's 11th-most-populous county,[6] with a population of 461,860,[3][4] its highest decennial count ever and an increase of 13,126 (+2.9%) from the 448,734 recorded at the 2010 census,[7] which in turn had reflected an increase of 25,340 (6.0%) from the 423,394 enumerated at the 2000 census.[8] The most populous place in the county was Evesham Township with 46,826 residents as of the 2020 census.[4] Washington Township covered 102.71 square miles (266.0 km2), the largest area of any municipality in the county.[9] The county is part of the South Jersey region of the state.

Burlington County is located east of the Delaware River and borders Philadelphia, the nation's sixth-largest city. It is part of the Philadelphia-Camden-Vineland, PA-NJ-DE-MD combined statistical area, also known as the Delaware Valley.[10] However, the county stretches across the state, and its southeast corner reaches tidal estuaries leading to New Jersey's Great Bay, which separates the county from the Atlantic Ocean.

Etymology[edit]

Anglo-European records of Burlington County date to 1681, when its court was established in the Province of West Jersey. The county was formed on May 17, 1694, "by the union of the first and second Tenths."[11] The county was named for Bridlington, a town in England.[12][13][14]

History[edit]

Burlington County, originally the seat of government for the Province of West Jersey, merged with East Jersey in 1702 to form the Province of New Jersey. At its inception, Burlington County was considerably larger but was subsequently partitioned to form additional counties in response to population growth. Specifically, in 1714, a partition to the north led to the creation of Hunterdon County. Hunterdon County itself was further divided over time, resulting in the formation of three additional counties: Morris, Sussex and Warren.

Initially, the county seat was in Burlington. However, as the population began to increase and spread toward the interior of the province, away from the Delaware River, a more central location became necessary. Consequently, the seat of government was relocated to Mount Holly in 1793.[15]

The period of industrialization saw significant improvements in transportation within Burlington County, which in turn enhanced the profitability of its agricultural sector. Concurrently, a population surge in the coastal communities, fueled by flourishing international trade and ship repair industries, necessitated extensive road improvements throughout the county.[citation needed]

Geography and climate[edit]

Arney's Mount seen from Saylors Pond Road, also known as County Road 670

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, as of the 2020 Census, the county had a total area of 820.19 square miles (2,124.3 km2), of which 799.29 square miles (2,070.2 km2) was land (97.5%) and 20.89 square miles (54.1 km2) was water (2.5%).[2]

Most of the county's land is coastal and alluvial plain, with little topographic relief. There are a few anomalous hills, such as Apple Pie Hill and Arney's Mount, the highest of the county and among the highest in South Jersey at approximately 240 feet (73 m) above sea level.[16] The low point is sea level along the Delaware and Mullica rivers.

Most of the land is dotted with rivers, streams, and wetlands. Some of the largest and most important rivers in Burlington County include Rancocas Creek, Assiscunk Creek, Pennsauken Creek, Mullica River, Batsto River, and Wading River.

Climate chart (explanation)
JFMAMJJASOND
 
 
3.5
 
 
41
22
 
 
2.9
 
 
45
24
 
 
4.4
 
 
53
31
 
 
4
 
 
64
40
 
 
4
 
 
74
49
 
 
4
 
 
82
59
 
 
4.4
 
 
87
64
 
 
4.9
 
 
85
62
 
 
4.1
 
 
78
54
 
 
3.8
 
 
67
43
 
 
3.7
 
 
57
35
 
 
4
 
 
45
27

Average max. and min. temperatures in °F

Precipitation totals in inches

Source: The Weather Channel[17]

Metric conversion
JFMAMJJASOND
 
 
89
 
 
5
−6
 
 
74
 
 
7
−4
 
 
112
 
 
12
−1
 
 
102
 
 
18
4
 
 
102
 
 
23
9
 
 
101
 
 
28
15
 
 
112
 
 
31
18
 
 
124
 
 
29
17
 
 
104
 
 
26
12
 
 
97
 
 
19
6
 
 
93
 
 
14
2
 
 
102
 
 
7
−3

Average max. and min. temperatures in °C

Precipitation totals in mm

Average temperatures in the county seat of Mount Holly have ranged from a low of 22 °F (−6 °C) in January to a high of 87 °F (31 °C) in July, although a record low of −25 °F (−32 °C) was recorded in February 1934 and a record high of 104 °F (40 °C) was recorded in July 1936. Average monthly precipitation ranged from 2.92 inches (74 mm) in February to 4.87 inches (124 mm) in August. According to the Köppen climate classification, Burlington County has a humid subtropical climate (Cfa), with relatively cool to cold winters and hot summers.

Severe weather is common in the warm months. Hurricanes have struck Burlington County on occasion, but tornadoes are uncommon. Severe thunderstorms, however, are common during the warm season. Snowfall is typical in the winter, with the snowfall averages in the county ranging from about 18 to 22 inches. The nearby Atlantic Ocean moderates Burlington County's climate, and rain is common year-round. The county seat receives about 41 inches of rain per year.

Another weather phenomenon that occurs in Burlington County is radiative cooling in the Pine Barrens, a large pine forest and reserve that takes up a good portion of Southern and Eastern Burlington County. Due to sandy soil, on clear and dry nights these areas might be 10 to 15 °F (−12 to −9 °C) colder than the surrounding areas, and there is a shorter frost-free season in these places. The sandy soil of the Pinelands loses heat much faster than the other soils or urban surfaces (concrete, asphalt) in the region, and so achieves a much lower temperature at night than the rest of the county. This effect is far less pronounced on moist, cloudy, or windy nights, as these three factors greatly reduce the radiative cooling of the sandy soil.[17]

Climate data for {{{location}}}
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 72
(22)
74
(23)
90
(32)
96
(36)
98
(37)
98
(37)
103
(39)
102
(39)
95
(35)
87
(31)
78
(26)
73
(23)
103
(39)
Mean maximum °F (°C) 63
(17)
62
(17)
74
(23)
87
(31)
89
(32)
94
(34)
96
(36)
94
(34)
89
(32)
80
(27)
73
(23)
64
(18)
98
(37)
Mean daily maximum °F (°C) 40
(4)
43.5
(6.4)
52
(11)
63
(17)
73
(23)
81.8
(27.7)
86.5
(30.3)
84.1
(28.9)
77.1
(25.1)
66
(19)
55.5
(13.1)
44.2
(6.8)
63.9
(17.7)
Daily mean °F (°C) 32
(0)
34.6
(1.4)
42.5
(5.8)
52.3
(11.3)
61.8
(16.6)
71
(22)
75.8
(24.3)
73.6
(23.1)
66.1
(18.9)
55.1
(12.8)
46
(8)
36
(2)
53.9
(12.2)
Mean daily minimum °F (°C) 24
(−4)
25.7
(−3.5)
32.9
(0.5)
41.6
(5.3)
50.6
(10.3)
60.1
(15.6)
65.2
(18.4)
63
(17)
55.1
(12.8)
44.3
(6.8)
36.5
(2.5)
27.7
(−2.4)
43.9
(6.6)
Mean minimum °F (°C) 7
(−14)
9
(−13)
17
(−8)
28
(−2)
37
(3)
48
(9)
56
(13)
54
(12)
44
(7)
31
(−1)
22
(−6)
14
(−10)
5
(−15)
Record low °F (°C) −6
(−21)
−3
(−19)
3
(−16)
23
(−5)
32
(0)
43
(6)
50
(10)
51
(11)
37
(3)
26
(−3)
17
(−8)
2
(−17)
−6
(−21)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 2.89
(73)
2.78
(71)
4.42
(112)
3.70
(94)
4.07
(103)
4.46
(113)
4.78
(121)
4.68
(119)
4.02
(102)
3.26
(83)
3.42
(87)
3.73
(95)
46.21
(1,174)
Average precipitation days 10 11 11 12 12 11 11 11 8 11 9 12 125
Average snowy days 4 5 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 15
Source 1: [18]
Source 2: [19]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
CensusPop.Note
179018,095
180021,52118.9%
181024,97916.1%
182028,82215.4%
183031,1077.9%
184032,8315.5%
185043,20331.6%
186049,73015.1%
187053,6397.9%
188055,4023.3%
189058,5285.6%
190058,241*−0.5%
191066,56514.3%
192081,77022.8%
193093,54114.4%
194097,0133.7%
1950135,91040.1%
1960224,49965.2%
1970323,13243.9%
1980362,54212.2%
1990395,0669.0%
2000423,3947.2%
2010448,7346.0%
2020461,8602.9%
2022 (est.)466,103[3][5]0.9%
Historical sources: 1790-1990[20]
1970-2010[9] 2010[7] 2020[3][4]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[11]

2020 census[edit]

As of the 2020 U.S. census, the county had 461,860 people, 170,074 households, and 170,074 families. The population density was 578 inhabitants per square mile (223.2/km2). There were 184,775 housing units at an average density of 231.25 per square mile (89.3/km2). The county's racial makeup was 65.6% White, 16.8% African American, 0.25% Native American, 5.68% Asian, and 8.08% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 8.74% of the population.[3]

There were 170,074 households, of which 31.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.02% were married couples living together, 26.8% had a female householder with no husband present, 14.6% had a male householder with no wife present and 29.4% were non-families. 30.67% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.55 and the average family size was 3.08.[3]

About 21.1% of the county's population was under age 18, 8.3% was from age 18 to 24, 37.1% was from age 15 to 44, and 17.4% was age 65 or older. The median age was 41.4 years. The gender makeup of the county was 49.23% male and 50.76% female. For every 100 females, there were 97.0 males.[3]

The county's median household income was $88,797, and the median family income was $105,488. About 5.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.5% of those under age 18 and 4.5% of those age 65 or over.[3][21]

2010 census[edit]

The 2010 U.S. census counted 448,734 people, 166,318 households, and 117,254 families in the county. The population density was 561.9 inhabitants per square mile (217.0/km2). There were 175,615 housing units at an average density of 219.9 per square mile (84.9/km2). The racial makeup was 73.84% (331,342) White, 16.60% (74,505) Black or African American, 0.22% (985) Native American, 4.32% (19,395) Asian, 0.05% (219) Pacific Islander, 2.05% (9,193) from other races, and 2.92% (13,095) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.42% (28,831) of the population.[7]

Of the 166,318 households, 31.3% had children under the age of 18; 54.3% were married couples living together; 12% had a female householder with no husband present and 29.5% were non-families. Of all households, 24.4% were made up of individuals and 9.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.62 and the average family size was 3.14.[7]

23.2% of the population were under the age of 18, 8.3% from 18 to 24, 25.4% from 25 to 44, 29.2% from 45 to 64, and 13.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40.4 years. For every 100 females, the population had 96.6 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 94.6 males.[7]

Economy[edit]

The Bureau of Economic Analysis calculated that the county's gross domestic product was $27.4 billion in 2021, which was ranked 10th in the state and was a 5.9% increase from the prior year.[22]

In 2015, the county had a per capita personal income of $55,227, the tenth-highest in New Jersey and ranked 228th of 3,113 counties in the United States.[23][24] The Bureau of Economic Analysis ranked the county as having the 158th-highest per capita income of all 3,113 counties in the United States (and the 11th-highest in New Jersey) as of 2009.[25]

Government[edit]

County government[edit]

Burlington County is governed by a board of county commissioners comprised of five members elected at-large by the voters in partisan elections that serve staggered three-year terms, with one or two seats up for election each year in a three-year cycle. Burlington County Board of County Commissioners have both administrative and policy-making powers. Each Burlington County Commissioner oversees a particular area of service: Administration & Natural Resources; Education & Justice; Public Works & Veteran Services; Public Safety & Health and Human Services; and Hospital and Medical Services & Elections.[26] In 2016, commissioners were paid $10,553 and the commissioner director was paid an annual salary of $11,553; the commissioner salaries are the lowest of the state's 21 counties.[27]

As of 2024, Burlington County's Commissioners are (terms for Director and Deputy Director end every December 31st):[26][28][29][30][31]

Commissioner Party, Residence, Term
Director Felicia Hopson D, Willingboro Township, 2024[32]
Deputy Director Daniel J. O'Connell D, Delran Township, 2024[33]
Allison Eckel D, Medford, 2025[34]
Tom Pullion D, Edgewater Park, 2026[35]
Balvir Singh D, Burlington Township, 2026[36]

Pursuant to Article VII Section II of the New Jersey State Constitution, each county in New Jersey is required to have three elected administrative officials known as "constitutional officers." These officers are the County Clerk and County Surrogate (both elected for five-year terms of office) and the County Sheriff (elected for a three-year term).[37] Burlington County's Constitutional Officers are:

Title Representative
County Clerk Joanne Schwartz (D, Southampton Township, 2028)[38][39]
Sheriff James H. Kostoplis (D, Bordentown, 2025)[40][41]
Surrogate Brian J. Carlin (D, Burlington Township, 2026)[42][43]

The Burlington County Prosecutor is LaChia L. Bradshaw of the Columbus section of Mansfield Township who was nominated by Governor of New Jersey Phil Murphy and sworn into office in July 2022 after confirmation by the New Jersey Senate.[44][45] Burlington County constitutes Vicinage 3 of the New Jersey Superior Court and is seated at the Burlington County Courts Facility and County Office Building in Mount Holly, with additional space in the Olde Courthouse and Rancocas Building, also in Mount Holly; the Assignment Judge for Vicinage 3 is Ronald E. Bookbinder.[46]

In the 2012 general election, Democrats Aimee Belgard and Joanne Schwartz won the election as Freeholders (now Commissioners) over Republican incumbents Bruce Garganio and Mary Ann O'Brien, despite being outspent by a six-to-one margin.[47] However, in 2014, both Garganio and O'Brien were successful in winning back seats on the Freeholder board, while Aimee Belgard lost her bid for U.S. Congress, losing the popular vote in both Ocean and Burlington counties.[48][49] In 2015, Republican newcomers Kate Gibbs and Ryan Peters ousted Belgard and Schwartz, again giving the Republican Party full control on the Freeholder Board.[50] In 2017, Democratic newcomers Tom Pullion and Balvir Singh defeated Republican incumbents Bruce Garganio and Linda Hughes, winning the county election for Democrats for the first time in a non-presidential election year in decades.[51] [52]

In 2018, Democrat Joanne Schwartz defeated Republican incumbent Tim Tyler in the County Clerk election. In the freeholder elections, Democrats Felicia Hopson and George Youngkin defeated Republican incumbents Kate Gibbs and Linda Hughes. This gave Democrats a 4-1 majority, gaining control of the Freeholder Board for the first time since 1975. George Youngkin won despite having suspended his campaign due to a past domestic violence charge that was later dropped. He resigned on January 2, the day after being sworn in. Democrats appointed Daniel J. O’Connell to replace him, until a special election could be held on November 5, 2019.[53][54] In 2019, Democrat Anthony Basantis defeated Republican Michael Ditzel in the Sheriff election, replacing retired Republican Sheriff Jean Stanfield, who was elected to the State Assembly. In the regular election for one freeholder position, Democrat Linda A. Hynes defeated Republican Incumbent Latham Tiver. In the special election for the remaining 2 years of George Youngkin's term, incumbent Democrat Daniel J. O’Connell, who had originally been appointed to the seat, defeated Republican Lee Schneider. The election gave Democrats control over every county-wide office, except the Surrogate, which they won in 2021.[55] Republicans have not won a county-wide race since 2016. However, the majority of Burlington County's state legislators are still Republicans.

In April 2022, Allison Eckel was appointed to fill the seat expiring in December 2022 that became vacant after Linda Hynes resigned to take office as a New Jersey Superior Court judge.[56] The following month, Burlington County Republicans filed suit, claiming that Eckel should be removed from office and the seat left vacant until November 2022, because the statutory timeline for the appointment was not followed.[57]

Federal representatives[edit]

Two federal Congressional Districts cover the county. Most of the county is in the 3rd District, with a sliver in the west being in the 1st District.[58] For the 118th United States Congress, New Jersey's 1st congressional district is represented by Donald Norcross (D, Camden).[59][60] For the 118th United States Congress, New Jersey's 3rd congressional district is represented by Andy Kim (D, Moorestown).[61]

State representatives[edit]

The 40 municipalities of Burlington County are part of four separate legislative districts.

District Senator[62] Assembly[62] Municipalities
6th James Beach (D) Louis Greenwald (D)

Pamela Rosen Lampitt (D)

Maple Shade Township. The remainder of this district covers portions of Camden County.
7th Troy Singleton (D) Herb Conaway (D)

Carol A. Murphy (D)

Beverly, Bordentown City, Bordentown Township, Burlington City, Burlington Township, Cinnaminson Township, Delanco Township, Delran Township, Edgewater Park, Fieldsboro, Florence Township, Moorestown, Mount Laurel, Palmyra Borough, Riverside, Riverton and Willingboro.
8th Latham Tiver (R) Brandon Umba (R)

Andrea Katz (D)

Bass River Township, Chesterfield Township, Eastampton Township, Evesham Township, Hainesport Township, Lumberton, Mansfield Township, Medford, Medford Lakes, Mount Holly, New Hanover, Pemberton Borough, Pemberton Township, Shamong Township, Southampton Township, Springfield Township, Tabernacle Township, Washington Township, Westampton, Woodland Township, and Wrightstown. The remainder of this district covers portions of Atlantic County.
12th Owen Henry (R) Ronald S. Dancer (R)

Robert D. Clifton (R)

North Hanover. The remainder of this district covers portions of Middlesex County, Monmouth County and Ocean County.

Law enforcement[edit]

The Burlington County Sheriff's Department is headed by a sheriff elected to a three-year term. The sheriff is James H. Kostoplis, elected in 2023.[63] It is a member of the New York-New Jersey Regional Fugitive Task Force.[64] The department has an Administrative Buerau, Operations Bureau and a Courts Bureau. The Administrative Bureau is headed by an Undersheriff and includes a Chief Warrant Officer, Sheriff's Lieutenant, two Sheriff's Sergeants, Sheriff's Officers and a cadre of civilian staff. The Administrative Bureau includes Community Outreach, Recruiting, Civil Process, and Internal Affairs. The Operations Bureau is headed by an undersheriff and includes a Sheriff's Sergeant. The Operations Bureau includes the Warrant/Fugitive Section, K9 Operations, Patrol, Emergency Services Unit (ESU), and Special Operations. The Courts Division is headed by an undersheriff and includes a sheriff's officer, a lieutenant, two sergeants and Sheriff's officers. This section provides security to the courts and the State Judiciary. [63] Notable former sheriffs include William Norton Shinn (1825-1828), Samuel A. Dobbins (1854-1857), and Jean Stanfield (2001-2019).

The county is also home to the majority of 42,000-acre (17,000 ha) megabase, Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, the entire Air Force Activity / Headquarters of JB MDL McGuire Air Force Base, and all of the main portions of the Army Support Activity, Fort Dix and most training grounds / shooting ranges lie within the county borders in New Hanover, North Hanover, Pemberton, and Springfield townships.[65][66]

Politics[edit]

While historically a swing county in New Jersey politics, Burlington County has become reliably Democratic in recent decades, including in more affluent communities that have developed new residential areas, such as Medford, Mount Laurel, Moorestown, and Evesham Township (as opposed to areas along the Delaware River occupied by minority and working-class households). Burlington County has closely matched statewide totals in recent presidential, senatorial, and gubernatorial elections, making it an important bellwether. As of October 1, 2021, there were a total of 353,613 registered voters in Burlington County, of whom 139,745 (39.5%) were registered as Democrats, 90,754 (25.7%) were registered as Republicans and 118,992 (33.7%) were registered as unaffiliated. There were 4,122 voters (1.2%) registered to other parties.[67] Among the county's 2010 Census population, 65.2% were registered to vote, included 76.8% of those ages 18 and over.[68][69]

In the 2020 presidential election, however, the county voted a few points more Democratic than the state as a whole. In the 2016 election, the county mostly voted in the line with the state. In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 126,377 votes countywide, ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 87,401 votes (40.2%) and other candidates with 2,158 votes (1.0%), among the 217,428 ballots cast by the county's 291,760 registered voters, for a turnout of 74.5%.[68][70] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 131,219 votes in the county, ahead of Republican John McCain with 89,626 votes (39.9%) and other candidates with 2,329 votes (1.0%), among the 224,740 ballots cast by the county's 280,836 registered voters, for a turnout of 80.0%.[71]

United States presidential election results for Burlington County, New Jersey[72]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 103,345 39.35% 154,595 58.86% 4,710 1.79%
2016 89,272 40.34% 121,725 55.01% 10,286 4.65%
2012 87,401 40.40% 126,377 58.42% 2,561 1.18%
2008 89,626 40.05% 131,219 58.64% 2,930 1.31%
2004 95,936 46.13% 110,411 53.09% 1,609 0.77%
2000 72,254 40.70% 99,506 56.05% 5,781 3.26%
1996 57,337 35.00% 85,086 51.94% 21,386 13.06%
1992 63,709 36.75% 72,845 42.02% 36,803 21.23%
1988 87,416 58.30% 61,140 40.77% 1,393 0.93%
1984 89,815 60.83% 57,467 38.92% 377 0.26%
1980 68,415 51.94% 50,083 38.03% 13,211 10.03%
1976 60,960 48.07% 63,309 49.92% 2,551 2.01%
1972 70,805 61.97% 41,520 36.34% 1,935 1.69%
1968 46,177 46.29% 41,651 41.76% 11,919 11.95%
1964 31,215 35.09% 57,638 64.80% 92 0.10%
1960 42,112 51.65% 39,321 48.22% 106 0.13%
1956 38,145 61.06% 24,258 38.83% 68 0.11%
1952 30,202 54.18% 25,482 45.71% 60 0.11%
1948 21,183 49.92% 20,801 49.02% 448 1.06%
1944 18,765 45.26% 22,623 54.57% 72 0.17%
1940 21,161 44.20% 26,574 55.50% 143 0.30%
1936 18,644 41.29% 26,095 57.78% 420 0.93%
1932 23,623 58.14% 15,824 38.95% 1,182 2.91%
1928 30,224 73.19% 10,972 26.57% 98 0.24%
1924 21,617 70.23% 7,794 25.32% 1,369 4.45%
1920 17,898 68.73% 7,532 28.92% 611 2.35%
1916 8,803 56.36% 6,535 41.84% 282 1.81%
1912 3,967 28.33% 5,592 39.93% 4,445 31.74%
1908 9,019 57.17% 6,273 39.76% 485 3.07%
1904 8,655 59.91% 4,962 34.35% 830 5.75%
1900 8,394 57.60% 5,555 38.12% 624 4.28%
1896 9,371 63.70% 4,610 31.33% 731 4.97%

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 66,723 votes in Burlington County (48.0%), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 63,114 votes (45.4%), Independent Chris Daggett with 6,333 votes (4.6%) and other candidates with 1,661 votes (1.2%), among the 139,030 ballots cast by the county's 282,209 registered voters, yielding a 49.3% turnout rate.[73] In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 79,220 votes countywide, ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 46,161 votes (35.8%) and other candidates with 1,512 votes (1.2%), among the 129,060 ballots cast by the county's 289,900 registered voters, yielding a 44.5% turnout.[74] In the 2017 gubernatorial election, Republican Kim Guadagno received 52,191 (41.8%) of the vote, and Democrat Phil Murphy received 70,453 (56.5%) of the vote. In the 2021 gubernatorial election, Republican Jack Ciattarelli received 46.1% of the vote (71,772 ballots cast) to Democrat Phil Murphy's 53.3% (82,877 votes).

Gubernatorial election results
Year Republican Democratic
2021 46.1% 71,772 53.3% 82,877
2017 41.8% 52,191 56.5% 70,453
2013 62.3% 79,220 36.3% 46,161
2009 48.4% 66,723 45.8% 63,114
2005 46.5% 57,908 50.5% 64,421
2001 42.5% 48,098 55.4% 62,297
1997 43.9% 55,523 47.5% 60,090
1993 48.7% 48.1%
1989 35.9% 38,774 62.8% 67,600
1985 68.7% 56,573 30.5% 25,078
1981 46.2% 45,949 52.5% 52,421
1977 34.2% 31,378 61.1% 55,991
1973 28.9% 23,319 64.8% 52,273

Municipalities[edit]

Map of Burlington County municipalities (click to see index key)
Map
Interactive map of municipalities in Burlington County.

Municipalities have their own municipal courts, which handle traffic and minor criminal and civil matters, and the New Jersey Superior Court handles more serious cases. The 40 municipalities in Burlington County (with 2010 Census data for population, housing units, and area) are:[76]

Municipality Map key Mun.
type
Pop. Housing
units
Total
area
Water
area
Land
area
Pop.
density
Housing
density
School District Communities[77]
Bass River
Township
10 township 1,443 587 78.27 3.22 75.04 19.2 7.8 Pinelands (7-12)
Bass River (PK-6)
Harrisville
New Gretna
Beverly 3 city 2,577 1,086 0.78 0.23 0.55 4,645.4 1,957.7 Palmyra (S/R) (9-12)
Beverly (PK-8)
Bordentown 6 city 3,924 2,014 0.97 0.04 0.93 4,222.3 2,167.1 Bordentown
Bordentown
Township
28 township 11,367 4,360 9.33 0.82 8.51 1,335.0 512.1 Bordentown
Burlington 4 city 9,920 4,223 3.78 0.72 3.06 3,239.1 1,378.9 Burlington City
Burlington
Township
31 township 22,594 8,105 13.98 0.56 13.42 1,684.2 604.2 Burlington Township
Chesterfield
Township
27 township 7,699 1,601 21.52 0.19 21.33 360.9 75.0 Northern Burlco (7-12)
Chesterfield (PK-6)
Crosswicks
Davisville
Cinnaminson
Township
39 township 15,569 5,758 8.06 0.56 7.50 2,074.5 767.2 Cinnaminson
Delanco
Township
35 township 4,283 1,853 3.35 0.99 2.36 1,817.9 786.5 Riverside (S/R) (9-12)
Delanco (K-8)
Delran
Township
37 township 16,896 6,442 7.21 0.62 6.59 2,563.4 977.4 Delran Bridgeboro
Eastampton
Township
23 township 6,069 2,380 5.83 0.08 5.75 1,055.6 414.0 Rancocas Valley (9-12)
Eastampton (K-8)
Edgewater Park 34 township 8,881 3,926 3.04 0.15 2.89 3,068.8 1,356.6 Burlington City (S/R) (9-12)
Edgewater Park (PK-8)
Evesham
Township
18 township 45,538 18,303 29.71 0.42 29.28 1,555.1 625.0 Lenape (9-12)
Evesham (PK-8)
Cropwell
Marlton CDP (10,133)
Fieldsboro 5 borough 540 221 0.27 0.00 0.27 2,007.7 821.7 Bordentown
Florence
Township
30 township 12,109 5,053 10.18 0.40 9.78 1,238.1 516.6 Florence Florence CDP (4,426)
Roebling CDP (3,715)
Hainesport
Township
20 township 6,110 2,305 6.72 0.26 6.46 945.9 356.8 Rancocas Valley (9-12)
Hainesport (PK-8)
Lumberton
Township
21 township 12,559 4,719 13.06 0.13 12.92 971.7 365.1 Rancocas Valley (9-12)
Lumberton (PK-8)
Eayrestown
Fostertown
Mansfield
Township
29 township 8,544 3,529 21.91 0.17 21.74 393.0 162.3 Northern Burlco (7-12)
Mansfield (PK-6)
Columbus
Georgetown
Hedding
Kinkora
Maple Shade
Township
40 township 19,131 9,186 3.82 0.00 3.82 5,006.1 2,403.7 Maple Shade
Medford 17 township 23,033 8,652 39.93 1.01 38.92 591.8 222.3 Lenape (9-12)
Medford (PK-8)
Chairville
Medford Lakes 9 borough 4,146 1,543 1.29 0.13 1.16 3,569.5 1,328.4 Lenape (9-12)
Medford Lakes (PK-8)
Moorestown
Township
38 township 20,726 7,862 14.92 0.23 14.69 1,410.6 535.1 Moorestown Moorestown-Lenola CDP (14,217)
Mount Holly 22 township 9,536 3,861 2.85 0.05 2.81 3,397.9 1,375.8 Rancocas Valley (9-12)
Mount Holly (K-8)
Mount Laurel 19 township 41,864 18,249 21.97 0.28 21.69 1,930.0 841.3 Lenape (9-12)
Mount Laurel (PK-8)
Fellowship
Hartford
Masonville
Ramblewood CDP (5,907)
Rancocas Woods
New Hanover
Township
25 township 7,385 613 22.40 0.22 22.18 333.0 27.6 Bordentown (S/R) (9-12)
New Hanover (PK-8)
Cookstown
Fort Dix CDP (part; 5,951)
McGuire Air Force Base CDP (part; 737)
North Hanover
Township
26 township 7,678 3,370 17.42 0.14 17.28 444.2 195.0 Northern Burlco (7-12)
North Hanover (PK-6)
Arneytown
Jacobstown
McGuire Air Force Base CDP (part; 2,973)
Palmyra 1 borough 7,398 3,392 2.55 0.69 1.86 3,968.4 1,819.5 Palmyra
Pemberton 8 borough 1,409 642 0.60 0.02 0.58 2,408.7 1,097.5 Pemberton Township (S/R)
Pemberton
Township
15 township 27,912 10,749 62.50 1.22 61.28 455.5 175.4 Pemberton Township Birmingham
Browns Mills CDP (11,243)
Browns Mills Junction
Comical Corner
Country Lake Estates CDP (3,943)
Fort Dix CDP (part; 1,765)
New Lisbon
Ong's Hat
Pemberton Heights CDP (2,423)
Presidential Lakes Estates CDP (2,365)
Riverside
Township
36 township 8,079 3,147 1.61 0.12 1.49 5,425.9 2,113.5 Riverside
Riverton 2 borough 2,779 1,112 0.97 0.30 0.66 4,179.4 1,672.3 Palmyra (S/R) (9-12)
Riverton (K-8)
Shamong
Township
12 township 6,490 2,227 44.99 0.60 44.39 146.2 50.2 Lenape (9-12)
Shamong (K-8)
Atsion
High Crossing
Southampton
Township
16 township 10,464 5,024 44.22 0.56 43.67 239.6 115.1 Lenape (9-12)
Southampton (K-8)
Beaverville
Buddtown
Burrs Mill
Chairville
Ewansville
Leisuretowne CDP (3,282)
Retreat
Vincentown
Springfield
Township
24 township 3,414 1,217 30.00 0.06 29.94 114.0 40.6 Northern Burlco (7-12)
Springfield (K-6)
Arneys Mount
Fort Dix CDP (part)
Jacksonville
Juilustown CDP (429)
Jobstown
Tabernacle
Township
13 township 6,949 2,445 49.61 0.49 49.12 141.5 49.8 Lenape (9-12)
Tabernacle (PK-8)
Washington
Township
11 township 687 284 102.71 3.18 99.52 6.9 2.9 Greater Egg Harbor (S/R) (9-12)
Washington (PK-8)
Batsto
Green Bank
Westampton 32 township 8,813 3,291 11.19 0.17 11.03 799.4 298.5 Rancocas Valley (9-12)
Westampton (K-8)
Rancocas
Timbuctoo
Willingboro
Township
33 township 31,629 11,442 8.15 0.41 7.74 4,087.3 1,478.6 Willingboro
Woodland
Township
14 township 1,788 494 96.39 1.83 94.56 18.9 5.2 Lenape (9-12)
Woodland (PK-8)
Bullock
Chatsworth
Wrightstown 7 borough 802 348 1.77 0.00 1.77 453.6 196.8 Bordentown (S/R) (9-12)
New Hanover (PK-8)
Burlington County county 448,734 175,615 819.84 21.26 798.58 561.9 219.9

Education[edit]

Tertiary education[edit]

Rowan College at Burlington County is a two-year public community college serving students from Burlington County. The school, located at campuses in Pemberton and Mount Laurel and was founded in 1966 and opened to students in 1969.[78]

K-12 schools[edit]

School districts in Burlington County include:[79][80][81]

K-12:

Secondary
Elementary
Non-operating

The U.S. Census Bureau lists Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst in Burlington County as having its own school district.[81] Students attend area school district public schools, as the Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA) does not operate any schools on that base. Students on-post in the McGuire and Dix areas (McGuire Air Force Base and Fort Dix) may attend one of the following in their grade levels, with all siblings in a family taking the same choice: North Hanover Township (for elementary), Northern Burlington County Regional (for secondary), and Pemberton Township (for K-12).[82]

Libraries[edit]

The Burlington County Library became the first county library in New Jersey when it was established in 1921 in Mount Holly. Library service grew in popularity and several moves ensued as more space became a necessity. By 1971, a new headquarters facility had been constructed, Cinnaminson Township and Bordentown had joined the system as branches, and a bookmobile visited areas without local facilities. Medford and Evesham Township had joined the system by 1975. The Pemberton Township Branch joined the system in 1987. Maple Shade Township became a branch in April 2001 while Riverton, the newest branch, joined in December 2003. With a larger network of nine additional member libraries, the system provides a range of services to its residents.[83]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

Garden State Parkway entering Burlington County from the south

As of May 2010, the county had a total of 2,609.74 miles (4,199.97 km) of roadways, of which 1,913.83 miles (3,080.01 km) were maintained by the local municipality, 504.18 miles (811.40 km) by Burlington County, 154.01 miles (247.86 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation, 0.93 miles (1.50 km) by the Burlington County Bridge Commission and 36.61 miles (58.92 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority.[84]

A variety of major routes were constructed through Burlington County. Major county roads include County Route 528, County Route 530, County Route 532, County Route 534 (only in Shamong Township), County Route 537, County Route 541, County Route 542, County Route 543, County Route 544, County Route 545 and County Route 563. State Routes that pass through are Route 38, Route 68, Route 70, Route 72, Route 73, Route 90 (only in Cinnaminson Township), and Route 413 (only in Burlington). U.S. Routes that traverse are U.S. Route 9 (only in Bass River Township), U.S. Route 130 and U.S. Route 206. Limited access roads include the Garden State Parkway (a 7.4 miles (11.9 km) stretch in Bass River Township[85]), Interstate 295 and the New Jersey Turnpike (a portion of Interstate 95).

The turnpike extends through the county for approximately 30.1 miles (48.4 km) from Cherry Hill in Camden County to Hamilton Township in Mercer County (including the 6.5 miles (10.5 km) Turnpike Extension from the turnpike bridge over the Delaware River to the mainline at Exit 6).[86][87]

The county has five Turnpike interchanges: Exit 4 in Mount Laurel, Exit 5 in Westampton, Exit 6A in Florence Township, Exit 6 in Mansfield Township, and Exit 7 in Bordentown Township.[88]

The New Jersey Turnpike Authority has widened the Parkway to three lanes in each direction from exit 80 in South Toms River, Ocean County to exit 30 in Somers Point, Atlantic County, which included widening of bridges at several river crossings.[89] The Authority extended the 'dual-dual' configuration (inner car lanes and outer car / truck / bus lanes) on the turnpike south to Exit 6 from its former end at Exit 8A in Monroe Township, Middlesex County. This was finished in early November 2014.[90][91]

Bridges[edit]

The Tacony-Palmyra Bridge, a drawbridge that crosses the upper Delaware River from Palmyra, New Jersey to the Tacony section of Philadelphia

The Burlington County Bridge Commission maintains the Tacony–Palmyra Bridge and the Burlington–Bristol Bridge, both of which cross the Delaware River. The agency also maintains several bridges along CR 543, including the Riverside–Delanco Bridge over the Rancocas Creek.[92]

The Tacony–Palmyra Bridge is a combination steel tied arch and double-leaf bascule bridge across the Delaware River that connects New Jersey Route 73 in Palmyra with Pennsylvania Route 73 in the Tacony section of Philadelphia. Designed by architect Ralph Modjeski, the bridge is 3,659 feet (1,115 m) long and spans 2,324 feet (708 m). After 18 months of construction, the bridge opened in 1929, replacing ferry service that had operated between the two places since 1922.[93]

The Burlington–Bristol Bridge is a truss bridge with a lift span crossing the Delaware River from Burlington to Bristol Township, Pennsylvania. Construction of the bridge started on April 1, 1930, and the bridge opened to traffic on May 2, 1931. The two-lane bridge is 2,301 feet (701 m) long; The lift span is 540 feet (164.6 m) long.[94]

The 13.5 million toll-paying trips on the Burlington–Bristol and Tacony–Palmyra bridges and the per-car toll of $4 (reduced to $3 with E-ZPass) for cars heading into Pennsylvania generated $51 million in revenue in 2016.[95]

The Riverside–Delanco Bridge is a truss bridge with a central swing span that carries County Route 543 across the Rancocas Creek, between Riverside Township and Delanco Township. The current bridge was built in 1934–1935 to replace the 1901 bridge, which itself replaced an 1870 structure.[96]

Public transportation[edit]

The River Line is a diesel light-rail system operated for NJ Transit by the Southern New Jersey Rail Group on a former Pennsylvania Railroad line between the Trenton Transit Center in Trenton and the Walter Rand Transportation Center and other stations in Camden, with 11 stations in the county.[97]

NJ Transit operates bus service into Philadelphia on the following routes; 317, 406, 409 414, and 417 routes, and into Camden only on the following routes; 407, 413, 418, 419 and 457; and to Atlantic City on the 559 route.[98][99]

Academy Bus Lines operates buses from Mount Holly, Mount Laurel, Westampton and Willingboro Township to New York City's Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan as well as the Wall Street area of Lower Manhattan.[100]

The BurLink bus service provides three routes, under service funded by the county and operated by Stout's Transportation, providing connections to NJ Transit's bus and rail service.[101]

Wineries[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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