Buster Brown (Australian band)

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Buster Brown
Origin Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Genres Rock and Roll, Hard rock
Years active 1973–1975
Labels Mushroom, Aztec
Associated acts Rose Tattoo
AC/DC
The Ferrets
Past members see members list below

Buster Brown was an Australian rock and roll band, which featured vocalist Angry Anderson and drummer Phil Rudd, that was formed in Melbourne in 1973. Their sound was hard rock mixed with blues rock influences. Their first album, Something to Say was produced by Lobby Loyde and released in 1974. Rudd left to join an early version of AC/DC while Anderson continued with new line-ups and eventually disbanded the group in November 1975. Anderson joined Rose Tattoo which later included former Buster Brown band mates, Geordie Leach on bass guitar and Dallas 'Digger' Royall on drums.

History[edit]

Buster Brown was formed in Melbourne in 1973 with Gary 'Angry' Anderson on lead vocals (ex-Peace Power and Purity), John Moon on guitar, Paul Grant on guitar, Phil Rudd on drums, Ian Ryan on bass guitar (ex-Ash, Chook) and Chris Wilson on keyboards.[1][2] They enjoyed local notoriety and played at the 1974 Sunbury Festival in January.[3] Later that year, Mushroom Records released a Various Artists live album, Highlights of Sunbury '74 Part 1 which included the group's tracks "Roll Over Beethoven" and "Buster Brown".[1] Early in the year, Geordie Leach replaced Ryan on bass guitar. Along with Coloured Balls, Billy Thorpe, Madder Lake and Chain, they were supported by suburban-based sharpie gangs.[4]

The band's first single, "Buster Brown" was issued in July 1974 by Mushroom Records. Veteran rocker, Lobby Loyde (lead guitarist of Coloured Balls) produced their debut album, Something to Say which was also released in December but by the end of the year the group had split with Rudd joining an early version of AC/DC.[1] A second single, "Something to Say" was subsequently in January 1975. From April to June 1975 the line-up resumed as Anderson, Leach and Wilson with Dennis Millar on guitar and Trevor Young on drums (ex-Coloured Balls).[1][2] In July, Anderson formed a third version of the band with Ken Firth on bass guitar (ex-Tully), Billy Miller on guitar and vocals, Dave Springfield on guitar and drummer Dallas 'Digger' Royal (ex-Band of Talabene).[1][2]

The group disbanded in November 1975, Anderson initially tried to form a band with Loyde.[1] Firth, Miller and Springfield regrouped as The Ferrets.[5] In late 1976 Anderson joined Sydney-based rockers Rose Tattoo which later included former Buster Brown band mates, Geordie Leach on bass guitar and Dallas 'Digger' Royall on drums.[6][7][8] According to Australian rock music historian Ian McFarlane, Buster Brown were "one of the most notorious streetlevel/ boogie outfits of its day ... [they] built up a solid following around the pubs, and among the skinheads on the suburban dance circuit".[1] In 2005, Aztec Music remastered Something to Say on CD with six bonus tracks.[2]

Members[edit]

  • Angry Anderson – vocals (1973–1975)
  • Ken Firth – bass guitar (1975)
  • Paul Grant – guitar (1973–1974)
  • Geordie Leach – bass guitar (1973–1975)
  • Tony Lunt – drums (1974)
  • Dennis Millar – guitar (1975)
  • Billy Miller – guitar, vocals (1975)
  • John Moon – guitar (1973–1974)
  • Dallas Royal – drums (1975)
  • Phil Rudd – drums (1973–1974)
  • Ian Ryan – bass guitar (1973)
  • Dave Springfield – guitar (1975)
  • Chris Wilson – keyboards (1973–1975)
  • Trevor Young – drums (1975)

Discography[edit]

Albums[edit]

Track listing

All tracks written by Gary 'Angry' Anderson, Paul Grant, Geordie Leach, John Moon, Phillip Rudzevecuis (aka Phil Rudd), and Chris Wilson,[nb 1] unless otherwise indicated.

No. Title Length
1. "Rock and Roll Lady" 4:40
2. "Let Me In" 3:51
3. "Buster Brown" 4:22
4. "Roll Over Beethoven" (Chuck Berry) 4:47
5. "Young Spunk" 6:08
6. "Apprentice" 5:37
7. "Something to Say" 5:27
Total length: 35:52

Singles[edit]

  • "Buster Brown"/"Rock and Roll Lady" – Mushroom (K-5558) (July 1974)
  • "Something to Say"/"Let Me In" – Mushroom (K-5731) (January 1975)

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Songwriting credits per track from Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA).[9][10][11][12][13][14][15]

References[edit]

General
Specific
  1. ^ a b c d e f g McFarlane 'Buster Brown' entry. Retrieved 18 June 2011.
  2. ^ a b c d Holmgren, Magnus. "Buster Brown". Australian Rock Database. Passagen.se (Magnus Holmgren). Archived from the original on 27 November 2013. Retrieved 1 March 2014. 
  3. ^ Kimball, Sunbury Festival 1974. Retrieved 19 June 2011.
  4. ^ Cockington, James (2001). "The Cardie Cult". Long Way to the Top: Stories of Australian Rock & Roll. Sydney, NSW: Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC). pp. 179–182. ISBN 978-0-7333-0750-8. 
  5. ^ McFarlane 'The Ferrets' entry. Retrieved 18 June 2011.
  6. ^ McFarlane 'Rose Tattoo' entry. Retrieved 18 June 2011.
  7. ^ Holmgren, Magnus. "Rose Tattoo". Australian Rock Database. Passagen.se (Magnus Holmgren). Archived from the original on 22 October 2013. Retrieved 1 March 2014. 
  8. ^ Nimmervoll, Ed. "Rose Tattoo". Howlspace – The Living History of Our Music (Ed Nimmervoll). White Room Electronic Publishing Pty Ltd. Archived from the original on 29 January 2003. Retrieved 11 February 2014. 
  9. ^ "Rock and Roll Lady". APRA search engine. Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Archived from the original on 24 September 2012. Retrieved 24 June 2011. 
  10. ^ "Let Me In". APRA search engine. Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Archived from the original on 24 September 2012. Retrieved 24 June 2011. 
  11. ^ "Buster Brown". APRA search engine. Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Archived from the original on 24 September 2012. Retrieved 24 June 2011. 
  12. ^ "Roll Over Beethoven". APRA search engine. Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Archived from the original on 24 September 2012. Retrieved 24 June 2011. 
  13. ^ "Young Spunk". APRA search engine. Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Archived from the original on 24 September 2012. Retrieved 24 June 2011. 
  14. ^ "Apprentice". APRA search engine. Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Archived from the original on 24 September 2012. Retrieved 24 June 2011. 
  15. ^ "Something to Say". APRA search engine. Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Archived from the original on 24 September 2012. Retrieved 24 June 2011.