Butes

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In Greek mythology, the name Butes (/ˈbjuːtz/; Βούτης) referred to several different people.

  1. Butes, an Argonaut, son of Teleon and Zeuxippe (daughter of Eridanus).[1][2][3] When the Argonauts were sailing past the Sirens, he was the only one who was unable resist the charm of their singing, swimming off to them. But Aphrodite saved Butes by transferring him to Lilybaeum in Sicily, where he became her lover.[4][5] Other accounts call him a famous bee keeper and a native Sicilian king.[6] He was the father of Eryx by Aphrodite,[7] and also of Polycaon.[8]
  2. Butes, a Thracian, Boreas' son, who was hostile towards his stepbrother Lycurgus and was driven out of the country by him. He settled in the island of Strongyle (Naxos) with a bunch of men, and proceeded to attack those who sailed past the island. As there were no women on Strongyle to begin with, they would sail here and there to seize some from the land, but were not quite successful. When they landed in Thessaly for that purpose, Butes offended Dionysus by raping Coronis, a Maenad, and was made insane upon her imploration, in which state he threw himself down a well and died. His companions did abduct some women, including Iphimedeia and her daughter Pancratis.[9]
  3. Butes, son of Pandion I and Zeuxippe. He was a priest of Poseidon and Athena and was worshipped as a hero by the Athenians. He was married to Chthonia, daughter of his brother Erechtheus.[10]
  4. Butes, a member of the clan of Amycus, from Bithynia, who, despite being a champion wrestler, was killed by Dares in a boxing match.[11]
  5. Butes, a servant of Anchises.[12]
  6. Butes, a warrior who fought under Aeneas and was killed by Camilla.[13]
  7. Butes, a warrior who fought against Thebes with the Seven and was killed by Haemon.[14]
  8. Butes, son of Pallas and brother of Clytus; the two brothers were younger companions of Cephalus.[15]
  9. Butes, possible father of Hippodamia (wife of Pirithous).[16] She is otherwise referred to as daughter of Atrax.[17]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bibliotheca 1. 9. 16
  2. ^ Hyginus, Fabulae, 14
  3. ^ Argonautica Orphica, 138
  4. ^ Bibliotheca 1. 9. 25
  5. ^ Servius on Aeneid, 1. 574, 5. 24
  6. ^ Diodorus Siculus, Library of History, 4. 83. 1
  7. ^ Diodorus Siculus, Library of History, 4. 23. 2
  8. ^ Pausanias, Description of Greece, 4. 2. 1
  9. ^ Diodorus Siculus, Library of History, 5. 50. 1-5
  10. ^ Bibliotheca 3. 14. 8, 3. 15. 1
  11. ^ Virgil, Aeneid, 5. 372 ff
  12. ^ Virgil, Aeneid, 9. 648
  13. ^ Virgil, Aeneid, 11. 690
  14. ^ Statius, Thebaid, 8. 484
  15. ^ Ovid, Metamorphoses, 7. 500
  16. ^ Diodorus Siculus, Library of History, 4. 70. 3
  17. ^ Ovid, Heroides, 17. 248