Butler County, Ohio

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Butler County
Butler County Courthouse
Official seal of Butler County
Map of Ohio highlighting Butler County
Location within the U.S. state of Ohio
Map of the United States highlighting Ohio
Ohio's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 39°26′N 84°35′W / 39.44°N 84.58°W / 39.44; -84.58
Country United States
State Ohio
FoundedMay 1, 1803[1]
Named forGeneral Richard Butler
SeatHamilton
Largest cityHamilton
Area
 • Total470 sq mi (1,200 km2)
 • Land467 sq mi (1,210 km2)
 • Water3.1 sq mi (8 km2)  0.7%%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total390,357
 • Density830/sq mi (320/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional district8th
Websitewww.butlercountyohio.org

Butler County is a county located in the southwestern part of the U.S. state of Ohio. As of the 2020 census, the population was 390,357.[2] Its county seat is Hamilton.[3] It is named for General Richard Butler, who died in 1791 during St. Clair's Defeat.[4] Located along the Great Miami River, it is also home to Miami University, a public university founded in 1809. Butler County is part of the Cincinnati, OH-KY-IN Metropolitan Statistical Area. The majority of the county is in District 52 of the State House.

History[edit]

Successive cultures of ancient Indigenous peoples of the Americas occupied areas of the county. They built large earthworks, seven of which were still standing and recorded by a Smithsonian survey.[5]

Early French explorers likely passed through the area along the Miami River.[6] The gravesites of David and Margaret Gregory indicate they were some of the first white settlers in the area in Liberty Township. White settlers began moving into the area in larger numbers after the 1793 Treaty of Greenville was signed with the Native Americans of the area.[6]

Butler County was formed on March 24, 1803 from portions of Hamilton County. It is named for General Richard Butler.[7] Between 1803 and 1823, the townships of the county became officially recognized.[6] Large portions of the county were held by non-resident owners, including 640 acres owned by future President William H Harrison.[6] Some land that was originally part of Butler County was reassigned to Warren County in the north and Hamilton County to the south. Butler County's original size was 480 sq miles.[6]

Around the late 1860s or early 1870s, the community of Mauds was the sight of an attempt by a local entrepreneur to construct a mill that worked via perpetual motion. A large crowd gathered to watch the mill start, and when it did not, laughter ensued. Nothing was heard from the unnamed entrepreneur again, and the mill quickly vanished. The local newspapers did not record the event, and the only record of its occurrence was transmitted by elderly residents of Mauds to one William Marion Miller of Miami University.[8]

The Great Flood of 1913 affected much of the county, particularly the communities of Middletown, Ohio where approximately 25% of the town was flooded and 6 people died and Hamilton, Ohio, where 46% of the city was flooded, over 300 buildings destroyed, and at least 98 people killed.[9]

In the 1920s, Butler, Pickaway and Washington counties were central areas of the rural membership of the Ku Klux Klan in Ohio.[10]

In 1957 the Ohio Legislature established Hueston Woods State Park, which covers 3,596 acres in Butler and neighboring Preble County. In addition to a 625-acre manmade lake, the park contains the 200-acre Hueston Woods, one of the last near-virgin growths of American beech and maple in Ohio.[11]

Geography and geology[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 470 square miles (1,200 km2), of which 467 square miles (1,210 km2) is land and 3.1 square miles (8.0 km2) (0.7%) is water.[12]

The majority of Butler County consists of the river valleys of the Great and Little Miami Rivers. The valley was originally carved by glaciation.[6]

The soil at highest uplands is frequently heavy in clay, moving downhill to a sandy loam, while in the valleys the soil is black with river deposits.[6]

Before deforestation by settlers, much of the area was forests of American beech and maple trees.[11]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
181011,150
182021,74695.0%
183027,14224.8%
184028,1733.8%
185030,7899.3%
186035,84016.4%
187039,91211.4%
188042,5796.7%
189048,59714.1%
190056,87017.0%
191070,27123.6%
192087,02523.8%
1930114,08431.1%
1940120,2495.4%
1950147,20322.4%
1960199,07635.2%
1970226,20713.6%
1980258,78714.4%
1990291,47912.6%
2000332,80714.2%
2010368,13010.6%
2020390,3576.0%
U.S. Decennial Census[13]
1790-1960[14] 1900-1990[15]
1990-2000[16] 2020 [17]

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[18] of 2000, there were 332,807 people, 123,082 households, and 87,880 families residing in the county. The population density was 712 people per square mile (275/km2). There were 129,793 housing units at an average density of 278 per square mile (107/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 91.20% White, 5.27% Black or African American, 0.21% Native American, 1.55% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.62% from other races, and 1.13% from two or more races. 1.43% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 28.1% were of German, 16.7% American, 10.7% Irish, and 9.8% English ancestry according to Census 2000. Those citing "American" ancestry in Butler County are of overwhelmingly English extraction, most English Americans identify simply as American because their ancestors have been in North America for centuries—in some cases since the 1600s.[19][20][21][22][23]

There were 123,082 households, out of which 35.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.00% were married couples living together, 10.70% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.60% were non-families. 22.70% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.60% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.61 and the average family size was 3.07.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 25.90% under the age of 18, 11.90% from 18 to 24, 29.80% from 25 to 44, 21.70% from 45 to 64, and 10.70% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 95.30 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.20 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $47,885, and the median income for a family was $57,513. Males had a median income of $42,052 versus $27,602 for females. The per capita income for the county was $22,076. About 5.40% of families and 8.70% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.10% of those under age 18 and 7.00% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census[edit]

As of the 2010 census, there were 368,130 people, 135,960 households, and 95,404 families residing in the county.[24] The population density was 788.2 inhabitants per square mile (304.3/km2). There were 148,273 housing units at an average density of 317.5 per square mile (122.6/km2).[25] The racial makeup of the county was 86.0% white, 7.3% black or African American, 2.4% Asian, 0.2% American Indian, 0.1% Pacific islander, 1.8% from other races, and 2.1% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 4.0% of the population.[24] In terms of ancestry, 27.0% were German, 14.8% were American, 13.6% were Irish, and 9.7% were English.[26]

Of the 135,960 households, 35.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.9% were married couples living together, 12.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 29.8% were non-families, and 23.5% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.63 and the average family size was 3.10. The median age was 36.0 years.[24]

The median income for a household in the county was $54,788 and the median income for a family was $68,539. Males had a median income of $50,499 versus $37,094 for females. The per capita income for the county was $25,892. About 8.3% of families and 12.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.1% of those under age 18 and 6.8% of those age 65 or over.[27]

Politics[edit]

Prior to 1952, Butler County was strongly Democratic in presidential elections, only backing two Republican candidates for president from 1856 to 1948. Starting with the 1952 election, it has become a Republican Party stronghold, with the sole Democrat to win the county in a presidential election since then being Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964 in the midst of his statewide and national landslide victory.

United States presidential election results for Butler County, Ohio[28]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 114,392 61.26% 69,613 37.28% 2,732 1.46%
2016 106,976 61.13% 58,642 33.51% 9,376 5.36%
2012 105,176 61.68% 62,388 36.58% 2,966 1.74%
2008 105,341 60.52% 66,030 37.94% 2,688 1.54%
2004 109,872 65.86% 56,243 33.71% 704 0.42%
2000 86,587 63.32% 46,390 33.93% 3,760 2.75%
1996 67,023 54.76% 43,690 35.70% 11,685 9.55%
1992 63,375 48.34% 39,682 30.27% 28,055 21.40%
1988 75,725 68.71% 33,770 30.64% 713 0.65%
1984 76,216 72.92% 27,700 26.50% 598 0.57%
1980 61,231 61.91% 31,796 32.15% 5,874 5.94%
1976 49,625 57.56% 35,123 40.74% 1,469 1.70%
1972 50,380 68.42% 21,194 28.78% 2,061 2.80%
1968 35,962 48.73% 23,649 32.04% 14,191 19.23%
1964 31,413 42.63% 42,278 57.37% 0 0.00%
1960 46,518 58.66% 32,778 41.34% 0 0.00%
1956 41,785 63.20% 24,331 36.80% 0 0.00%
1952 35,769 53.77% 30,751 46.23% 0 0.00%
1948 21,393 46.52% 24,276 52.78% 322 0.70%
1944 22,702 45.96% 26,698 54.04% 0 0.00%
1940 23,380 43.14% 30,821 56.86% 0 0.00%
1936 17,842 35.80% 29,892 59.99% 2,098 4.21%
1932 19,673 44.70% 22,516 51.16% 1,819 4.13%
1928 29,124 64.66% 15,663 34.77% 255 0.57%
1924 19,349 56.25% 11,612 33.76% 3,437 9.99%
1920 14,998 44.91% 16,437 49.22% 1,961 5.87%
1916 5,850 31.81% 10,806 58.75% 1,736 9.44%
1912 3,431 20.59% 7,763 46.59% 5,469 32.82%
1908 7,320 40.61% 9,678 53.70% 1,026 5.69%
1904 7,048 45.44% 7,397 47.69% 1,066 6.87%
1900 6,025 39.52% 8,880 58.25% 339 2.22%
1896 5,936 40.21% 8,724 59.09% 103 0.70%
1892 4,636 36.16% 7,834 61.10% 352 2.75%
1888 4,143 34.77% 7,454 62.55% 319 2.68%
1884 3,976 36.72% 6,751 62.34% 102 0.94%
1880 3,831 37.90% 6,266 62.00% 10 0.10%
1876 3,351 35.68% 6,029 64.20% 11 0.12%
1872 2,993 37.55% 4,926 61.80% 52 0.65%
1868 3,298 40.01% 4,945 59.99% 0 0.00%
1864 3,250 42.96% 4,316 57.04% 0 0.00%
1860 2,867 39.19% 4,109 56.16% 340 4.65%
1856 2,301 37.68% 3,509 57.47% 296 4.85%


Education[edit]

There are sixteen school districts having territory in Butler County.

Primary Boundaries in Butler County[edit]

Partial Boundaries in Butler County[edit]

Private High Schools[edit]

Higher Education[edit]

Butler County is home to top ranked and 10th oldest public university, Miami University.

Campuses[edit]


Butler County is also home to Butler Tech, a Career Technical Education institution for High School students and Adults. Butler Tech has campuses in West Chester and Fairfield Township.

Communities[edit]

Map of Butler County, Ohio with municipal and township labels

Cities[edit]

Villages[edit]

Census-designated places[edit]

Other unincorporated communities[edit]

Townships[edit]

There are thirteen civil townships in Butler County and three paper townships:

Civil[edit]

https://web.archive.org/web/20160715023447/http://www.ohiotownships.org/township-websites

Paper[edit]

  • Hamilton
  • Heritage (Fairfield)[31]
  • Middletown

Ohio House Districts[edit]

Ohio Senate Districts[edit]

Notable people[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Ohio County Profiles: Butler County" (PDF). Ohio Department of Development. Archived from the original (PDF) on June 21, 2007. Retrieved April 28, 2007.
  2. ^ 2020 census
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  4. ^ Rennick, Robert M. (August 28, 2013). Kentucky Place Names. University Press of Kentucky. pp. 103–. ISBN 9780813144016. Retrieved September 6, 2014.
  5. ^ Squier, E.G. (1848). Ancient Monuments of the Mississippi Valley. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution. p. 57. Archived from the original on September 8, 2014.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g Bartlow, Bert Surene (1905). Centennial History of Butler County, Ohio. B. F. Bowen. Retrieved June 22, 2014.
  7. ^ Taylor, William Alexander (1899). Ohio Statesmen and Annals of Progress. Press of the Westbote Company. pp. 243.
  8. ^ Arthur W.J.G. Ord-Hume, Perpetual Motion: The Hisotry of an Obsession (New York: Barnes & Noble, 1977), 208-212.
  9. ^ United States. Weather Bureau (1913). Bulletin: Lettered Ser. United States. Weather Bureau. pp. 54–55.
  10. ^ Giffin, William Wayne (2005). African Americans and the Color Line in Ohio, 1915-1930. Ohio State University Press. pp. 115–. ISBN 9780814210031. Retrieved June 22, 2014.
  11. ^ a b Ney, Jason; Nichols, Terri (November 25, 2009). America's Natural Places: The Midwest. ABC-CLIO. pp. 154–. ISBN 9780313353178. Retrieved June 22, 2014.
  12. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on May 4, 2014. Retrieved February 7, 2015.
  13. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved February 7, 2015.
  14. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Archived from the original on August 11, 2012. Retrieved February 7, 2015.
  15. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 14, 2015. Retrieved February 7, 2015.
  16. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Archived (PDF) from the original on December 18, 2014. Retrieved February 7, 2015.
  17. ^ 2020 census
  18. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  19. ^ "Ancestry of the Population by State: 1980 - Table 3" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on February 24, 2012. Retrieved February 10, 2012.
  20. ^ Sharing the Dream: White Males in a Multicultural America By Dominic J. Pulera.
  21. ^ Reynolds Farley, 'The New Census Question about Ancestry: What Did It Tell Us?', Demography, Vol. 28, No. 3 (August 1991), pp. 414, 421.
  22. ^ Stanley Lieberson and Lawrence Santi, 'The Use of Nativity Data to Estimate Ethnic Characteristics and Patterns', Social Science Research, Vol. 14, No. 1 (1985), pp. 44–46.
  23. ^ Stanley Lieberson and Mary C. Waters, 'Ethnic Groups in Flux: The Changing Ethnic Responses of American Whites', Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Vol. 487, No. 79 (September 1986), pp. 82–86.
  24. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2015.
  25. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2015.
  26. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2015.
  27. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2015.
  28. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Archived from the original on March 23, 2018. Retrieved April 30, 2018.
  29. ^ "Middletown". Miami University Regionals. Retrieved December 16, 2019.
  30. ^ "Farmer School of Business MBA". Miami University. Retrieved March 30, 2019.
  31. ^ [1][permanent dead link]
  32. ^ "Valor awards for Lorenzo D. Immell". Military Times, Hall of Valor. Archived from the original on September 11, 2014. Retrieved September 11, 2014.
  33. ^ Clark, Dave (April 25, 2020). "Green Bay Packers select Indiana guard Simon Stepaniak, former Ross High School standout". Cincinnati Enquirer. Gannett. Retrieved September 17, 2020.

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 39°26′N 84°35′W / 39.44°N 84.58°W / 39.44; -84.58