Côtes-d'Armor

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Côtes-d'Armor
Department
The departmental council and prefectural building in Saint-Brieuc
The departmental council and prefectural building in Saint-Brieuc
Flag of Côtes-d'Armor
Flag
Coat of arms of Côtes-d'Armor
Coat of arms
Location of Côtes-d'Armor in France
Location of Côtes-d'Armor in France
Coordinates: 48°20′N 02°50′E / 48.333°N 2.833°E / 48.333; 2.833Coordinates: 48°20′N 02°50′E / 48.333°N 2.833°E / 48.333; 2.833
Country France
Region Brittany
Prefecture Saint-Brieuc
Subprefectures Dinan
Guingamp
Lannion
Government
 • President of the departmental council Alain Cadec
(LR)
Area1
 • Total 6,878 km2 (2,656 sq mi)
Population (2015)
 • Total 598,357
 • Rank 43rd
 • Density 87/km2 (230/sq mi)
Time zone CET (UTC+1)
 • Summer (DST) CEST (UTC+2)
Department number 22
Arrondissements 4
Cantons 27
Communes 355
^1 French Land Register data, which exclude estuaries, and lakes, ponds, and glaciers larger than 1 km2

Côtes-d'Armor (French pronunciation: ​[kot daʁmɔʁ]; Breton: Aodoù-an-Arvor), formerly known as Côtes-du-Nord, is a department in the north of Brittany, in northwestern France.

History[edit]

Côtes-du-Nord was one of the original 83 departments created on 4 March 1790 following the French Revolution. It was made up from the near entirety of the ancient Pays de Saint-Brieuc, most of historical Trégor, the eastern half of Cornouaille, and the north-western part of the former diocese of Saint-Malo.

In 1990 the name was changed to Côtes-d'Armor: the French word côtes means "coasts" and ar mor is "the sea" in Breton. The name also recalls that of the Roman province of Armorica ("the coastal region").

Geography[edit]

Côtes-d'Armor is part of the current administrative region of Brittany and is bounded by the departments of Ille-et-Vilaine to the east, Morbihan to the south, and Finistère to the west, and by the English Channel to the north.

Demonym[edit]

The inhabitants of the department are known in French as Costarmoricains.

Politics[edit]

Côtes-d'Armor's long tradition of anti-clericalism, especially in the interior around Guingamp (a former Communist stronghold), has often led to the department's being seen as an area of left-wing exceptionalism in an otherwise strongly clerical and right-wing Brittany. The current president of the departmental council, Alain Cadec, is nevertheless a member of the centre-right party, Les Républicains.

Party groupings seats
Centre et droite républicaine 32
Socialiste et républicain 15
Communiste et républicain 5
non-party 2

Culture[edit]

The western part of the département is part of the traditionally Breton-speaking "Lower Brittany" (Breizh-Izel in Breton). The boundary runs from Plouha to Mûr-de-Bretagne. The Breton language has become an intense issue in many parts of Brittany, and many Breton-speakers advocate for bilingual schools. Gallo is also spoken in the east and is offered as a language in the schools and on the baccalaureat exams.

Gallery[edit]

Notable people[edit]

See also[edit]

External links[edit]