C.C. (Code Geass)

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C.C.
Code Geass character
CC 033 animestocks-com--2-.jpg
First appearance Season 1, Episode 1
Voiced by Japanese
Yukana
English
Kate Higgins
Profile
Nickname(s) Immortal Witch
Pizza Girl
Zero's Mistress
Aliases Gray Witch
Information
Allegiance Geass Order
Black Knights
Holy Britannian Empire
Knightmare Frame Gawain (co-pilot)
Akatsuki Command Model Zikisan
Lancelot Frontier

C.C. (シー・ツー, Shī Tsū) is the pseudonym of a fictional character in the Code Geass: Lelouch of the Rebellion franchise by Sunrise. With her real name kept from the audience, she first appeared in the 2006 initial anime season, and afterwards has appeared in many manga, OVA, anime, and video game spinoffs. In the anime, her Japanese voice actress is Yukana Nogami while she is voiced by Kate Higgins in the English dub. Introduced as a captive human test subject of the villainous Holy Britannian Empire, C. C. is revealed to be an immortal young woman with special powers called the Geass. Sardonic, stubborn, and mysterious, she can give Geass powers to others, which she does to main protagonist Lelouch Lamperouge. She becomes an ally and protector of Lelouch, at times piloting a mech and leading the paramilitary group the Black Knights to do so. She later assists Lelouch at destroying other Geass users misusing their powers, including her former students, and supports the regime changes that follow. In the 2006 Anime Grand Prix, C.C. was awarded third place for most popular female character, then first place in the following two years.

Development and depiction[edit]

C.C. (シー・ツー, Shī Tsū) was created as a fictional character for the Code Geass: Lelouch of the Rebellion anime series by Sunrise, who first appeared in 2006 with the premier of the franchise. Her Japanese voice actress is Yukana Nogami,[1][2][3] and she is voiced by Kate Higgins in the English dub.[4] C.C. is an immortal girl who appears as a young adult.[5] C.C. is a pseudonym, and her real name is never shared with the audience.

Famous cosplay artist Yaya Han dressed as C.C. in one of the character's later outfits in the show.

C.C. has long green hair and gold eyes. She wears a variety of outfits, which change depending on the time and situation. In the first season she mainly wears a white straitjacket bondage suit,[6] which the Britannian Empire had used to restrain her for tests prior to the series.[7] According to the 2007 Code Geass audio drama, C.C. wears the bondage suit because she feels she isn't free, and is a slave to the world.[8] Her main outfit in the second season is a modified Black Knights uniform, which is long, black, and has a red sash. It has gloves and white undergarments.[9] She has worn Lelouch's own clothes, including his Zero outfit, to serve as a decoy and save him from situations.[10]

She has spiritual powers, and academic Dani Cavallaro refers to C.C. as the "Witch of Fate" of the Code Geass series.[11] C.C. has the power of the "Code", given to her by a nun hundreds of years prior to Code Geass. The Geass power originally allowed her to make anyone around her love her, before leading to her being immortal and immune to both age and conventional injury.[12] She has survived being burned at the stake, beheaded by a guillotine, and placed in an iron maiden.[13] When she uses her power, a sigil glows on her body.[14] When left alone, she sometimes appears to talk to herself and have discussions with those who aren't there.[15] This is later revealed to be telepathic communication, Lelouch's deceased mother Marianne being among the recipients.[16][17] C.C. can also give people the power of Geass or can cancel their Geass,[18] and sense when other people have it. In close proximity, C.C. can give people hallucinations of dark or chaotic images, to lead people into a panic.

She is a competent leader and operations planner, and can fight with mech,[19] with guns, or hand to hand. In the Picture Dramas, during a discussion with Kallen, she states that she has the ability to do almost anything but chooses to let others do it. Calm and collected, she is strongwilled and pays little mind to inconveniencing others, and at times is with-holding of information. With a dry sense of humor, she has a nihilistic outlook on the world. Scornful of her immortality, she is lonely and isolated, although she shows fondness for the main protagonist Lelouch Lamperouge.

C.C. has a strong liking for pizza, at times risking the exposure of her identity to obtain it.[20][21]

Appearances[edit]

Character background[edit]

Before C.C. gained the power of Geass, she was a ten-year-old orphaned slave. A nun gave C.C. the power of Geass, allowing C.C. to make anyone love her. When C.C. grew tired of forced love, she looked instead for love from the nun, who was above her power. However, when C.C.'s power had grown, the nun revealed she had tricked C.C. as a ploy to lose her immortality, and tortured the young woman until C.C. accepted the nun's Geass.[22] After C.C. gains immortality, a shock sequence in the first season finale shows memories of her past, including repeated "deaths" of different types spanning centuries.[23] Alive for hundreds of years, she speaks to Lelouch of Washington's Rebellion, referring to George Washington and Benjamin Franklin as if she had been close with both.[24] She claims to have entered into magical Geass contracts with hundreds of people over her lifetime, in futile attempts to lose her immortality.

One of her previous contracts was with the late Imperial Consort Marianne, the mother of the lead protagonist of Code Geass, Lelouch Lamperouge. After C.C. aided Marianne and Marianne's husband Charles zi Britannia achieve their goals, C.C. was named head of the Geass Order, a secret organization that studies and produces Geass users. However, she left the order upon news of Marianne's death, and let V.V. take over. Years later she is captured by a Britannian envoy in Japan, which takes an interest in her immortality and intends to bring her to the Imperial city of Pendragon in North America.

Code Geass: Lelouch of the Rebellion[edit]

A fan exhibiting C.C.'s original costume, a bondage suit from the research facility she had been kept in.

Early in the series, Osaka is bombed and a "top-security asset of the Britannian government," or C.C., is stolen by terrorists hiding in the Shinjuku Ghetto. As a result, the Viceroy orders Shinjuku wiped out, and during the violence, C.C. and Lelouch encounter one-another. At their meeting, C.C. gives Lelouch the power of Geass, and he attempts to help her escape the soldiers.[25] Since she is shot in the incident and appears dead, he leaves her body behind.[26]

In episode five, she unexpectedly appears again in Lelouch's home. Lelouch encounters her casually folding origami with his sister Nunnally.[27] Afterwards she keeps an eye on Lelouch's missions as his rebel alter-ego Zero, even wearing his clothes and impersonating him when a situation becomes life-threatening.[28] She then joins his military mech organization the Black Knights, where she is seen as one of Zero's close advisors. Her unofficial position leads to some friction with other members.[29]

When the Black Knights gain possession of the Knightmare Frame Gawain, she becomes its pilot while Lelouch operates the weapons.[30] In the season finale, she uses the Gawain to battle Jeremiah Gottwald's Siegfried, to allow Lelouch to save his sister. After kissing Lelouch, she drags herself and the enemy to the ocean floor.[31]

Code Geass: Lelouch of the Rebellion R2[edit]

C.C. is in charge of the Black Knights at the start of the second season, where she and the others plan an operation to free Lelouch's memories from the Emperor of Britannia. After he is rescued, she again becomes his advisor.[32] After the location of the Geass Directorate is located, Lelouch orders C.C. to attack the facility, and she reluctantly kills her former colleagues at the Geass Order.[33]

After Lelouch and C.C. enter the mystical Sword of Akasha spirit realm, she reveals to him that her greatest wish is to die by giving up her Geass. Since Lelouch is not ready to accept it, she intends to offer it to his father, the Emperor Charles. Lelouch attempts to stop her and save her, and in doing so, her memories of everything past the day she acquired her Geass are lost, reverting her to a frightened slave girl. Believing himself to be responsible, Lelouch confines C.C. to his quarters and attempts to make her comfortable.[34] Later the spirit of Lelouche's mother, Marianne, possesses a body and locates C.C. to restore her memories. The two then leave for Kamine Island to re-enter the Sword of Akasha, rescuing main character Suzaku Kururugi along the way.[35] They enter the Sword of Akasha, where C.C.'s presence allows the Emperor to begin the Ragnarök Connection and merge everyone into the collective unconscious. When Lelouch kills Charles and Marianne before the connection can be completed, C.C. is spared because she had turned against their plan. A month later, she helps Lelouche seize the throne as the new Emperor of Britannia.[36]

Near the end of the series, C.C. and Lelouch bond and comfort one another, before being interrupted when Lelouch is attacked by his former Black Knights allies.[37] C.C. intervenes in her Lancelot so he can escape, and battles her former Black Knight co-pilot Kallen Stadtfeld. C.C. ejects to safety when she is easily defeated.[38] Later, as Lelouch plans to execute the captured Black Knights, C.C. prays for Lelouch in a church during his planned assassination. During the epilogue, C.C. is seen traveling the countryside in the back of a cart. She reminisces about how Lelouch proved the Geass does not bring loneliness, and expresses her feelings for him.[39]

Other film and television[edit]

In a special 2012 OVA parody episode Nunnally in Wonderland, based on the Alice in Wonderland story, C.C. appears in the role as a Cheshire Cat.[40] In the 2012 to 2016 Code Geass: Akito the Exiled spinoff of the television series, C.C. again appears. In March 2017, the media wrote that Kate Higgins would be reprising her role as the voice of C.C. in the dub of Code Geass: Akito the Exiled, to be released by Sunrise on June 27, 2017.[41]

Manga and graphic novels[edit]

In the 2006-2010 Code Geass manga, C.C. appears in the plot a number of times.[42] In the manga spin-off series Nightmare of Nunnally in 2007[43] and 2008,[44] C.C. assists Lelouch and Nunnally Lamperouge in a political maneuver. This spin-off series sees the reveal that C.C. was known as the "Witch of Britannia" and was the rival and foe of Joan of Arc, known as the "Witch of Orleans", during the Hundred Years' War.[45][46] In Chapter 13, it is revealed that in this timeline, C.C. was the killer of former Japanese Prime Minister Genbu Kururugi, not Suzaku Kururugi.[47]

In the graphic novel Code Geass: Suzaku of the Counterattack released in 2009 with a different plot, C.C.'s role is nearly identical to that of the anime.[48] C.C. appears again in the 2011 graphic novel Code Geass: Renya of Darkness. She interacts with the protagonist Renya, a young ninja training in Edo Japan. She offers Renya a contract so he can use the Geass to protect his friends.[49]

Video games[edit]

In Code Geass: Lost Colors, a video game for the PlayStation 2 and PlayStation Portable released in 2008, C.C. periodically interacts with the main character Rai. C.C. eats pizza in Rai's room, and later offers for Rai to join the Black Knights, with player response leading to different outcomes.[50]

C.C. appears in the 2010 video game Another Century's Episode: R[51] in her Knightmare Frame, Akatsuki Command Model C.C. Custom.[52]

C.C. and the rest of the Code Geass R1 cast will make their debut to the Super Robot Wars franchise in Super Robot Wars Z 2 Hakai-Hen, using their R1 Knightmares.

Critical reception[edit]

After she placed in third as the most popular female character in Animage magazine's 29th Anime Grand Prix, she won first place the following two years, in 2007 and 2008 (see list of Anime Grand Prix winners).

References[edit]

  1. ^ Shida, Hidekuni (January 2007). "Code Geass". Newtype USA. 6 (1). pp. 56–59. ISSN 1541-4817. 
  2. ^ "Code Geass to Premiere Series Finale in July Events". Anime News Network. May 10, 2007. Retrieved August 5, 2016. 
  3. ^ "Code Geass: Akito the Exiled's 3rd Episode Previewed in Video". Anime News Network. December 19, 2014. Retrieved August 5, 2016. 
  4. ^ Funimation Unveils Dub Cast For Code Geass: Akito the Exiled’s Returning Roles, Anime Herald, March 24, 2017, Mike Ferreira
  5. ^ ”The C’s World.” Episode 15 of Season 2 of Code Geass: Lelouch of the Rebellion R2 (July 20, 2008)
  6. ^ ”Zero.” Episode 25 of ‘’Code Geass: Lelouch of the Rebellion’’ Season 1 (October 26, 2008)
  7. ^ "The Day a New Demon Was Born". Code Geass. Episode 1. October 6, 2006
  8. ^ "The Girl in the Straitjacket." Audio Drama 13. June 27th, 2007
  9. ^ ”Battle at Kyushu.” Episode 20 of ‘’Code Geass: Lelouch of the Rebellion’’ Season 1 (September 14, 2008)
  10. ^ ”Zero.” Episode 25 of ‘’Code Geass: Lelouch of the Rebellion’’ Season 1 (October 26, 2008)
  11. ^ "CLAMP in Context: A Critical Study of the Manga and Anime" by Dani Cavallaro
  12. ^ ”The C’s World.” Episode 15 of Season 2 of Code Geass: Lelouch of the Rebellion R2 (July 20, 2008)
  13. ^ ”Zero.” Episode 25 of ‘’Code Geass: Lelouch of the Rebellion’’ Season 1 (October 26, 2008)
  14. ^ "The Day a New Demon Was Born". Code Geass. Episode 1. Season 1 October 6, 2006
  15. ^ Code Geass: "Island of the Gods" Review at IGN (September 8, 2008)
  16. ^ "Island of the Gods" Episode 19 of Code Geass (March 2, 2007)
  17. ^ "At Least with Sorrow" Episode 23 of Code Geass (March 30, 2007)
  18. ^ Examining the Multisemiotic Representation of Heroes/Villains in Code Geass, Chapter 4, Language Arts in Asia 2: English and Chinese through Literature, Drama and Popular Culture" (June 19, 2014) - Cambridge Scholars Publishing (ed. Christina DeCoursey)
  19. ^ "The Day a Demon Awakens." Episode 1 of Season 2 of ‘’Code Geass: Lelouch of the Rebellion R2’’ (November 2, 2008)
  20. ^ "The School Festival Declaration" Episode 21 of Code Geass: Lelouch of the Rebellion Season 1 (March 16, 2007)
  21. ^ "Knights of the Round" Episode 5 of Season 2 of Code Geass: Lelouch of the Rebellion R2 (May 4, 2008)
  22. ^ ”The C’s World.” Episode 15 of Season 2 of Code Geass: Lelouch of the Rebellion R2 (July 20, 2008)
  23. ^ ”Zero.” Episode 25 of ‘’Code Geass: Lelouch of the Rebellion’’ Season 1 (October 26, 2008)
  24. ^ Code Geass TV series' fifth DVD - special features
  25. ^ Examining the Multisemiotic Representation of Heroes/Villains in Code Geass, Chapter 4, Language Arts in Asia 2: English and Chinese through Literature, Drama and Popular Culture" (June 19, 2014) - Cambridge Scholars Publishing (ed. Christina DeCoursey)
  26. ^ "The Day a New Demon Was Born". Code Geass. Episode 1. Season 1 October 6, 2006
  27. ^ "The Princess and the Witch". Code Geass. Episode 5. November 3, 2006
  28. ^ ”Attack Cornelia.” Episode 7 of Code Geass: Lelouch of the Rebellion Season 1 (November 17, 2006)
  29. ^ ”I Order you, Suzaku Kururugi.” Episode 18 of Code Geass: Lelouch of the Rebellion Season 1 (February 22, 2007)
  30. ^ ”Battle at Kyushu.” Episode 20 of Code Geass: Lelouch of the Rebellion Season 1 (September 14, 2008)
  31. ^ ”Zero.” Episode 25 of Code Geass: Lelouch of the Rebellion Season 1 (October 26, 2008)
  32. ^ "The Day a Demon Awakens." Episode 1 of Season 2 of ‘’Code Geass: Lelouch of the Rebellion R2’’ (November 2, 2008)
  33. ^ ”Geass Hunt.” Episode 14 of Season 2 of Code Geass: Lelouch of the Rebellion R2 (July 13, 2008)
  34. ^ ”The C’s World.” Episode 15 of Season 2 of Code Geass: Lelouch of the Rebellion R2 (July 20, 2008)
  35. ^ "Emperor Dismissed" Episode 20 of Season 2 of Code Geass. August 24, 2008
  36. ^ "The Ragnarok Connection" Episode 22 of Season 2 of Code Geass. (August 31, 2008)
  37. ^ "Schneizel's Guise" Episode 23 of Season 2 of Code Geass. (September 14, 2008)
  38. ^ "The Grip of Damocles" Episode 24 of Season 2 of Code Geass. (September 21, 2008 )
  39. ^ "Re'" Episode 25 of Season 2 Code Geass. September 28, 2008
  40. ^ Code Geass: Nunnally in Wonderland, official OVA released in 2012.
  41. ^ Good News Anime on the new casting, March 23, 2017
  42. ^ Code Geass, chapter 2, ISBN 978-4-04-854230-2, September 26, 2008
  43. ^ コードギアス ナイトメア・オブ・ナナリー (1) (in Japanese). Kadokawa Shoten. Retrieved March 23, 2011. 
  44. ^ コードギアス ナイトメア・オブ・ナナリー (5) (in Japanese). Kadokawa Shoten. Retrieved March 23, 2011. 
  45. ^ Nightmare of Nunnally, chapter 11, pp 16-17
  46. ^ Nightmare of Nunnally, chapter 15, pp 16-22
  47. ^ Nightmare of Nunnally, chapter 13
  48. ^ "Code Geass Manga Volume 1: Suzaku Of The Counterattack". Amazon.com. ISBN 1594099774. Retrieved March 23, 2011. 
  49. ^ "Code Geass Shikkoku no Renya Vol. 1" (in Japanese). Amazon.com. ISBN 4047156078. Retrieved March 30, 2011. 
  50. ^ Code Geass: Lost Colors video gameplay
  51. ^ "人気ロボットアクションゲームが堂々復活!!『Another Century's Episode:R(アナザーセンチュリーズエピソード アール)』". April 8, 2010. Retrieved February 28, 2016. 
  52. ^ Another Century's Episode: R - gameplay